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9 Ways to Find Happiness It may seem self-serving to some to study happiness in a world full of misery. However, research findings support the theory that being happy motivates people to constructive action in the world. So cultivating happiness and well-being influence your energy and enthusiasm. Happiness is not a static state or a...
Memories of errors foster faster learning Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: They are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.
Ecstasy makes others seem more trustworthy and increases generosity: study New research has found that people under the influence of the drug commonly referred to as ecstasy or molly — known scientifically as methylenedioxymethamphetamine — see others as more trustworthy and are more generous with their money. The pro-social feelings elicited by MDMA are well documented, but University College London researcher LH Stewart and his [...]The post Ecstasy makes others seem more trustworthy and increases generosity: study appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Spot Narcissistic Personality Disorder Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) is when a person is excessively preoccupied with power, vanity, prestige, and are unable to see the damage they may be causing themselves or others. People with NPD have an exaggerated feeling of self importance, sense of entitlement, and lack empathy.  Those who have NPD believe they...
5 Tips to Help Your Couple Relationship Not Only Survive but Learn to Thrive The top ten reasons couples decide to call it quits is the subject of a survey conducted by the law firm Slater and Gordon, and published in March 2014. A total of 1,000 divorcees were interviewed on questions pertaining to their reason/s for divorce and the process by which the decision to leave the marriage […]
Involuntary eye movement a foolproof indication for ADHD diagnosis Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most commonly diagnosed — and misdiagnosed — behavioral disorder in children in America, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Unfortunately, there are currently no reliable physiological markers to diagnose ADHD. Doctors generally diagnose the disorder by recording a medical and social history of the patient [...]The post Involuntary eye movement a foolproof indication for ADHD diagnosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard “Now we may have a handle on how this tiny part of the brain exerts tremendous control over our thoughts and perceptions,” said Michael Halassa, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor at New York University’s Langone Medical Center and a lead investigator of the study. “These results may be a gateway into understanding the circuitry that underlies [...]The post Scientists use lasers to control mouse brain switchboard appeared first on PsyPost.
Gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked to multiple sclerosis A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. Investigators report that even minor reductions in conduction velocity may aggravate disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in mice bred for the MS-like condition experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). A strong tool for investigating the pathophysiology of a [...]The post Gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked to multiple sclerosis appeared first on PsyPost.
Reclassification of PTSD diagnosis potentially excludes soldiers diagnosed under previous criteria A new head-to-head comparison of screening questionnaires for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, shows a worrying discordance between the previous version of the PTSD definition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders—fourth edition (DSM-IV) and DSM-5, released in 2013. The authors, led by Dr Charles Hoge of the Walter Reed [...]The post Reclassification of PTSD diagnosis potentially excludes soldiers diagnosed under previous criteria appeared first on PsyPost.
Reduction of tau protein improves symptoms in model of severe childhood epilepsy Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes have shown that reducing brain levels of the protein tau effectively blocks the development of disease in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe intractable form of childhood epilepsy. This therapeutic strategy not only suppressed seizure activity and premature death, but also improved cognitive and behavioral abnormalities that can [...]The post Reduction of tau protein improves symptoms in model of severe childhood epilepsy appeared first on PsyPost.
Research shows babies know the difference between animate and inanimate objects Does a baby know that a dog can jump a fence while a school bus can’t? Can a toddler grasp that a cat can avoid colliding with a wall, while a table being pushed into a wall can’t? A new study from Concordia shows that infants as young as 10-months old can tell the difference [...]The post Research shows babies know the difference between animate and inanimate objects appeared first on PsyPost.
Digital literacy reduces cognitive decline in older adults, experts find Researchers have found a link between digital literacy and a reduction in cognitive decline, according to a study published in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Medical Sciences on July 8th. Led by Andre Junqueira Xavier at the Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina, this is the first major study to show that digital literacy, or the [...]The post Digital literacy reduces cognitive decline in older adults, experts find appeared first on PsyPost.
Decline in daily functioning related to decreased brain activity in Alzheimer’s Decline in daily functioning associated with Alzheimer’s disease is related to alterations in activity in certain regions of the brain, according to a study published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living—or an inability to perform high-level daily activities such as calculating finances, remembering appointments [...]The post Decline in daily functioning related to decreased brain activity in Alzheimer’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Workaholism: The addiction of this century A recent study from the University of Bergen shows that 8.3 per cent of the Norwegian work force is addicted to work to the point where it becomes a health issue. In spite of the many positive aspects of work, some people are unable to detach from it – working excessively and compulsively. These are [...]The post Workaholism: The addiction of this century appeared first on PsyPost.
PTSD can develop even without memory of the trauma: study There are many forms of memory and only some of these may be critical for the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reports a new study by researchers at the University at Albany and the University of California Los Angeles. Their findings, published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry, suggest that even with no [...]The post PTSD can develop even without memory of the trauma: study appeared first on PsyPost.
A new key to understanding depression New research looks at the possible link between inflammation and depression.
Vitamin D tied to Alzheimer's risk Low vitamin D is associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.
Parkinson’s disease and depression often go hand in hand Both conditions are associated with a shortage of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that helps regulate movement and control the brain's pleasure center.
Sloppy And Scattered: This Is Your Brain On Grief I'm working to tame the messy jumble of muck in my head that spits out phrases like "messy jumble of muck" because, frankly, muck isn't something that jumbles, is it?...
The Difference Between Love and Love Addiction Even for a securely attached personality, falling in love can be temporarily disorienting. We are all familiar with phrases such as “she took my breath away” or “he swept me off my feet.” Usually, however, this initial whirlwind is followed by a period of trust-building and the establishment of true...