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A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding a DNA base here or removing a DNA base there could have much of an effect on our health. In fact, such insertions and deletions can dramatically alter biological function, leading to diseases from autism to cancer. Still, it is [...]The post A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape appeared first on PsyPost.
DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer’s disease A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer’s disease. DNA methylation is a biochemical alteration of the building blocks of DNA and is one of the markers that indicate whether the DNA is open [...]The post DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Men viewed more favorably than women when seeking work-life balance While some suggest that flexible work arrangements have the potential to reduce workplace inequality, a new study finds these arrangements may exacerbate discrimination based on parental status and gender. Study author Christin Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at Furman University, analyzed the reactions both men and women received when making flexible work requests — [...]The post Men viewed more favorably than women when seeking work-life balance appeared first on PsyPost.
Study identifies ‘bonus effect’ for certain multiracial daters While previous research has documented the existence of a racial hierarchy within the dating world with white women and men on top, a new study finds that in certain circumstances multiracial daters are actually seen as more desirable than individuals from all other racial groups, including whites. “The most interesting and surprising finding from our [...]The post Study identifies ‘bonus effect’ for certain multiracial daters appeared first on PsyPost.
New study profiles ‘the cutters’ — those who perform underground genital castrations New research shows being raised in a devoutly Christian household and growing up on a farm are two defining characteristics of “the cutters” — what the eunuch subculture calls people who perform medically unnecessary genital castrations on others. “Individuals, who perform surgeries without a license, put themselves at serious legal risk — in addition to [...]The post New study profiles ‘the cutters’ — those who perform underground genital castrations appeared first on PsyPost.
Gestalt of Self Self is a Gestalt: an illusory Oneness made of (information) parts....
#112 Being Physically and Emotionally Present If we want to be connected to our children in loving ways we need to spend time with them—a lot of time! This statement isn’t meant to make people feel guilty. It just happens to be true. In order to connect with another person you have to spend time with...
Answering Children’s Questions about Foster Care Recently, a colleague came to me for advice on addressing a very tough question from a child: Why don’t I live with mommy anymore? With roughly 400,000 children in out-of-home placements in the United States, this is a question that gets asked by hundreds of thousands of children every year....
Targeted brain stimulation aids stroke recovery in mice, Stanford scientists find When investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine applied light-driven stimulation to nerve cells in the brains of mice that had suffered strokes several days earlier, the mice showed significantly greater recovery in motor ability than mice that had experienced strokes but whose brains weren’t stimulated. These findings, which will be published online Aug. [...]The post Targeted brain stimulation aids stroke recovery in mice, Stanford scientists find appeared first on PsyPost.
Study examines how genes, gender and environment influence substance abuse Social integration, including strong family ties, can protect one’s well-being and even reduce the impact high-risk genes have on health. Scientists call this phenomenon a gene-environment interaction. An Indiana University study focusing on substance abuse, however, found that a three-way interplay of gender, genetics and social integration produced the different outcomes for men and women. [...]The post Study examines how genes, gender and environment influence substance abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
Children as young as 6 are biased toward their social group when combating unfairness Just about every parent is familiar with the signs: the crying, the stomping feet and pouting lips, all of which are usually followed by a collapse to the floor and a wailed insistence that, “It’s not fair!” While most people – including many parents – see such tantrums merely as part of growing up, a [...]The post Children as young as 6 are biased toward their social group when combating unfairness appeared first on PsyPost.
Visual ‘gist’ helps us figure out where a crowd is looking Have you ever seen a crowd of people looking off into the distance, perhaps toward a passing biker or up to the top of a building? There’s a good chance you looked there, too, instantly, even without paying attention to the individuals in the group. How can we tell where a crowd is looking with [...]The post Visual ‘gist’ helps us figure out where a crowd is looking appeared first on PsyPost.
Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults’ performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report. The findings involved 108 adults between the ages of 55 and 79 years of age, 61 of whom attended hatha yoga classes. The others met for the same number and [...]The post Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults appeared first on PsyPost.
Myth: Good Relationships Require More Effort Than They’re Worth When NASA launches a space vehicle, it uses about 90% of its fuel getting beyond the earth’s atmosphere. After it clears the pull of this gravitational force, considerably less fuel is required, allowing it to travel great distances expending much less energy. This principle also applies to relationships. The early...
New research explores the red v. blue state knowledge about abortion A new national survey reveals that the political divide among red-versus-blue states does not support the hypothesis that knowledge about abortion and health is shaped by the state in which one lives. Research led by Danielle Bessett, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of sociology, was presented at the 109th Meeting of the American Sociological [...]The post New research explores the red v. blue state knowledge about abortion appeared first on PsyPost.
Life after prison: Research analyzes ex-offenders’ stigma management Todd Callais, an assistant professor of sociology at UC Blue Ash College, presented his findings on how ex-inmates cope with life after prison at the American Sociological Association (ASA) Annual Meeting, held Aug. 16-19 in San Francisco. As part of his three-year research for a new book, Callais conducted in-depth interviews with a total of [...]The post Life after prison: Research analyzes ex-offenders’ stigma management appeared first on PsyPost.
Happiness in schizophrenia: Research finds mental illness doesn’t preclude enjoying life Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. The study is published online this week in the journal Schizophrenia Research. [...]The post Happiness in schizophrenia: Research finds mental illness doesn’t preclude enjoying life appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers obtain key insights into how the internal body clock is tuned Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA. The internal body clocks, called circadian clocks, regulate the daily “rhythms” of many bodily functions, from waking and sleeping to body temperature and hunger. They are largely “tuned” [...]The post Researchers obtain key insights into how the internal body clock is tuned appeared first on PsyPost.
Emotions and eating: a marketer’s dream? By Nitika Garg, UNSW Australia Business School Both research and popular media tell us that emotions and eating are intrinsically related. How many times have we seen a character in a TV show reaching for the ice-cream tub when feeling particularly down or after a breakup? What is it about sadness that leads to such [...]The post Emotions and eating: a marketer’s dream? appeared first on PsyPost.
Kids' brains reorganize when learning math skills How well kids make the shift to memory-based problem-solving is known to predict their ultimate math achievement.