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Peak Experiences in Psilocybin Users A recent study of intensely positive experiences in people who have used psilocybin found that some users had experienced profoundly altered states of consciousness, including visual hallucinations even when not under the direct influence of the drug. Perhaps psilocybin might have lasting effects on a person’s ability to enter altered states of consciousness without drugs.
What is Love: Are You Made For Each Other or Are You on a Journey? What your view of love does to your relationship.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Falling in Love Takes One-Fifth of a Second How Just One Night’s Poor Sleep Can Hurt a Relationship Brain Map of Love and Desire Still Thinking About Your Ex? Why It’s Bad News for Your Current Partner 10 Psychology Studies Every Lover Should Know
Happiness With Others: Practice Win–Win You will undoubtedly face happiness-challenging differences and disagreements at times in all your significant relationships. How you handle them will go a long way to determining both the quality of these relationships and the amount of pleasure you derive from them. See how to turn your relationship differences and disagreements into diamonds.
Stop Saying “I am sorry” Why do women apologize more frequently than men? Well, I have my theories. This older article at Scientific American is interesting too. I hear women say they are sorry several times a day. They say it when they cross your path in the grocery store. They say it when their pen rolls...
The ‘Weakness Factor’: Men and Depression I’ve found that it’s much easier for women to say, “I’m depressed,” than it is for men. This has more to do with what I call the “weakness factor,” in which men struggle to admit something’s wrong with them or acknowledge something they perceive as a sign of weakness. Men...
A blood test for suicide? Alterations to a single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person’s risk of attempting suicide. The discovery, described online in The American Journal of Psychiatry, suggests that changes in a [...]The post A blood test for suicide? Alterations to a single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt appeared first on PsyPost.
Research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer’s or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research involved investigating the components of memory using a combination of tests and neuroimaging – a method that could be [...]The post Research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems appeared first on PsyPost.
Many depressed preschoolers still suffer in later school years Children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers are likely to suffer from depression as school-age children and young adolescents, new research shows. Depressed preschoolers were 2.5 times more likely to suffer from the condition in elementary and middle school than kids who were not depressed at very young ages, according to researchers at Washington University School of [...]The post Many depressed preschoolers still suffer in later school years appeared first on PsyPost.
Older adults are at risk of financial abuse Nearly one in every twenty elderly American adults is being financially exploited – often by their own family members. This burgeoning public health crisis especially affects poor and black people. It merits the scrutiny of clinicians, policy makers, researchers, and any citizen who cares about the dignity and well-being of older Americans, says Dr. Janey [...]The post Older adults are at risk of financial abuse appeared first on PsyPost.
There’s No Such Thing as an Adverse Childhood Adverse (adˈvərs,ˈadvərs/adjective): preventing success or development; harmful; unfavorable. Definitions matter, because the words we apply to our lives influence whether we feel hopeful or discouraged. Can a childhood be adverse? Events during childhood can certainly be harmful and unfavorable. And yes, painful formative experiences often limit success and development along conventional avenues. In my...
Let Go & Free Yourself: 21 Strategies “In the end, these things matter most: How well did you love?  How fully did you live? How deeply did you let go?” ~Buddha Therapists, coaches, and yoga instructors love to tell us to, “Let it go!”  Sounds divine, yet ambiguous… What exactly is involved in the process of letting...
Long-Term Couples Develop Interconnected Memory Systems New research from Macquarie University in Australia reveals that intimate couples become part of an interpersonal cognitive system where each is dependent on the other to fill in certain memory gaps. ...
The History Of Dyslexia Dyslexia The History The following is the history of something I’ve dealt with all my life.  The fact that I can write about it in a semi-coherent manner is proof that it does not have to be the end of an academic career.  I was once told: I would never...
What to Know about Children’s Nighttime Bedwetting Toilet training can be a stressful process. This is particularly the case for children who achieve daytime dryness but continue to wet themselves — and the bed — overnight. It may leave you wondering what’s normal and what you can do to help your child. Nighttime wetting is one of...
Your Cognitive Positioning System A cognitive positioning system, like a GPS, shows us where we are. But our CPS subconsciously places us there.
How is depression related to dementia? A new study by neuropsychiatric researchers at Rush University Medical Center gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia. The study is published in the July 30, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Studies have shown that people with symptoms of depression are more likely to develop [...]The post How is depression related to dementia? appeared first on PsyPost.
Teen insomnia is linked with depression and anxiety A study of high school students by University of Adelaide psychology researchers has shed new light on the links between insomnia-related mental health conditions among teens. School of Psychology PhD student Pasquale Alvaro surveyed more than 300 Australian high school students aged 12-18 to better understand their sleep habits, mental health condition and the time of [...]The post Teen insomnia is linked with depression and anxiety appeared first on PsyPost.
New research shows lack of motivation affects cognitive performance in schizophrenia New research from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows a significant relationship between motivational deficit and poor cognitive performance in people with schizophrenia. The study, published online in JAMA Psychiatry, is one of the first to link the two symptoms and suggests that understanding the impact of motivational impairment is an important step [...]The post New research shows lack of motivation affects cognitive performance in schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuro researchers advocate for a shift in thinking for stroke rehabilitation With the advent of non-surgical modalities, stimulation of the brain has become a popular science and researchers must work to ensure systematic methods for consistent results in the study of stroke rehabilitation. A new study out today in The Neuroscientist discusses a systematic shift in perspective and suggests that chronically stimulating premotor areas (PMAs) of the brain [...]The post Neuro researchers advocate for a shift in thinking for stroke rehabilitation appeared first on PsyPost.
Money talks when it comes to acceptability of ‘sin’ companies, study reveals Companies who make their money in the “sin” industries such as the tobacco, alcohol and gaming industries typically receive less attention from institutional investors and financial analysts. But new research shows social norms and attitudes towards these types of businesses are subject to compromise when their share price looks to be on the rise. A [...]The post Money talks when it comes to acceptability of ‘sin’ companies, study reveals appeared first on PsyPost.