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Musical Training Offsets Some Academic Achievement Gaps, Research Says Music students have improved neural function, learning abilities over time
Your Brain Judges a Face’s Trustworthiness Before You Consciously See It What does a trustworthy face look like? Trustworthiness, along with dominance, is one of the two most fundamental judgements we make about a face in the instant after we see it for the first time. It's so important that our unconscious can processes the trustworthiness of a face in a tiny fraction of a second, even without our conscious mind being aware of seeing the face. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Dogs Recognise Familiar Human Faces in Eye Tracking Experiment Social Rejection Triggers Release of Natural Painkillers in the Brain Patients in Vegetative State Can Respond Emotionally to Loved Ones Brain Changes Associated With Casual Marijuana Use New Study of Improvising Jazz Pianists Shows Similar Brain Circuits Used for Music and Language
I Hocked My First Loogie While Running (and Why OK, let’s just get this out in the open: I hocked my first loogie ever (like, ever ever). A few weeks ago, I ran my first 5k of 2014. Some of you will remember because I was trying hard not to be a little whining baby about having not trained...
Eating Disorders in Men According to the National Eating Disorder Association, 10 million males in the United States will suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some point in their lives. That number is staggering. Even more startling is the fact that men who battle eating disorders are significantly less likely than women...
A Vital Part of Self-Care: Your List of No As I’m reading through The Power of No: Because One Little Word Can Bring Health, Abundance and Happiness by James Altucher and Claudia Azula Altucher, I’ve been thinking about all the things we can say no to. (I’ve already mentioned their book in this post.) Because saying no helps us...
Parents Part of Problem in Distracted Teen Driving, Study Finds Teens often take calls from parents who also use mobile phones while driving, survey reveals
Study: Few Juvenile Suspects Exercise Constitutional Rights During Interrogations Lawyers, parents largely absent during questioning, according to police videos
Guess I'll Go Eat Worms Friends and relatives might be surprised that I think of myself as lonely. But I do, which is why I was so struck by the findings of John Cacioppo, one of the nation's leading experts on the science of loneliness, that suggest the lonely brain is its own worst enemy, seeing social rejection in every interaction -- which sparks a destructive, self-defeating loop.
Best of Our Blogs: August 8, 2014 In every person’s life there is pause. There is the calm before the storm. There are hills and valleys. There is chaos and time for rest. How you interpret moments of perceive stillness can speak volumes of how you live your every day. Do you fill silence with the murmur...
A Question Of ADHD Impact   Like all health issues, an ADHD diagnosis requires that you manifest a certain percentage of the symptoms that define the disorder. But there’s more to it than that. You also have to manifest those symptoms in more than one setting. And still you may not receive a diagnosis. There...
How You View Your Therapist Tells Her Everything She Last week’s cartoon,  about a way to keep track of what good things other people think about you,  is here.  All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2014,  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to get notified of...
Drugs in space and sleepless in the shuttle A fascinating study published in today’s Lancet Neurology reports on sleep deprivation in astronauts but also describes the drugs shuttle crew members use to keep themselves awake and help them fall asleep. The study looked at data from 64 astronauts on 80 space shuttle missions along with 21 astronauts on 13 International Space Station missions, […]
This is Your Brain on Oxygen   Many of us hold our breath unintentionally while engaged in daily tasks such as reading and writing email (a phenomenon called “email apnea” or “screen apnea” 1 ). We simply “forget” to breathe. This deficit of oxygen-flow to the brain can result in headaches, increased stress, loss of...
Want a Divorce? Stop the Emotional Yo-Yo and Be Don’t beat around the bush when asking for divorce. Sheila had been thinking about it for months and she had talked to her girlfriends about it. They were shocked by her admission — she wasn’t sure she loved her husband Jeff any more. Her friends were shocked because, even after...
Do You Have Sensory Processing Disorder? Sensory Processing Disorder or SPD,  is when the “brain has trouble receiving and responding to information that comes in through our senses” (Web MD). This is usually identified in children but can also be seen in adults. According to Matlen, “SPD is a neurological condition that does not allow for normal...
Your Mind On Life: An Unofficial Journal to the First Half Each decade has its own unique challenges and lessons. Like it or not we are forced to change or at least consider changing as we cross new psychological terrain. A 30 second unofficial map of what's possibly ahead.
Should women ‘man up’ for male-dominated fields? Women applying for a job in male-dominated fields should consider playing up their masculine qualities, indicates new research by Michigan State University scholars that’s part of a series of studies on bias in the hiring process. In a laboratory experiment, women who described themselves using masculine-like traits (assertive, independent, achievement oriented) were evaluated as more [...]The post Should women ‘man up’ for male-dominated fields? appeared first on PsyPost.
Physical fitness can help prevent young adolescents’ depression, study finds Physically fit sixth-graders – especially girls – are less likely to report feeling depressed when they reach seventh grade, according to a study presented at the American Psychological Association’s 122nd Annual Convention. Even when researchers considered existing symptoms of depression and weight, sixth-grade girls who performed better on a cardiorespiratory fitness test were less likely [...]The post Physical fitness can help prevent young adolescents’ depression, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Human skin cells reprogrammed as neurons regrow in rats with spinal cord injuries While neurons normally fail to regenerate after spinal cord injuries, neurons formed from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that were grafted into rats with such injuries displayed remarkable growth throughout the length of the animals’ central nervous system. What’s more, the iPSCs were derived from skin cells taken from an 86-year-old man. The results, [...]The post Human skin cells reprogrammed as neurons regrow in rats with spinal cord injuries appeared first on PsyPost.
Researcher finds companies’ religious affiliation can buffer negative reactions While companies like Hobby Lobby and Chick-fil-A are at the forefront of debate over the religious rights of employers, a new study by a Grand Valley State University researcher shows religious affiliation can safeguard companies against negative reactions to store policies. The findings were published in the Journal of Services Marketing. The research, led by Kelly [...]The post Researcher finds companies’ religious affiliation can buffer negative reactions appeared first on PsyPost.