Article Description
Passengers who survived terrifying flight help psychologists uncover new clues about post-traumatic stress vulnerability An extraordinary opportunity to study memory and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a group of Air Transat passengers who experienced 30 minutes of unimaginable terror over the Atlantic Ocean in 2001 has resulted in the discovery of a potential risk factor that may help predict who is most vulnerable to PTSD.
3 Tips to Change Your Perspective on Nearly Everything Recently I took drastic measures to shift my perspective and conjure up some new ideas, and I can’t wait to tell you all about it! You see, I’ve been talking a lot lately with activist allies about climate change, or global warming, or climate chaos if you prefer. Like so...
The Daytime Benefits of Lucid Dreaming Study finds cognitive benefits for those who realise they are in a dream while dreaming. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Dreams: 10 Striking Insights From Psychological Science Later School Start Times Improve Sleep and Daytime Functioning in Adolescents The Upside of Anger: 6 Psychological Benefits of Getting Mad You Can Learn a New Language While You Sleep, Study Finds 8 Ironic Effects of Thought Suppression
Why You Might Not Want to Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain After I first read the popular New York Times article by Daniel J. Levitin, “Hit the Reset Button in Your Brain,” my reply to the person who tweeted it was, “I would do that more often if the process of booting back up didn't take so long.” Why do some people have more trouble starting back up after breaks than others?
Signs You May Be in a Codependent Relationship A codependent relationship is an unhealthy relationship. When someone is “being codependent,” they’re either excessively controlling or compliant in a relationship; don’t practice self-care or have much self-respect; and enable their partner to engage in self-destructive behavior, according to Chris Kingman, LCSW, a psychotherapist in the Flatiron District in New...
ADHD Eclectic (or How I Found The Perfect Summer Job) Last Friday I started a small temporary part time job. Helping set up for a local folk festival. The hours are long and the work is hard, but on the other hand, the pay is lousy. I get my admission covered to get into the festival for the whole weekend....
One death too many One of the first things I do in the morning is check the front pages of the daily papers and on the day following Robin Williams’ death, rarely have I been so disappointed in the British press. Over the years, we have gathered a lot of evidence from reliable studies that show that how suicide […]
Change: Learning How To Roll With Your Own Resistance Change. It’s a simple word but it can mean so many things to the person experiencing the change. I’ve had many changes in my personal life, changes that were both good and bad. Some change is on time and other changes come at the wrong time. Still, other changes are...
Where's my car? Key brain region in contextual memories studied by researchers A previously understudied part of the brain, the retrosplenial cortex, is essential for forming the basis for contextual memories, which help you to recall events ranging from global disasters to where you parked your car. Although it is known that a specific network of brain regions is important for contextual memory, it has remained unknown how different parts of the network contribute to this process, until now.
The evolution of PMS: It may exist to break up infertile relationships A brave scientist has sought to answer a question that has baffled for centuries: why do women get premenstrual syndrome (PMS)? Professor of Molecular Evolution, Michael Gillings, believes that in our evolutionary past there was a hidden selective advantage to PMS, because it increased the chance that infertile pair bonds would dissolve, thus improving the [...]
Anxiety and amen: Prayer doesn’t ease symptoms of anxiety-related disorders for everyone Whether the problem is health, enemies, poverty or difficulty with aging, “Take your burden to the Lord and leave it there,” suggested the late gospel musician Charles A. Tindley. But when it comes to easing symptoms of anxiety-related disorders, prayer doesn’t have the same effect for everybody, according to Baylor University research. What seemed to [...]
Contagious yawns show social ties in humans and bonobos By Penny Orbell, The Conversation Most of us have experienced the overwhelming urge to yawn in response to another person yawning – but we’re not the only species to do this. Research published in PeerJ today shows bonobos – our closest evolutionary cousins – also experience “yawn contagion”, and, as in humans, the effect is influenced by the [...]
Don’t make assumptions about comedy and depression after the death of Robin Williams By Peter Kinderman, University of Liverpool News of Robin Williams’s suicide will have taken many of us by surprise. We always feel a mix of emotions when we hear someone famous, successful, creative and much loved has been suffering unbearable distress. But the fact remains that most of us are not equipped to see the [...]
Idleness and Being Creative – Part 2 Continued from Part 1 Lawton Ursery, quoted earlier, writes in his Forbes magazine article Your Brain Unplugged: Proof That Spacing Out Makes You More Effective: “We’re taught that taking on more is better—it makes us more valuable. The reality is that doing too many things makes us less...
Is Your Quest For Safety Putting You In Danger? In love relationships as in military strategy and politics, our intuition that "one can't be too cautious" can be very dangerous. Caution should be exercised cautiously. Strive to be as wary as necessary but not warier.
Close to Tragic: Unconsidered Personality Echoes of the mantra “every person is unique” are heard everywhere from rock and roll to kids’ cartoons. But how much do we actually take this anthem into consideration in our everyday relations and particularly in the world of gifted education? And well, what may be at stake if we don’t?
Robin Williams’ Depression and Suicide Robin Williams killed himself yesterday. I tried to kill myself August 8th of 2005 so I know perhaps a little bit about how he felt. My best friend Santiago killed himself in November 2005 so I also know what it feels like for those who are left behind to sort...
The Comedic Mask of Depression   The tragic death of mega-watt celebrity Robin Williams has sent shock waves around the world. Suddenly, a bright spotlight is being shown on the topic of depression, revealing a truer, perhaps more disturbing reality of an insidious mental health problem that is not often discussed and widely misunderstood. As...
How Robin Williams is like Elaina J (trigger warning) I’ve had a rough time with the passing of Robin Williams. He is one of my comedic heroes – right up there with Steve Martin and Martin Short and Lucille Ball. Classically funny. Funny on camera in a series. Funny in an interview. Always funny. I grew up with Robin...
Love is Patient, Love is Kind, Love is…a Burden? As individuals, we long for it. As human beings, we crave it and in fact we cannot live without it for long. As a culture, we obsess on it. Love. We have a communal dialogue about it incessantly, through books, movies and talk shows. We reduce ourselves to voyeurs and...