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The Overworked Mental Health Professional Have you ever heard of the terms “burnout,”  “compassion fatigue,” or “secondary traumatic stress?” If not, you’ll soon find out what these terms mean in this article. Each week we discuss issues specific to parents, families, caregivers, and individuals who are living with or helping someone with a mental health...
Virtual reality technology produces real behavior insights about crowd movements The cognitive scientists in the Virtual Environment Navigation lab at Brown University are not only advancing a frontier of behavioral research but also of technology. Led by Professor William Warren, the group developed a wireless virtual reality system to study a phenomenon that scientists don’t yet understand: how pedestrians interact with each other and how [...]The post Virtual reality technology produces real behavior insights about crowd movements appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents of newborns pay a high price for their interrupted sleep The familiar cry in the night, followed by a blind shuffle to the crib, a feeding, a diaper change, and a final retreat back into oblivion — every hour on the hour. Such is the sleep pattern of most new parents, who report feeling more exhausted in the morning than when they went to bed [...]The post Parents of newborns pay a high price for their interrupted sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Same genes drive math and reading ability Around half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, say scientists from UCL, the University of Oxford and King’s College London who led a study into the genetic basis of cognitive traits. While mathematics and reading ability are known to run in families, [...]The post Same genes drive math and reading ability appeared first on PsyPost.
Huntington’s disease protein helps wire the young brain The protein that is mutated in Huntington’s disease is critical for wiring the brain in early life, according to a new Duke University study. Huntington’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes a wide variety of symptoms, such as uncontrolled movements, inability to focus or remember, depression and aggression. By the time these symptoms [...]The post Huntington’s disease protein helps wire the young brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Huntington's disease protein helps wire young brain A surprising new role for the Huntington's disease protein has been uncovered: it helps wire connections in early brain development. Understanding more about how the protein works may help inform treatment for early stages of the disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes a wide variety of symptoms, such as uncontrolled movements, inability to focus or remember, depression and aggression.
Returning to Work after Addiction Treatment Every year, thousands of white-collar professionals enter treatment for addiction to alcohol and drugs. In treatment they are taught new skills for living productive and fulfilled lives without mind-altering substances. After completing a 30- to 90-day inpatient program, possibly with some additional time in a less restrictive sober living community,...
New research finds working memory is the key to early academic achievement Working memory in children is linked strongly to reading and academic achievement, a new study from the University of Luxembourg and partner Universities from Brazil* has shown. Moreover, this finding holds true regardless of socio-economic status. This suggests that children with learning difficulties might benefit from teaching methods that prevent working memory overload. The study [...]The post New research finds working memory is the key to early academic achievement appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows link between inflammation in maternal blood and schizophrenia in offspring Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein—an established inflammatory biomarker—appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring, according to researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, and the New York State Psychiatric Institute. The study, “Elevated Maternal C-Reactive [...]The post Study shows link between inflammation in maternal blood and schizophrenia in offspring appeared first on PsyPost.
Harmful hookahs: Many young smokers aren’t aware of the danger Despite warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hookah smoking can be just as dangerous as cigarettes, many young adults believe that using the water pipes is not harmful to their health, according to a UCLA School of Nursing study. Researchers visited three Southern California hookah lounges and asked patrons between the [...]The post Harmful hookahs: Many young smokers aren’t aware of the danger appeared first on PsyPost.
Anxious I am feeling very anxious. It was hard to stop washing my hands after one go ’round. It felt so good I wanted to do it again and again and again. I can wash my hands 30 times in a row. But with each turn, my anxiety heightens because I...
Honest or Popular? Sometimes We Just Have To Choose I live somewhere between philanthropy (love of humans, especially myself) and philosophy (love of truth, wisdom and reality whether it makes me happy and popular or not). A lot of us live there.
Philanthrophy Vs. Philosophy When to be honest? When to be kind? Of course there are times when you can be both at once, but you can't always.
Meet the Cambodian man who treats land mine victims’ phantom pain with mirrors Phantom pain, experienced in missing limbs, tortures amputees and puzzles scientists. Srinath Perur cycles round Cambodia with a man who treats it with mirrors. One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is [...]The post Meet the Cambodian man who treats land mine victims’ phantom pain with mirrors appeared first on PsyPost.
Meet the Cambodian man who treats land mine victim’s phantom pain with mirrors Phantom pain, experienced in missing limbs, tortures amputees and puzzles scientists. Srinath Perur cycles round Cambodia with a man who treats it with mirrors. One of the few Khmer words Stephen Sumner knows is chhue. It means ‘pain’, and it’s something Cambodian people know a lot about from their three-decade-long civil war. Stephen, 53, is [...]The post Meet the Cambodian man who treats land mine victim’s phantom pain with mirrors appeared first on PsyPost.
Explaining arachnophobia: Why are we afraid of spiders? By Chris Buddle, McGill University I have personal interest in arachnophobia – the fear of spiders – because I am a spider expert, but also because my daughter has it. She is not alone. According to the American Psychiatric Association, phobias affect more than one in ten people in the US, and of those individuals, [...]The post Explaining arachnophobia: Why are we afraid of spiders? appeared first on PsyPost.
To understand the brain you need electronic engineers too By Mark McDonnell, University of South Australia Electronic engineers are emerging as important contributors to understanding of the workings of the human brain. There is a rapidly growing intersection between electronic engineering and neuroscience. As a relatively new angle of attack, this kind of research could lead to breakthroughs in medical treatments of brain disorders [...]The post To understand the brain you need electronic engineers too appeared first on PsyPost.
weCloud: Thoughts on Leaf Blowers vs. Brooms How are leaf blowers and brooms like the choice you have in handling messes in your relationship? Here's a humorous take on the important difference between actually cleaning up a mess and blowing dirt all around. Working out the metaphor in your life is up to you.
Brains, genes and chemical imbalances – how explanations of mental illness affect stigma By Nick Haslam, University of Melbourne Depression, schizophrenia and other psychiatric conditions are increasingly linked to abnormalities in the brain and in our genes. Many professionals believe these developments hold the key to better treatments and their enthusiasm has spread. The public now endorses biogenetic (biological and genetic) explanations for mental health problems much more [...]The post Brains, genes and chemical imbalances – how explanations of mental illness affect stigma appeared first on PsyPost.
Getting Advice: Does it Hurt or Help? Has anyone ever said to you, “You shouldn’t feel that way,” “You are so insecure,” or “Your problem is that you don’t like yourself”? Many people hear this “advice” from spouses, family, friends, and coworkers. The problem is that these advisers don’t tell you what specifically to do about your...