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Can running help autistic children? Evidence shows that running helps people with autism improve their emotional and physical health.
When Words Fail in Therapy If you think of art, music, movement and playing as methods of communicating and you want to see more of that in your therapy, see if you can get your therapist to work with you. If you’re assigned homework in CBT, see if there is a way you can do...
Chinese researchers describe impaired self-face recognition in those with major depressive disorder Neuropsychological impairment has long been established as a fundamental characteristic of depression, but a specific pattern of impairment that is widely recognized has not been summarized. Professor Jia Hongxiao and his group from the Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, explore major depressive disorder (MDD) from the perspective of neuropsychology. They found that the self-serving [...]The post Chinese researchers describe impaired self-face recognition in those with major depressive disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Worm study provides hope for deadly disease of the brain An untreatable and deadly neurodegenerative disease has been modelled and treated in worms by University of Liverpool researchers, suggesting a cure could be found for humans. The scientists studied adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) which usually strikes around 1 in 100,000 people in Europe and North America in their 30s and results in death by [...]The post Worm study provides hope for deadly disease of the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Seeing the glass as half full: Taking a new look at cognition and aging From a cognitive perspective, aging is typically associated with decline. As we age, it may get harder to remember names and dates, and it may take us longer to come up with the right answer to a question. But the news isn’t all bad when it comes to cognitive aging, according to a set of [...]The post Seeing the glass as half full: Taking a new look at cognition and aging appeared first on PsyPost.
Poor sleep quality linked to lower physical activity in people with PTSD A new study shows that worse sleep quality predicts lower physical activity in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Results show that PTSD was independently associated with worse sleep quality at baseline, and participants with current PTSD at baseline had lower physical activity one year later. Further analysis found that sleep quality completely mediated the [...]The post Poor sleep quality linked to lower physical activity in people with PTSD appeared first on PsyPost.
Does practice really make perfect? Does practice really make perfect? It’s an age-old question, and a new study from Rice University, Princeton University and Michigan State University finds that while practice won’t make you perfect, it will usually make you better at what you’re practicing. “This question is the subject of a long-running debate in psychology,” said Fred Oswald, professor [...]The post Does practice really make perfect? appeared first on PsyPost.
Oregon study details brain pathways linking visual function, running A new study by researchers at the University of Oregon published today in the journal Neuron describes a brainstem circuit in mice that may help explain how active movement impacts the way the brain processes sensory information. “Previous studies have examined changes in the visual cortex of mice during running. What was unknown was how do running [...]The post Oregon study details brain pathways linking visual function, running appeared first on PsyPost.
People in leadership positions may sacrifice privacy for security People with higher job status may be more willing to compromise privacy for security reasons and also be more determined to carry out those decisions, according to researchers. This preoccupation with security may shape policy and decision-making in areas ranging from terrorism to investing, and perhaps cloud other options, said Jens Grossklags, assistant professor of [...]The post People in leadership positions may sacrifice privacy for security appeared first on PsyPost.
What do Google searches tell us about our climate change fears? Republicans search the Net for information about the weather, climate change and global warming during extremely hot or cold spells. Democrats google these terms when they experience changes in the average temperatures. These are some of the surprising findings from a study by Corey Lang of the University of Rhode Island in the US, published [...]The post What do Google searches tell us about our climate change fears? appeared first on PsyPost.
Drug’s effect on Alzheimer’s may depend on severity of disease A cancer drug that has shown promise against Alzheimer’s disease in mice and has begun early clinical trials has yielded perplexing results in a novel mouse model of AD that mimics the genetics and pathology of the human disease more closely than any other animal model. The drug, bexarotene, was found to reduce levels of the [...]The post Drug’s effect on Alzheimer’s may depend on severity of disease appeared first on PsyPost.
The Many Faces of Being Borderline   Misreading neutral facial expressions as hostile is reported to be what distinguishes BPD from other mental illness disorders according to this article from US News Health Rolling the eyes, the extended blink, the nose wrinkle, the eyebrow rise, the lip twitch; all these can be erroneously interpreted as provocative,...
A Very Public Suicide and Those of Us Left Behind I saw the news Monday morning that there was a jumper on the Williamsburg Bridge. In a city of eight million people it’s not uncommon news. The report said: black male in his early 30s, no name, a note was found in his briefcase. They emphasized how he had snarled...
Better things I wrote another blog post yesterday afternoon to post today but it suddenly feels too naked. So, instead, I will write something new. I am not happy today. This day is not unlike any other. I got up. I took care of the dogs. I got ready. But today I went...
Persistent symptoms following concussion may be posttraumatic stress disorder The long-lasting symptoms that many patients contend with following mild traumatic brain injury, also known as concussion, may be posttraumatic disorder and not postconcussion syndrome. Concussion accounts for more than 90 percent of all TBIs, although little is known about prognosis for the injury.
Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study. Compared to people with no brain injury, those with injuries had brain damage in brain white matter consisting of disruption to nerve axons, those parts of nerve cells that make up white matter and that allow brain cells to transmit messages to each other, a study shows.
Using Mindfulness to Tolerate a Terrible Breakup Alisa Valdes launches her new borderline recovery blog with a post about how she is working hard with Dialectical Behavioral Therapy to get through the unspeakable pain of being dumped by her fiance, in hopes of avoiding her usual self-destructive patterns.
SNL’s Brooks Whelan: Talk It Out Television’s Saturday Night Live is comedy’s premier prestigious launching pad into stratospheric show business success. The legendary list of movie superstars the show has produced is too luminously long to list here. To be included in SNL’s clever cast is to have your comedic resume branded with the gold standard,...
Humans beat computers at ‘sensing numbers’ without counting – for now By Sylvia Tippmann, The Conversation When faced with choosing the shortest queue at a supermarket, what do you do? Nobody starts counting – what our brain does is “number sensing”. The ability to gauge numbers occurs without knowing how to count has been linked to mathematical skill, and it varies largely between people. Researchers have [...]The post Humans beat computers at ‘sensing numbers’ without counting – for now appeared first on PsyPost.
Body doubles and alien replicants: Capgras delusions explained By Ricky van der Zwan In the film Invasion of the Body Snatchers aliens invade earth by replicating individuals. While the idea that we could be duped by shape-shifting aliens is a great idea for a film, the story echoes a bizarre appeal playing out around Senate elections in the United States. Senate candidate Timothy [...]The post Body doubles and alien replicants: Capgras delusions explained appeared first on PsyPost.