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5 Insights You Should Know About Creative Pairs New research into how pairs create collaboratively is surprising and enlightening. From John Lennon to Penn Jillette, from William Wordsworth to Madame Curie, individuals working in creative duos have changed the world.
Live for today This blog post is inspired by a recent comment I received. The question was posed – how do we continue to keep on going when we know that inevitably we will fall victim to our episodes? I have rapid cycling bipolar disorder, my episodes of mania, depression, or mixed states...
What Gets in the Way of You Reaching For “A hero is an ordinary individual who finds the strength to persevere and endure in spite of overwhelming obstacles.” - Christopher Reeve I hope you read the last article about why your potential is unlimited. This awareness and acknowledgement that you are capable of immensely more is a first step toward...
Finding Your Way through Adversity On my last day of inpatient psychiatric treatment, I nervously asked the hospital’s program director if I could apply for a position there. I felt a thousand times better than the day I was brought into the system, which was in an ambulance after a suicide attempt. I felt like...
When it comes to depressed men in the military, does height matter? Both short and tall men in the military are more at risk for depression than their uniformed colleagues of average height, a new study finds. This study was published today in the open access journal SAGE Open. Despite the researchers’ original hypothesis that shorter men in the military would be more psychologically vulnerable than their taller [...]The post When it comes to depressed men in the military, does height matter? appeared first on PsyPost.
Dogs get jealous: Study suggests primordial origins for the ‘green-eyed monster’ This will not surprise most dog owners: Dogs can act jealous, finds a new study from the University of California, San Diego. Darwin thought so, too. But emotion researchers have been arguing for years whether jealousy requires complex cognition. And some scientists have even said that jealousy is an entirely social construct – not seen [...]The post Dogs get jealous: Study suggests primordial origins for the ‘green-eyed monster’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for themselves but hurts them when they are negotiating in a situation that requires compromise. Additionally, men who are more attractive are better collaborators compared to less attractive men. Those are among the findings outlined in a just published paper co-authored by Michael P. Haselhuhnand Elaine M. Wong, [...]The post Wide-faced men negotiate nearly $2,200 larger signing bonus appeared first on PsyPost.
Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer’s disease: Using a cancer drug Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer’s disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer’s. Their study appears in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Carlo Ballatore, Kurt [...]The post Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer’s disease: Using a cancer drug appeared first on PsyPost.
Sleep deprivation may increase susceptibility to false memories Not getting enough sleep may increase the likelihood of forming false memories, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. In a study conducted by psychological scientist Steven J. Frenda of the University of California, Irvine and colleagues, sleep-deprived people who viewed photographs of a crime being committed and then read false information about [...]The post Sleep deprivation may increase susceptibility to false memories appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. Now biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study that [...]The post Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors appeared first on PsyPost.
Targeting the brain to treat obesity Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of obesity and dementia reside in the brain, according to a paper from American University’s Center for Behavioral Neuroscience. In the paper, researchers make the case for treating obesity with therapies aimed at areas of the brain responsible for memory and learning. Furthermore, treatments that focus [...]The post Targeting the brain to treat obesity appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Big picture’ thinking doesn’t always lead people to indulge less, study says Buy the latest electronic gizmo du jour, or use that money to fix a leaky roof? Go out with friends, or stay home to catch-up on work to meet that looming deadline? And after you’ve finished that big project, do you treat yourself to a slice of chocolate cake or settle for a piece of [...]The post ‘Big picture’ thinking doesn’t always lead people to indulge less, study says appeared first on PsyPost.
Why does the teenage brain need more sleep? By Michelle A Miller, University of Warwick and Francesco Cappuccio, University of Warwick Throughout our lives we experience changes in sleep patterns and in the amount of sleep we need. While babies sleep between 16 and 18 hours per day, this is reduced to approximately seven to eight hours on average in adults. Teenagers tend [...]The post Why does the teenage brain need more sleep? appeared first on PsyPost.
Pray for Others and Stop Pitying Yourself When I’m stressed out and overwhelmed by anxiety, I picture the red parlor piano my grandparents had in their basement in New York. It was always out of tune but my cousins and I couldn’t resist it. They actually knew how to play the piano, but no matter what they...
Dogs Feel Jealousy and Don't Like Being Dissed A new study shows dogs display jealousy (snapping, getting between their owner and an object) when owners show affection to a stuffed dog, but not when they show affection to nonsocial objects. While some believe dogs and other animals don't display cognitively complex emotions such as jealousy, arguments from evolutionary continuity show this is not a surprising result.
How stress hormones promote brain's building of negative memories Scientists have discovered a key component to better understanding how traumatic memories may be strengthened in women. Their study's findings suggest that developing clinical treatments that could lower norepinephrine levels immediately following a traumatic event might offer a way to prevent this memory-enhancing mechanism from occurring.
3 Ways to Reclaim Your Work Life If you’re stressed, depressed and dreading Mondays, you’re probably working in a toxic interpersonal environment that has started to take its toll on your physical and mental health. In my recent research on workplace bullying, I have discovered a baffling phenomenon: Targets often don’t realize they are being bullied for...
When It Comes To Togetherness In Relationships, More Isn’t There’s not much question that an awful lot of relationships suffer from a deficiency of quality time together, a condition that greatly diminishes the experience of connection shared by the couple. Other responsibilities and commitments have a way of winning the competition for our time, leaving us feeling resentful, frustrated,...
Pay It Back AND Pay It Forward Does the concept of "the selfish gene" necessitate that organisms like humans are a bunch of selfish knuckleheads? Is that what evolutionary psychology is all about? Well, not quite! Read on to see how Dawkin's "selfish gene" take on what it means to be human actually sets the stage for us to understand some of the most self-less behaviors on Planet Earth.
Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease: Using a cancer drug Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. However, scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's.