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Today I Love Discussing Plans Today I love discussing plans, examining possibilities, exploring potentials, and contemplating decisions. I love that I have a plan for investing and that it is not set in stone but … ...
New mech­an­ism un­der­ly­ing epi­lepsy found Prolonged epileptic seizures may cause serious problems that will continue for the rest of a patient’s life. As a result of a seizure, neural connections of the brain may be rewired in an incorrect way. This may result in seizures that are difficult to control with medication. Mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not entirely known, which makes current therapies ineffective in some patients.
Changes in RNA splicing: A new mechanism for genetic risk in schizophrenia New research has identified sections of DNA associated with altered regulation of gene expression underlying schizophrenia. The implicated loci contribute to schizophrenia risk by affecting alternative splicing, part of the process that translates the same DNA code into multiple different proteins.
Brain imaging headband measures how our minds align when we communicate Past research has revealed that our brains synchronize when listening to the same idea or story. Now, biomedical engineers have developed a tool to better understand this phenomenon.
If You Could Just Take a Pill and Be Sober, Would You? One of the first things I learned in AA was: “Physicians who are familiar with alcoholism agree there is no such thing as making a normal drinker out of an … ...
What Prompts You to Quarrel? “We are never so much disposed to quarrel with others as when we are dissatisfied with ourselves.” – William Hazlitt Sometimes you just want to pick a fight. You might not even know why you feel so inclined to argue, only that you do. Once the words … ...
Shedding Friends: Who Does It and When Does It Happen? What happens to your friendships over the course of your life? Do you accumulate close friends over time or shed them? Does it matter if you are single or married? … ...
Are Your Creative Obstacles Really Obstacles? So often we convince ourselves that we can’t create. We might have one—big!—reason. Or we might have a litany. We think we’re too old (or too  young). We think we … ...
Do You Look Like Your Name? People Can Match Names to Faces of Strangers With Surprising Accuracy Computers can also be programmed to match names and faces, study says
Tired of Putting Things Off, and of Being Seen as a Bore? “Another day gone. What are you going to do about it?” Is this what you want to know from your latest watch?
Using marijuana to treat chronic pain Use of marijuana for pain relief could reduce the number of opioid painkiller addicts.
Video Modeling for Youth with Autism or ADHD Video modeling is an evidence-based practice for children with autism spectrum disorder. (See the module on video modeling from the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders here.) Video modeling is using video to model (or show) viewers particular skills, such as communication or … ...
Study: Low testosterone levels predict a committed relationship status in young men Testosterone levels influence whether men become engaged in a committed, monogamous relationship or not, according to research published in the journal Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology. Previous research has found that men with one long-term partner tend to have lower testosterone levels than single men or men with multiple partners. However, the direction of this [...]
Study: Emotional brain states can linger and influence your subsequent memory Emotional states can linger in the brain and enhance the memory formation of events many minutes later, suggests research published in Nature Neuroscience, even when the subsequent events are unrelated to the evoked emotion. The study found that inducing an emotional state enhanced participants’ ability to recall neutral images 9 to 33 minutes later. The [...]
Air pollution exposure may increase risk of dementia Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disease that eventually strips sufferers of their ability to remember, communicate and live independently. By 2050, it is projected to affect nearly 14 million Americans and their families, with an economic cost of one trillion dollars – more than the estimated combined total for treating heart disease and cancer. [...]
Claim of link between intelligence and cannabis use in adolescence provides fresh headache for researchers Children with high and medium academic ability at age 11 are more likely to use cannabis in late adolescence compared to children with low academic ability, according to a new study published in BMJ Open. The researchers, from University College London, examined the school records of more than 6,000 children. Their analysis showed that children [...]
Study: Don’t assume a MMORPG gamer’s avatar reflects his or her offline personality New research suggests that a gamer’s offline personality isn’t always the starting point for their avatar customization. The study in Computers in Human Behavior examined a specific genre of computer games known as massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs), in which a large number of players interact with one another in a virtual online world. [...]
On shared false memories: what lies behind the Mandela effect Would you trust a memory that felt as real as all your other memories, and if other people confirmed that they remembered it too? What if the memory turned out to be false? This scenario was named the ‘Mandela effect’ by the self-described ‘paranormal consultant’ Fiona Broome after she discovered that other people shared her (false) [...]
The making of music: Study proposes new theory for evolution of infant-directed song These days, it’s a territory mostly dominated by the likes of Raffi and the Wiggles, but there’s new evidence that lullabies, play songs, and other music for babies and toddlers may have some deep evolutionary roots. A new theory paper, co-authored by Graduate School of Education doctoral student Samuel Mehr and Assistant Professor of Psychology [...]
The human brain makes fructose, researchers discover – here’s why that might be a big deal Researchers at Yale University have discovered that the brain is capable of making fructose – a simple sugar, usually found in fruit, vegetables and honey. Not all sugars are equal. Glucose is a simple sugar that provides energy for the cells in your body. Fructose has a less important physiological role and has been repeatedly [...]