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Some Things We Might Learn from Robin Williams’ Death “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” – Plato As shock waves resulting from Robin Williams’ suicide begin to settle, we might reflect upon what we might learn from this tragic event. Viktor Frankl, a concentration camp survivor and author of the classic book, Man’s Search...
Brain imaging shows brain differences in risk-taking teens Brain differences associated with risk-taking teens have been investigated by researchers who found that connections between certain brain regions are amplified in teens more prone to risk. "Our brains have an emotional-regulation network that exists to govern emotions and influence decision-making," explained the study's lead author. "Antisocial or risk-seeking behavior may be associated with an imbalance in this network."
Revealed: The Type of Music That Makes You Feel Most Powerful If you want to get pumped up before a big event, what type of music should you choose? Music has already been shown to have all kinds of effects on the mind, like making you happier, reducing pain and bringing people together. Now a new study finds that music of the right kind can transform the listener's sense of power.... Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Powerful People Feel Taller Than They Really Are Music and Memory: 5 Awesome New Psychology Studies Antidepressants: Higher Rates of Psychological Side-Effects Revealed by New Study Why Do We Enjoy Listening to Sad Music? How a Psychological Bias Makes Groups Feel Good About Themselves And Discredit Others
Robin Williams and Death: Dealing With the Physical and Robin Williams committed suicide earlier this week. Say that again, out loud. Robin Williams — one of the world’s funniest and, despite suffering from depression, seemingly happiest men on earth — committed suicide. Williams isn’t the first beloved celebrity to take his own life, but he is one so beloved...
Instant Self-Esteem Boosters Maybe you’ve been in a slump lately.  Maybe it’s situational (you lost your job, and the market’s brutal, or are having relationship issues.)  Maybe you’re chronically struggling with self-esteem.  Or maybe I just caught you on a bad day.  For anyone who’s feeling low, these boosters should help. 1)  Change...
The 3 Revolutions Rocking Our Social Worlds When I was growing up, there was a big telephone stuck to the kitchen wall. I used it occasionally, as did everyone else in the family, but mostly, our contacts with other people took place in person. When I had a question about something relevant to my schoolwork, I looked...
Push Me, Pull You, Which to Do? Last week’s cartoon is called: How You View Your Therapist Tells Her Everything  She Needs to Know About You .  All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2014,  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to get notified of...
It Seems Like Hyper Focus, I Swear It Does! I’m working on something. It’s a project. Well, actually, I’m hoping it’s a career. I’m hoping it’s my career. I’ve told you I write music. I’ve mentioned that I play a bit too, I’m sure, I’m not really well known for subtlety. And I’ve mentioned I’ve been published a couple...
Best of Our Blogs: August 15, 2014 “Depression is different for everyone, but for me it was like I wandered into a swamp and couldn’t remember how I got there, but more importantly I couldn’t remember why I wanted to get back out of it.” – Before Happiness author Shawn Achor, Super Soul Sunday It’s difficult to grieve over...
5 Truths About the Addict in Your Life Most families have been touched by addiction. Many have been forever altered by it. And though most people are affected by it, few understand it. This is because addiction is not a logical disease. The selfishness, the repeated mistakes despite devastating consequences – none of it makes sense, not even...
Personal Stories Week: Learning From Personal Experience It’s that time of year again when I collaborate with a group of readers, writers, parents, twitter followers, friends, and colleagues to discuss, during 1 entire week, their experiences with mental illness. Their experiences could be personal or professional and focus on challenges, miracles, systemic difficulties, financial strain, failures of the...
9 Ways to Find Happiness It may seem self-serving to some to study happiness in a world full of misery. However, research findings support the theory that being happy motivates people to constructive action in the world. So cultivating happiness and well-being influence your energy and enthusiasm. Happiness is not a static state or a...
Memories of errors foster faster learning Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.
Ecstasy makes others seem more trustworthy and increases generosity: study New research has found that people under the influence of the drug commonly referred to as ecstasy or molly — known scientifically as methylenedioxymethamphetamine — see others as more trustworthy and are more generous with their money. The pro-social feelings elicited by MDMA are well documented, but University College London researcher LH Stewart and his [...]The post Ecstasy makes others seem more trustworthy and increases generosity: study appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Spot Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is when a person is excessively preoccupied with power, vanity, prestige, and are unable to see the damage they may be causing themselves or others. People with NPD have an exaggerated feeling of self importance, sense of entitlement, and lack empathy.  Those who have NPD believe they...
5 Tips to Help Your Couple Relationship Not Only Survive but Learn to Thrive The top ten reasons couples decide to call it quits is the subject of a survey conducted by the law firm Slater and Gordon, and published in March 2014. A total of 1,000 divorcees were interviewed on questions pertaining to their reason/s for divorce and the process by which the decision to leave the marriage […]
Involuntary eye movement a foolproof indication for ADHD diagnosis Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed — and misdiagnosed — behavioral disorder in children in America, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unfortunately, there are currently no reliable physiological markers to diagnose ADHD. Doctors generally diagnose the disorder by recording a medical and social history of the patient [...]The post Involuntary eye movement a foolproof indication for ADHD diagnosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard “Now we may have a handle on how this tiny part of the brain exerts tremendous control over our thoughts and perceptions,” said Michael Halassa, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor at New York University’s Langone Medical Center and a lead investigator of the study. “These results may be a gateway into understanding the circuitry that underlies [...]The post Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard appeared first on PsyPost.
Gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked to multiple sclerosis A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. Investigators report that even minor reductions in conduction velocity may aggravate disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in mice bred for the MS-like condition experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). A strong tool for investigating the pathophysiology of a [...]The post Gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked to multiple sclerosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Reclassification of PTSD diagnosis potentially excludes soldiers diagnosed under previous criteria A new head-to-head comparison of screening questionnaires for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, shows a worrying discordance between the previous version of the PTSD definition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—fourth edition (DSM-IV) and DSM-5, released in 2013. The authors, led by Dr Charles Hoge of the Walter Reed [...]The post Reclassification of PTSD diagnosis potentially excludes soldiers diagnosed under previous criteria appeared first on PsyPost.