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Target identified for rare inherited neurological disease in men Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified the mechanism by which a rare, inherited neurodegenerative disease causes often crippling muscle weakness in men, in addition to reduced fertility. The study, published August 10 in the journal Nature Neuroscience, shows that a gene mutation long recognized as a key to the development [...]The post Target identified for rare inherited neurological disease in men appeared first on PsyPost.
Robin Williams, Bipolar Sufferer, Dead at 63 Due to When a person chooses suicide, it’s hard to accept that choice. Comedian and award-winning actor Robin Williams apparently made that choice earlier this morning. Robin Williams has long been a sufferer of bipolar disorder, a mental illness where the person fluctuates between episodes of extreme energy, focus and productivity (mania)...
RIP Robin Williams   It is being reported by several reputable news sources that Robin Williams passed away this morning, at the age of 63, from an apparent suicide by asphyxiation. He was best known for films such as Good Will Hunting, Mrs. Doubtfire, Good Morning Vietnam, and TV’s incomparable Mork from Mork...
Thriving with Mental Illness: Q&A with Heather Foster “Thriving with Mental Illness” is a regular interview series featuring individuals who have a mental illness and are living well. Unfortunately, we don’t hear these stories nearly enough. We don’t hear nearly enough about people with mental illness who are living healthy, meaningful lives. And we don’t hear nearly enough...
Therapy and the Pdoc Today was a hard day. I had therapy and an appointment with my psychiatrist, both in the same office suite. When I arrived the tiny waiting room was packed with little ones to quite big ones. I waited a step away from the guy in front of me at the...
Is Facebook Really Turning Us into Narcissists? There is mounting evidence that narcissism is related to heavy Facebook use, and many in the popular media are quick to blame Facebook for increasing levels of narcissism. However new research suggests that Facebook use may be a consequence, and not a cause, of narcissism.
Biomarker could reveal why some develop post-traumatic stress disorder (ptsd) Blood expression levels of genes targeted by the stress hormones called glucocorticoids could be a physical measure, or biomarker, of risk for developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), researchers report. PTSD is triggered by a terrifying event, either witnessed or experienced. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event. Not everyone who experiences trauma develops PTSD, which is why the study aimed to identify biomarkers that could better measure each person's vulnerability to the disorder.
Blood cells are a new and unexpected source of neurons in crayfish Researchers have strived for years to determine how neurons are produced and integrated into the brain throughout adult life. In an intriguing twist, scientists reporting in the August 11 issue of the Cell Press journal Developmental Cell provide evidence that adult-born neurons are derived from a special type of circulating blood cell produced by the immune system. [...]The post Blood cells are a new and unexpected source of neurons in crayfish appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Dimmer switch’ drug idea could tackle schizophrenia without side effects Discovery of a new mechanism of drug action could lead to the next generation of drugs to treat schizophrenia. Affecting one per cent of the world’s population, schizophrenia is a major health condition. It affects a person’s ability to think, feel and act and is associated with distressing symptoms including hallucinations and delusions. New Monash [...]The post ‘Dimmer switch’ drug idea could tackle schizophrenia without side effects appeared first on PsyPost.
‘An exceptional feat’: Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months. As a first demonstration of its potential, researchers used the brain-like tissue to study chemical and electrical changes that occur immediately [...]The post ‘An exceptional feat’: Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue appeared first on PsyPost.
Celebrity promotion of charities ‘is largely ineffective,’ says research Celebrity promotion of charities is ineffective at raising awareness, but can make the stars more popular with the public, new research says. According to journal articles by three UK academics, “the ability of celebrity and advocacy to reach people is limited” and celebrities are “generally ineffective” at encouraging people to care about “distant suffering”. The [...]The post Celebrity promotion of charities ‘is largely ineffective,’ says research appeared first on PsyPost.
Giving extra testosterone to healthy men increases their brains’ response to threat Testosterone, a steroid hormone, is well known to contribute to aggressive behavior in males, but the neural circuits through which testosterone exerts these effects have not been clear. Prior studies found that the administration of a single dose of testosterone influenced brain circuit function. Surprisingly, however,these studies were conducted exclusively in women. Researchers, led by [...]The post Giving extra testosterone to healthy men increases their brains’ response to threat appeared first on PsyPost.
Clues emerge to genetic architecture of cognitive abilities in children How genes affect intelligence is complicated. Multiple genes, many yet unknown, are thought to interact among themselves and with environmental factors to influence the diverse abilities involved in intelligence. A large new genetic study in thousands of children and adolescents offers early glimpses of the overall patterns and connections among cognitive abilities such as language [...]The post Clues emerge to genetic architecture of cognitive abilities in children appeared first on PsyPost.
#111 Making Love Real Connection, the second  principle of our parenting plan, is at the heart of  See Saw Parenting. If we know we are committed, connection allows us to show that we are committed. Without it, the family unit becomes like an engine running without oil. When it is not present the best...
Normal cognition in patient without apolipoprotein E, risk factor for Alzheimer's A 40-year-old California man exhibits normal cognitive function although he has no apolipoprotein E, which is believed to be important for brain function but a mutation of which is also a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Researchers suggest this could mean that therapies to reduce apolipoprotein E in the central nervous system may one day help treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.
Groundbreaking approach to understanding social interaction Scientists have created the Human Dynamic Clamp to address the difficult problem of studying social interactions in the laboratory. Using state-of-the-art human-machine interface technology, the Human Dynamic Clamp works by having humans interact with a computational model that behaves very much like humans themselves. In simple experiments, the model – on receiving input from human movement – drives an image of a moving hand which is displayed on a video screen.
Can fiction stories make us more empathetic? Empathy is important for navigating complex social situations, and is considered a highly desirable trait. Raymond Mar, a psychologist at York University in Canada, discussed how exposure to narrative fiction may improve our ability to understand what other people are thinking or feeling in his session at the American Psychological Association’s 122nd Annual Convention. Exposure [...]The post Can fiction stories make us more empathetic? appeared first on PsyPost.
Mapping infant brain growth in first three months of life using MRI technology A new approach to measuring early brain development of infants has been developed by scientists, resulting in more accurate whole brain growth charts and providing the first estimates for growth trajectories of subcortical areas during the first three months after birth. For the first time, researchers used MRI of the newborn brain to calculate the volume of multiple brain regions and to map out regional growth trajectories during the infant's first 90 days of life.
Want to kill creativity of women in teams? Fire up the competition Recent research has suggested that women play better with others in small working groups, and that adding women to a group is a surefire way to boost team collaboration and creativity. But a new study from Washington University in St. Louis finds that this is only true when women work on teams that aren’t competing [...]The post Want to kill creativity of women in teams? Fire up the competition appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain training games won’t help children do better at school By Emma Blakey, University of Sheffield There has been a big increase recently in the number of computerised “brain training” programs marketed at young children. These programs make impressive claims – that they can help children learn better, that they improve children’s focus and memory, and that they can help children succeed in school. There’s [...]The post Brain training games won’t help children do better at school appeared first on PsyPost.