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Blood Test for Suicide: Changes In One Gene Predict Suicide Risk Genetic test predicts suicidality with 90% accuracy in people at severe risk.Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Breakthrough A Blood Test for Depression Longevity Gene May Enhance Cognition Higher Risk of Mental Illness for Those With Older Fathers High Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Brain Decay
Whether Biology or Trauma, Mental Illness Requires Care not In a beautiful article for Nature, David Adams recently wrote, “Psychiatric research has yet to provide a single reliable biomarker to aid diagnosis and treatment. Self-reported symptoms and their subjective interpretations remain the basis for clinical diagnosis. Drug companies have walked away.” For years I have taught and will continue...
Dealing with Depression: Mindfully Turning Toward Negative Thoughts & Does this sound familiar? I don’t want to feel this way. When I’m anxious, I start thinking of ways I can be in control. So many little things have been bothering me lately, which only makes me madder at myself for letting them bother me. I wish I were different....
ADHD Creates There are people who say that having ADHD makes you creative. And there are those who say that that hasn’t been proven. And there are those who say that ADHD creativity is a myth. I say that creativity is a matter of creating. And creating requires you to be able...
Why bad news dominates the headlines Why are newspapers and TV broadcasts filled with disaster, corruption and incompetence? It may be because we’re drawn to depressing stories without realising, says psychologist Tom Stafford. When you read the news, sometimes it can feel like the only things reported are terrible, depressing events. Why does the media concentrate on the bad things in […]
A One-Minute Course in Anger Management A simple strategy that may keep your anger problem under control.
Making Friends with Your Inner Sex Addict We commonly think of our sex addict self as bad. And indeed the addict part of us does things that harm others and ourselves and that usually go against our deeply held values. We would like to distance ourselves from this part of us, to stamp it out. In poetic...
Photography: Art and Healing Photographic images can be a powerful form of expression for creative people, and also a tool for therapists and anyone to help explore our inner selves. This image by artist Jennifer Moon is titled “A Story of a Girl and a Horse: The Search for Courage.” A news article about an...
Left behind: LGBT homeless youth struggle to survive on the streets Despite the gains made for gay rights in recent years, homeless lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth are struggling to find safe shelter.
Small DNA modifications predict brain's threat response Epigenetic changes to a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain reacts to threats, according to a new study. The results may explain how the well-understood serotonin transporter leaves some individuals more vulnerable than others to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.
Fault trumps gruesome evidence when it comes to punishment Issues of crime and punishment, vengeance and justice date back to the dawn of human history, but it is only in the last few years that scientists have begun exploring the basic nature of the complex neural processes in the brain that underlie these fundamental behaviors. A new brain imaging study has identified the mechanisms involved in balancing blameworthiness and the emotion-driven urge to punish.
90210, Sex and the City: Reading the signs of You know you have problems and you might be depressed when are watching Sex and The City reruns (2008) and Beverly Hills 90201 reruns (2009). The numbers are not when anything aired but when I was lost in depression and watched it. And to be fair, 90210 was from my high school...
What Goes on Inside an Intervention? Interventions have become a household word for the general public, thanks to television shows such as “Celebrity Rehab” and “Intervention.” Although an intervention is not necessary in every situation, some situations benefit greatly from one. Every situation is different, but most interventions do follow a similar structure. An intervention is...
Diagnosing: The 5 Step Empowerment Model Many clinicians who are working in the systems are set up to not have all the information. In the three states I’ve worked in, I’ve never heard of a public agency that pays for diagnostic tools anyway—so I know I’m talking to clients that have often landed diagnoses without ever...
Realistic Expectations for Bipolar Disorder A discussion of the importance of conveying realistic expectation to university students recently diagnosed with bipolar disorder
A 70-year analysis shows Disney is killing nature (in its animated movies) The extinction of experience, nature-deficit disorder, environmental generational amnesia — all of these terms have been used to describe the disconnection between human beings and the natural world. Now, a new study on Disney films confirms what many have suspected: there is a growing trend of “nature disconnection” in Western culture. “Disney films are part [...]The post A 70-year analysis shows Disney is killing nature (in its animated movies) appeared first on PsyPost.
Congressional rift over environmental protection sways public American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar. The gap between conservatives who oppose environmental protection and liberals who support it has risen drastically in the past 20 years, a trend seen [...]The post Congressional rift over environmental protection sways public appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Noise-induced hearing loss alters brain responses to speech Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the brain processes speech, potentially increasing the difficulty in distinguishing speech sounds, according to neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Dallas. In a paper published this week in Ear and Hearing, researchers demonstrated for the first time how noise-induced hearing loss affects the brain’s recognition of speech sounds. [...]The post Study: Noise-induced hearing loss alters brain responses to speech appeared first on PsyPost.
Research reveals pervasive implicit hierarchies for race, religion, and age As much as social equality is advocated in the United States, a new study suggests that besides evaluating their own race and religion most favorably, people share implicit hierarchies for racial, religious, and age groups that may be different from their conscious, explicit attitudes and values. The study findings appear in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [...]The post Research reveals pervasive implicit hierarchies for race, religion, and age appeared first on PsyPost.
Study on social networks finds misinformation is spreading faster online The spread of misinformation through online social networks is becoming an increasingly worrying problem. Researchers in India have now modeled how such fictions and diffuse through those networks. They described details of their research and the taxonomy that could help those who run, regulate and use online social networks better understand how to slow or [...]The post Study on social networks finds misinformation is spreading faster online appeared first on PsyPost.