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White Lies Make Social Networks Stronger. Selfish Lies Tear Them Apart. "Lying is a bad thing – this is what mentors, parents and teachers tell us. But there is no society without lies."...
McDonald's and Culture Food and drink are culturally variable, and so is the design of the places that offer them. A general nod to “cultural differences” does not explain much, especially when the purveying corporation is the same globalized one.
The Fundamental Psychological Bias That Determines Your Politics Are you on the right or the left? It could be down to this basic psychological bias.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Confirmation Bias: Why It’s Hard to Change Your Mind How a Psychological Bias Makes Groups Feel Good About Themselves And Discredit Others The Belief in a Just World: A Fundamental Delusion Why Society Doesn’t Change: The System Justification Bias The Hindsight Bias: I Knew It All Along!
Psychology Around the Net: August 2, 2014 Think you chose those shoes on your own? Are you making decisions for you or others? What about fatal attraction — it sounds scary, but could you be in the midst of it? Find the answers to these and more questions in this week’s Psychology Around the Net. How Marketers...
Welcome to the Happiness Highway The inaugural blog for the Happiness Rx: a tool to make your life a bit more joyful everyday
Clues to curbing obesity found in neuronal 'sweet spot' Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from being activated in a small part of the brain, according to a new study.
One reason brain tumors are more common in men New research helps explain why brain tumors occur more often in males and frequently are more harmful. For example, glioblastomas, the most common malignant brain tumors, are diagnosed twice as often in males, who suffer greater cognitive impairments than females and do not survive as long. The researchers found that retinoblastoma protein, a protein known to reduce cancer risk, is significantly less active in male brain cells than in female brain cells.
Is it really a concussion? Symptoms overlap with neck injuries so diagnosis is tough call Athletes and others reporting cognitive difficulties after a head injury are usually diagnosed as having had a concussion. But is it really a concussion? A new study published by University at Buffalo medical faculty finds that many of the same symptoms are common to concussions and to injuries to the neck and/or balance system, known [...]The post Is it really a concussion? Symptoms overlap with neck injuries so diagnosis is tough call appeared first on PsyPost.
Unintended consequences: More high school math, science linked to more dropouts As U.S. high schools beef up math and science requirements for graduation, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that more rigorous academics drive some students to drop out. The research team reported in the June/July issue of the journal Educational Researcher that policies increasing the number of required high school math and [...]The post Unintended consequences: More high school math, science linked to more dropouts appeared first on PsyPost.
New mothers still excessively sleepy after four months New mums are being urged to be cautious about returning to work too quickly, after a QUT study found one in two were still excessively sleepy four months after giving birth. Dr Ashleigh Filtness, from QUT’s Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q), studied the sleep patterns and tiredness of postpartum mums and found despite new [...]The post New mothers still excessively sleepy after four months appeared first on PsyPost.
Clues to curbing obesity found in neuronal ‘sweet spot’ Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from being activated in a small part of the brain, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers. Published in the Aug. 1 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI), the study showed that when [...]The post Clues to curbing obesity found in neuronal ‘sweet spot’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Potential basis for the treatment and prevention of Parkinson’s disease Parkinson’s disease affects neurons in the Substantia nigra brain region – their mitochondrial activity ceases and the cells die. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics show that supplying D-lactate or glycolate, two products of the gene DJ-1, can stop and even counteract this process: Adding the substances to cultured [...]The post Potential basis for the treatment and prevention of Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Society bloomed with gentler personalities and more feminine faces Modern humans appear in the fossil record about 200,000 years ago, but it was only about 50,000 years ago that making art and advanced tools became widespread. A new study appearing Aug. 1 in the journal Current Anthropology finds that human skulls changed in ways that indicate a lowering of testosterone levels at around the same time [...]The post Society bloomed with gentler personalities and more feminine faces appeared first on PsyPost.
Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors Writing down fears, emotions and the benefits of a cancer diagnosis may improve health outcomes for Asian-American breast cancer survivors, according to a study conducted by a researcher at the University of Houston (UH). “The key to developing an expressive writing intervention is the writing instruction. Otherwise, writing is just like a journal recording facts [...]The post Expressive writing may help breast cancer survivors appeared first on PsyPost.
Consequences of Emotional Abuse I come from a family where abuse has had a generational continuity. My grandfather abused my grandmother. My grandmother abused her son, daughter-in-law and other people. (She threw food at me once.) My father bullies his wife and daughter. My mother is emotionally violent to me. I go crazy and...
5 Ways to Start Growing into Your Best Self “I want to grow. I want to be better. You Grow. We all grow. We’re made to grow.You either evolve or you disappear.” ― Tupac Shakur When it comes to being at your best it’s all about personal growth. Think of what is possible if you are willing to learn new skills...
Breakthrough in understanding chronic pain could lead to new treatments By Amanda C de C Williams, University College London Chronic pain, defined as disabling pain that persists despite attempts at treatment and often without obvious cause, has become a serious challenge for health professionals. It is not surprising that someone suffering from this level of pain might become depressed, but most studies consider depression a [...]The post Breakthrough in understanding chronic pain could lead to new treatments appeared first on PsyPost.
Social workers should be paid and trained like doctors By Lena Dominelli, Durham University Social workers deal with messy, complex and ambiguous situations where off-the-peg solutions are often irrelevant. Take a mother who wants to feed a hungry baby, but her fridge is empty because she can’t afford milk. How do you help her? Understanding the structural lack of opportunity that some people have [...]The post Social workers should be paid and trained like doctors appeared first on PsyPost.
Games on the brain can take virtual experiences to real world By Mark Griffiths, Nottingham Trent University Back in the early 1990s, I used to play the video game Tetris on my Nintendo Game Boy. I was really good at it – if I do say so myself – and I used to play for hours every day. When I went to bed I would see [...]The post Games on the brain can take virtual experiences to real world appeared first on PsyPost.
First stage trial of new vaccine offers glimmer of hope to Parkinson’s sufferers By Patrick Lewis, University of Reading Affiris, a biotech company based in Austria, and the Michael J Fox Foundation, have announced the latest results of a vaccine they have been developing to treat Parkinson’s disease. Following the first stage of clinical trials, the results show promise of a vaccine that can combat the neurodegenerative disorder. [...]The post First stage trial of new vaccine offers glimmer of hope to Parkinson’s sufferers appeared first on PsyPost.