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When Fear Makes People Fierce When feeling insecure, very few of us merely quake. We’re much more likely to act mean, nasty, defensive, tough, icy, domineering, biting, vicious--anything to defend against access to our fearful hearts. Fear makes us reach for armaments and armor.
5 Signs You’re Being Manipulated “Manipulative” is a dirty label assigned to clients. I’ve heard it from bosses and colleagues, read it on charts. However it’s also a very real thing many of us have experienced in our workplaces, classrooms, friendships and dating lives. And since it can be a difficult to recognize this red...
The One Second Self-Esteem Boost (try it) The reputation you have with yourself – your self-esteem – is the single most important factor for a fulfilling life. Nathaniel Branden Self-esteem pioneer Nathaniel Branden puts it all in context, doesn’t he? Your self-assessment is the determining factor in your success. You set yourself up for success or failure....
Do You Have a Challenging Toddler? 8 Simple, Proven Ah, toddler-hood: the years when a child’s mind is growing faster than their speech, where they have big feelings but little control. Parenting a toddler is challenging to say the least. My daughter is seven now, but I clearly remember those days of leaving the grocery cart full and walking...
ADHD: Tips to help kids with ADHD improve focus The upcoming school year is getting closer and closer. All kids who are headed back to school will have to manage some level of transition. For basically all kids, this requires them to become more focused, more disciplined, and more organized. Kids with ADHD may have an even more difficult...
When People Don’t Understand Your Mental Health Condition You have just been diagnosed with a mental health condition such as depression, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, addiction, OCD, or some other mental health disorder. You go see a counselor to get help. Eventually your relatives and closest friends find out your condition. The problem is that some of them...
Fear of losing money, not spending habits, affects investor risk tolerance: study As the U.S. economy slowly recovers, many investors remain wary about investing in the stock market. Investors’ “risk tolerance,” or their willingness to take risks, is an important factor for investors deciding whether, and how much, to invest in the stock market. Now, Michael Guillemette, an assistant professor of personal financial planning in the University [...]The post Fear of losing money, not spending habits, affects investor risk tolerance: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Brainwaves can predict TV audience reaction, study finds Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at The City College of New York, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong predictor. By analyzing the brainwaves of [...]The post Brainwaves can predict TV audience reaction, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Children with disabilities benefit from classroom inclusion he secret to boosting the language skills of preschoolers with disabilities may be to put them in classrooms with typically developing peers, a new study finds. Researchers found that the average language skills of a child’s classmates in the fall significantly predicted the child’s language skills in the spring – especially for children with disabilities. [...]The post Children with disabilities benefit from classroom inclusion appeared first on PsyPost.
Racial makeup of private prisons shows systemic disparities, new study finds A disproportionate number of Hispanics are housed in private prisons across the United States, a pattern that could leave such prisons vulnerable to legal challenges, new research from Oregon State University shows. The percentage of adult Hispanic inmates in private prisons was two points higher than those in public facilities, while the percentage of white [...]The post Racial makeup of private prisons shows systemic disparities, new study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Acute psychological stress promotes skin healing in mice Brief, acute psychological stress promoted healing in mouse models of three different types of skin irritations, in a study led by UC San Francisco researchers. The scientists found that healing was brought about by the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids – steroid hormones – produced by the adrenal glands in response to stress. “Under chronic stress, [...]The post Acute psychological stress promotes skin healing in mice appeared first on PsyPost.
Study highlights pervasive problem of sleep deprivation in astronauts Astronauts suffer considerable sleep deficiency in the weeks leading up to and during spaceflight, according to the most extensive study of sleep during spaceflight ever conducted, published in The Lancet Neurology journal. Fatigue and sleep deficiency are common complaints among astronauts, but this is the most comprehensive study to include both objective evaluation of sleep (via an [...]The post Study highlights pervasive problem of sleep deprivation in astronauts appeared first on PsyPost.
Water-polluting anxiety drug reduces fish mortality A drug that is commonly used to treat anxiety in humans and which regularly finds its way into surface waters through wastewater effluence has been shown to reduce mortality rates in fish. The results, which have been published today, 8 August, in IOP Publishing’s journal Environmental Research Letters, may have significant implications for existing standard ecotoxicological [...]The post Water-polluting anxiety drug reduces fish mortality appeared first on PsyPost.
Those Absolutely Essential Truths I Can’t Remember My dog fell ill, and I forgot every healthy lesson life has taught me. Ralphy, an eleven pound mass of gray white fur and–I believe–the most affectionate companion in the world, has been one of my most supportive friends for seven years. Saturday morning, after seeming tremulous and weak the night before, he showed no...
In Chinese: Crisis Does NOT Mean Danger and Opportunity JFK was wrong. On pinyin.info, a website about the Chinese language, Victor H. Mair, a professor of Chinese Language and Literature at the University of Pennsylvania, firmly corrects an American linguistic blunder that interprets the word “crisis” in Chinese as meaning both “danger” and “opportunity.” “The explication of the Chinese word for crisis as made […]
Shell shock treatments reveal the conflict in psychiatry’s heart By James Bradley, University of Melbourne One of the most iconic images of the first world war, the outbreak of which is being commemorated all over the world, is the deserter – heartlessly tried for cowardice, blindfolded and bound to a post, facing the firing squad. In all, 306 soldiers from British and Imperial forces [...]The post Shell shock treatments reveal the conflict in psychiatry’s heart appeared first on PsyPost.
The Cultural Curse of Knowledge and Movie Spoilers I've always demanded spoilers for what I watch, but I understand that most people like to go into films unspoiled. It's odd then, that the curse of knowledge makes spoilers for the most important films of our time unavoidable....
Self-Scapes of Fear                 How do you see yourself and your world?  The way you view both affects the way you live your life.  You may be quite secure about who you are and your safety in the world. Or not.  Let’s call the basic way...
4 Questions to Ask Yourself to Make Good Decisions We make countless minute and monumental decisions on a daily basis. What time will I wake up? What will I eat for breakfast? What tasks will I tackle at work? Should I say yes or no to this commitment? Do I want the promotion? Do I want this person for...
6 Rules for a Happy Life and Healthier Environment These six rules for personal happiness may also help save our environment. Pursuing true happiness not only benefits you but also the environment, according to research presented at the American Psychological Association's 122nd Annual Convention. Dr. Miriam Tatzel reviews decades of psychological research, arguing that the fundamentals of a happy life are also good for the environment... Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:How The Right Type of Materialism Can Make You Happy How Aging Changes What Makes You Happy Happy Habits: How to Fix Bad Moods How To Be Happy: 6 Most Uplifting TED Talks 8 Psychological Keys to Spending Wisely