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Angry bees: Insect aggression boosted by altering brain metabolism Scientists report they can crank up insect aggression simply by interfering with a basic metabolic pathway in the insect brain. Their study, of fruit flies and honey bees, shows a direct, causal link between brain metabolism -- how the brain generates the energy it needs to function -- and aggression.
Our brains judge a face's trustworthiness, even when we can’t see it Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others.
Nuclear Awareness Days Nuclear awareness: we desperately need it. And what better days to begin than the anniversaries of when we bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Moreover, there is much that the US can do to make all of us safer.
Romantic Chemistry (Video) Learnings from the science of love may be useful in treating psychiatric conditions....
Patients with autism spectrum disorder are not sensitive to ‘being imitated’ A Japanese research group led by Prof Norihiro Sadato, a professor of the National Institute for Physiological Sciences (NIPS), National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS), has found that people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have decreased activity in an area in the brain critical for understanding if his/her movement was imitated by others. These results [...]The post Patients with autism spectrum disorder are not sensitive to ‘being imitated’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers boost insect aggression by altering brain metabolism Scientists report they can crank up insect aggression simply by interfering with a basic metabolic pathway in the insect brain. Their study, of fruit flies and honey bees, shows a direct, causal link between brain metabolism (how the brain generates the energy it needs to function) and aggression. The team reports its findings in the Proceedings of the [...]The post Researchers boost insect aggression by altering brain metabolism appeared first on PsyPost.
Our brains judge a face’s trustworthiness — even when we can’t see it Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others. “Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face’s trustworthiness [...]The post Our brains judge a face’s trustworthiness — even when we can’t see it appeared first on PsyPost.
Common chemical in mothers may negatively affect the IQ of their unborn children In some women abnormally high levels of a common and pervasive chemical may lead to adverse effects in their offspring. The study, published recently in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, is the first of its kind to shed light on the possible harmful side effects of perchlorate in mothers and their children. Using data [...]The post Common chemical in mothers may negatively affect the IQ of their unborn children appeared first on PsyPost.
Just one simple question can identify narcissistic people Scientists have developed and validated a new method to identify which people are narcissistic: just ask them. In a series of 11 experiments involving more than 2,200 people of all ages, the researchers found they could reliably identify narcissistic people by asking them this exact question (including the note): To what extent do you agree [...]The post Just one simple question can identify narcissistic people appeared first on PsyPost.
In search for Alzheimer’s drug, a major STEP forward Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered a new drug compound that may help reverse the cognitive deficits of Alzheimer’s disease. Their findings are publishing on August 5 in the open access journal PLOS Biology. The compound, TC-2153, inhibits the negative effects of a protein called STriatal-Enriched tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP), which is key to regulating [...]The post In search for Alzheimer’s drug, a major STEP forward appeared first on PsyPost.
Pump up the music — especially the bass — to make you feel powerful It’s the day of the big game – before heading out to the field, you put on your headphones and blast some music to pump you up. The music seemingly empowers you to do great things. This effect is not all in your head – according to new research, music truly does make us feel [...]The post Pump up the music — especially the bass — to make you feel powerful appeared first on PsyPost.
Marital tension between mom and dad can harm each parent’s bond with child, study finds Children suffer consequences, too, when mom and dad argue or have tension in their relationship, experts warn. Dads, in particular, let the negative emotions and tension from their marriage spill over and harm the bond they have with their child, says a new study’s lead author, psychologist Chrystyna D. Kouros, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The [...]The post Marital tension between mom and dad can harm each parent’s bond with child, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Ways for Parents to Motivate Their Kids for As the summer winds down and stores bring out their back-to-school supplies, parents and children start to feel different emotions about the new school year. Students may feel anxiety about a new school or a new teacher. They may not want to think about homework, tests and the pressures of...
Medication Compliance Now, there are those of us who swear by our psychiatric medications and those that don’t believe in taking anything. It’s your life, your body, your choice. I wouldn’t be where I am today without the aid of psychiatric medications. That is my choice. The goal of medication is to...
4 Simple Agreements That Will Help You Grow into “Death is not the biggest fear we have; our biggest fear is taking the risk to be alive – the risk to be alive and express what we really are.” ― Miguel Ruiz I love to read and believe that knowledge is one way we can transform and grow and as a...
Drug reverses brain deficits of Alzheimer's in mouse model Researchers have discovered a new drug compound that reverses the brain deficits of Alzheimer's disease in an animal model. The compound, TC-2153, inhibits the negative effects of a protein called STtriatal-Enriched tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP), which is key to regulating learning and memory.
New clues to repairing an injured spinal cord Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is -- while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But new research suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits. Such a feat could eventually lead to therapies for the thousands of Americans with severe spinal cord injuries and paralysis. Scientists hope to borrow strategy from simpler animals to repair damaged spinal cord nerves in humans.
Obamacare helping more youth to get mental health treatment Provision allows young people to stay on their parents' health plan until they turn 26, making mental health care more affordable.
One question reveals: Are you a narcissist? Study shows the answer to just one question had the same result as a 40-item questionnaire about narcissism.
You Could Wake Up Convinced You're In a Duplicate World Or, at least, that you're in a duplicate town, house, and hospital. Reduplicative paramnesia victims believe that someone or something has constructed a duplicate structure, that looks exactly like the one they remember being in. What part of the brain can make you think you're on the set of your own life?...