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How the Brain Creates a Dependence On Opioids Opioids have been around for a very long time, and are used as painkillers to help patients cope with pain post-surgery. They have both helped and harmed people, alleviating chronic pain for people who have undergone invasive surgeries, but also being the source of dangerous addictions for those who have...
Are You a Type A, B, or D Personality? There are 3 types of personalities that have been related to physical health and disease. What are they?
Why Do People Give Unwanted Advice? It helps to remember how little we really see when we initially engage other people, or even people that we know fairly well. And while it seems like recognizing the limits of our knowledge would make it harder to connect, the opposite is really true. See, when we assume that...
Driving brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touch In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice provides the first direct evidence that the brain's 'gamma' rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch.
Haven't my neurons seen this before? What happens in the brain with familiar pictures? The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. Researchers found that when subjects were exposed to familiar and unfamiliar images in a rapid succession, their neurons -- especially the inhibitory neurons -- fired much more strongly and selectively to images the subject had seen many times before.
Study suggests repurposing anti-depressant medication to target medulloblastoma An international research team reports in Nature Medicine a novel molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the new pathway may help combat one of the most common brain cancers in children. The multi-institutional group, led by scientists at Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute (CBDI) at Cincinnati [...]The post Study suggests repurposing anti-depressant medication to target medulloblastoma appeared first on PsyPost.
Gamma brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touch By striking up the right rhythm in the right brain region at the right time, Brown University neuroscientists report in Nature Neuroscience that they managed to endow mice with greater touch sensitivity than other mice, making hard-to-perceive vibrations suddenly more vivid to them. The findings offer the first direct evidence that “gamma” brainwaves in the cortex affect [...]The post Gamma brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touch appeared first on PsyPost.
The Importance of Getting Help for Fear and Anxieties Getting professional help for dealing with your persistent fears and anxieties is the single most important step in your recovery. Many people are reluctant to get the help they need for various reasons. Here are 6 reasons on why getting help is important. 1. Learn New Strategies: Getting professional help...
Stanford bioengineers close to brewing opioid painkillers without using opium from poppies For centuries poppy plants have been grown to provide opium, the compound from which morphine and other important medicines such as oxycodone are derived. Now bioengineers at Stanford have hacked the DNA of yeast, reprograming these simple cells to make opioid-based medicines via a sophisticated extension of the basic brewing process that makes beer. Led [...]The post Stanford bioengineers close to brewing opioid painkillers without using opium from poppies appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number manyfold. However, simply recording the neural activity does not automatically lead to a clearer understanding of how the brain works. In a new review paper published in Nature Neuroscience, Carnegie Mellon [...]The post Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Haven’t my neurons seen this before?’ How neurons respond to sequences of familiar objects The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond [...]The post ‘Haven’t my neurons seen this before?’ How neurons respond to sequences of familiar objects appeared first on PsyPost.
Memory wars: Is there scientific evidence for repressed memories? A scientific study that investigated whether the “memory wars” among psychologists was at an end appears to have received an answer: it’s not. The “war” has been fought over the Freudian concept of repressed memories, in which traumatic events are unconsciously suppressed in the mind. The debate over repressed memories peaked in the 1990s, when [...]The post Memory wars: Is there scientific evidence for repressed memories? appeared first on PsyPost.
Do Empaths Really Exist? Recently, a friend of mine who is a psychologist shared with me during a conversation about career counseling that she has the ability to sense the emotions of others. At first, I thought she was talking about the construct of empathy, an ability most helping professionals seem to (or at...
Laughter in the Face of Mental Illness This weekend, I had the opportunity to see the comedy/spoken word one man show Fruitcake: Ten Commandments of the Psych Ward, by Rob Gee. It was a wonderful production. The performance was witty, energetic, engaging, and wickedly funny. This show was about the lessons Rob has learned from his time...
Sunday Self-Care Round-Up 8.24.14 I’m starting a new round-up series on Weightless that includes all kinds of posts, which explore taking kinder care of ourselves — from appreciating our bodies to getting to know ourselves better to feeling our feelings to saying no to saying yes to savoring supportive, healthy relationships. Because self-care helps...
Things You Might Say to a Severe Narcissist A certain psychological position and understanding can help one weather, manage and recover from narcissistic abuse. What is so damaging about narcissistic abuse is that it can take a toll on identity, world view, confidence and hope. This kind of difficulty of the ego or the self can impact many aspects of life, but it can be turned around.
You Have the Right to Say No So many of us end up saying yes to activities, events and even ideas only to regret it. We end up answering questions that are too personal or downright rude. We let people into our lives who don’t deserve to be there. Or we say no, and then worry —...
Does Pretend Play Really Create Child Development? If pretend play causes development, then we should prescribe pretend play for struggling children; but if pretend play merely marks development, then all the therapist-guided pretend play in the world ain’t gonna change a child’s trajectory....
New Study Affirms 4 Very Old-Fashioned Guidelines for a Good Marriage New research on 1,000 Americans over 5 years upholds some age-old rules about marriage. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Still Thinking About Your Ex? Why It’s Bad News for Your Current Partner Kissing: Its Vital Role in Choosing and Keeping Partners How Just One Night’s Poor Sleep Can Hurt a Relationship 10 Psychology Studies Every Lover Should Know Movie-and-Talk: Can This Simple Exercise Help Save a Marriage?
Psychopath, Interrupted An account from the 1940s purports to have cured a psychopath with an "accelerated" technique.