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Marijuana dependence alters the brain's response to drug paraphernalia New research demonstrates that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users. By letting users handle a marijuana pipe while in an fMRI, researchers found that areas of brain activation in the dependent users suggests a more emotional connection than in non-dependent users. Non-dependent users had greater activations in areas associated with memory and attention.
New knowledge about brain's effective bouncer Researchers are shedding new light on the brain's complicated barrier tissue. The blood-brain barrier is an effective barrier which protects the brain, but which at the same time makes it difficult to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's. In an in vitro blood-brain barrier, researchers can recreate the brain's transport processes for the benefit of the development of new pharmaceuticals for the brain.
9 Ways to Help a Friend or Family Member All of a sudden your best friend stops calling. She no longer wants to join you for yoga on Saturday mornings. The last time you saw her she looked fragile and sad, like someone else was living in her body. Her husband doesn’t know what to do so he solicits...
On The Road Of Life With ADHD I’ve noticed that a lot of ADHD references involve transit. Dr. Edward Hallowell often talks about us having Ferrari engines and bicycle brakes. I’ve talked about our thoughts being like the tracks in a rail yard where all the switches randomly shunt our focus around from one siding to another....
The power of making amends: How conciliatory gestures promote human forgiveness It’s well known that when a person takes steps to make amends for a wrongdoing, the victim is more inclined to forgive and forget. However, exactly why that happens is less obvious and poorly understood. In a recent study, scientists made substantial progress in explaining the psychological processes that make forgiveness happen. Their findings show [...]The post The power of making amends: How conciliatory gestures promote human forgiveness appeared first on PsyPost.
Leaving a Sex Addict: 5 Frequently Asked Questions Divorce is always a big adjustment and often carries with it a period of grief and other strong emotions. But breaking up with a sex addict brings its own strange set of challenges.  Here are some of the questions people in this situation have to deal with.     Will...
Small changes, and hopes, for preventing dementia Preventing dementia might be as simple as making everyday changes toward healthier lifestyles, behavior modification and stress reduction.
Is your Relationship Healthy? Are you in a healthy relationship? What does it mean to be in a healthy relationship? What about being in a violent relationship? What are the signs of an unhealthy relationship? Hopefully this post will help answer these questions and help to identify a healthy and unhealthy relationship. According to...
National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month Did you know that July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month? If not, you’re not alone. Sadly this month is often overlooked by the majority of Americans. It is a time when summer has bloomed, fireworks have entered the scene, and multiple summer parties and cook-outs are in full...
The Problem With Being Gifted Even the gifted need these three things to succeed.
Transplantation of new brain cells reverses memory loss in Alzheimer's disease model A new study has revealed a way to alleviate the learning and memory deficits caused by apoE4, the most important genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, improving cognition to normal levels in aged mice. The success of the treatment in older mice, which corresponded to late adulthood in humans, is particularly important, as this would be the age that would be targeted were this method ever to be used therapeutically in people.
Underlying cause of cerebral palsy could lie in family links; Relatives including first cousins could be at risk Babies born into families in which someone has cerebral palsy are at an increased risk of having the condition, suggests new research. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in children, affecting approximately two in 1,000 live births in the developed world (and many more elsewhere). It originates from damage to the 'immature' brain and several risk factors in pregnancy have been identified such as preterm delivery, abnormal growth, exposure to infection and lack of oxygen at birth.
New Study Suggests Audio Hypnosis Could Help With Deep A new study suggests that listening to audio hypnosis just before bed may help some people reach a state of deep sleep and remain there for a longer period of time. The research, published in the journal Sleep, is the first to observe the connection between hypnosis and sleep through...
Neurons, brain cancer cells require the same little-known protein for long-term survival Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have discovered that the protein PARC/CUL9 helps neurons and brain cancer cells override the biochemical mechanisms that lead to cell death in most other cells. In neurons, long-term survival allows for proper brain function as we age. In brain cancer cells, though, long-term survival contributes to tumor growth [...]The post Neurons, brain cancer cells require the same little-known protein for long-term survival appeared first on PsyPost.
4 Ways to Repurpose Existing Content for Blog Posts You already have content for hundreds of blog posts. You just don’t know it. Therapists who are new to blogging sometimes have a difficult time finding material to write about.  So where to begin?  Actually, it’s much easier than you might expect. An excellent strategy to finding material to write...
New hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease Judes Poirier, PhD, C.Q., from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montréal (Canada) and his team have discovered that a relatively frequent genetic variant actually conveys significant protection against the common form of Alzheimer’s disease and can delay the onset of the disease by as much as 4 years. This discovery opens [...]The post New hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Study reveals how gardens could help dementia care A new study has revealed that gardens in care homes could provide promising therapeutic benefits for patients suffering from dementia. The research is published in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association and by critically reviewing the findings from 17 different pieces of research, has found that outdoor spaces can offer environments that promote relaxation, encourage [...]The post Study reveals how gardens could help dementia care appeared first on PsyPost.
Defects in fatty acid transport proteins linked to schizophrenia and autism Using diverse methodologies, neuroscientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute report that defects in Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs) may help to explain the pathology in some cases of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. After identifying mutations in FABPs from patients, the group led by Senior Team Leader Takeo Yoshikawa determined that the genetic disruption [...]The post Defects in fatty acid transport proteins linked to schizophrenia and autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Taking B vitamins won’t prevent Alzheimer’s disease Taking B vitamins doesn’t slow mental decline as we age, nor is it likely to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, conclude Oxford University researchers who have assembled all the best clinical trial data involving 22,000 people to offer a final answer on this debate. High levels in the blood of a compound called homocysteine have been found [...]The post Taking B vitamins won’t prevent Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Hear Jane read: Researcher gives new meaning to semantics For years a key way of diagnosing dyslexia has been how well a person reads aloud. Similarly, the reading skills of adult readers also have been assessed by having them read words aloud. “The idea is that the more you read in English, the more you will encounter words that don’t follow standard rules of [...]The post Hear Jane read: Researcher gives new meaning to semantics appeared first on PsyPost.