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Three Bedtime Reflection Routines that Will Help You Sleep   There’s a lot going on in the critical moments when you lie in your bed with your eyes closed. As you slowly fall asleep, your brain goes through the gradual process of disengaging from the external world, and quieting your normal train of thoughts. At first, the brain exhibits...
MRI shows gray matter myelin loss strongly related to MS disability People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Researchers said the findings could have important applications in clinical trials and treatment monitoring. The study appears online in the [...]The post MRI shows gray matter myelin loss strongly related to MS disability appeared first on PsyPost.
New study shows impact of movies on dog breed popularity The effect of movies featuring dogs on the popularity of dog breeds can last up to ten years and is correlated with the general success of the movies, according to new research from the University of Bristol, the City University of New York, and Western Carolina University. The study, published today in PLOS ONE, also found [...]The post New study shows impact of movies on dog breed popularity appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents’ separation found to boost children’s behavior problems, but only in high-income families Before they reach young adulthood, most children in the United States will experience their parents separating, divorcing, finding another partner, or getting remarried. Research tells us that children have more behavior problems (such as aggression and defiance) when families change structure. Now a new study has found that behavior problems in children increased in families [...]The post Parents’ separation found to boost children’s behavior problems, but only in high-income families appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows that in baboons, as well as humans, social relationships matter Elizabeth Archie, Clare Booth Luce Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Notre Dame and colleagues used an incredibly rich data set on the social relationships of wild baboons which was collected on an almost daily basis, year-round, since 1984 by the Amboseli Baboon Research Project. The project, which Archie helps direct, is a [...]The post Study shows that in baboons, as well as humans, social relationships matter appeared first on PsyPost.
New study examines impact of violent media on the brain With the longstanding debate over whether violent movies cause real world violence as a backstop, a study published today in PLOS One found that each person’s reaction to violent images depends on that individual’s brain circuitry, and on how aggressive they were to begin with. The study, which was led by researchers at the Icahn School of [...]The post New study examines impact of violent media on the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Working during depression can offer health benefits to employees Attending work while suffering a depressive illness could help employees better manage their depression more than taking a sickness absence from work, a new study has found. The collaborative study between the University Of Melbourne and the Menzies Research Institute at the University of Tasmania is the first to estimate the long-term costs and health [...]The post Working during depression can offer health benefits to employees appeared first on PsyPost.
Pain tolerance levels between men and women are similar Resilience, a person’s ability to overcome adverse circumstances, is the main quality associated with pain tolerance among patients and their adjustment to chronic pain. This is the result of a new study carried out at the University of Málaga that shows that the effect of gender on this ability is not as significant as originally [...]The post Pain tolerance levels between men and women are similar appeared first on PsyPost.
Penn research shows how brain can tell magnitude of errors University of Pennsylvania researchers have made another advance in understanding how the brain detects errors caused by unexpected sensory events. This type of error detection is what allows the brain to learn from its mistakes, which is critical for improving fine motor control. Their previous work explained how the brain can distinguish true error signals [...]The post Penn research shows how brain can tell magnitude of errors appeared first on PsyPost.
Networking can make some feel ‘dirty,’ new study finds If schmoozing for work leaves you with a certain “ick” factor, that’s not just awkwardness you’re feeling. Professional networking can create feelings of moral impurity and physical dirtiness, shows a new study. That can hold people back from networking more, reducing career opportunities and lowering job performance, says study co-author Tiziana Casciaro, an associate professor [...]The post Networking can make some feel ‘dirty,’ new study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Get the Courage to Live the Life You Want: “Only if you stand on my lab table in the front of the room and sing ‘Joy to the World’,” said Mr. Sneider, my science teacher. It was the first week of freshman year of high school. I’d forgotten my homework and asked if it could be turned in the...
More needed to protect our sportspeople from brain injury, say experts Academics are calling for more research to be carried out looking at how the brains of sportspeople -- including children -- react when they receive a blow to the head.
Are You Fighting Fair? 5 Ways NOT to Fight There’s a reason you aren’t getting along. Are you finding it difficult to communicate with an ex or with your partner? If so, then this article will shed some light on why you keep having challenging and aggressive conversations. Below are five critical mistakes I see my clients (and myself!)...
More evidence that sleep apnea is hurting your brain Employing a measure rarely used in sleep apnea studies, researchers have uncovered evidence of what may be damaging the brain in people with the sleep disorder -- weaker brain blood flow.
Myers-Briggs or VIA: A Comparison of Tools Most people these days seem to know their “type” according to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). You know whether you prefer to be more extraverted or introverted, thinking or feeling, or judging or perceiving. The MBTI has been one of the most popular tests in pop psychology for decades. People who have taken...
Mothers’ responses to babies’ crying: Benefiting from and getting over childhood experiences Research has told us that infants whose mothers respond quickly, consistently, and warmly when they cry have healthier emotional development than infants whose mothers are less sensitive to their cries. A new study has found that mothers whose childhood experiences with caregivers was positive and those who have come to terms with negative experiences are [...]The post Mothers’ responses to babies’ crying: Benefiting from and getting over childhood experiences appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens’ neural response to food commercials predicts future weight gain Children and adolescents see thousands of food commercials each year and most of them advertise junk foods high in sugar, fat and salt. Yet, we know almost nothing about how all of this food marketing impacts the brain, especially for teens. New research suggests that food commercials “get under the skin” of teens by activating [...]The post Teens’ neural response to food commercials predicts future weight gain appeared first on PsyPost.
Self-Care for Therapists Being a therapist is an amazing, rewarding, challenging job. As a therapist who also has a family and two other part-time jobs, it is extremely important for me to consider self-care. This is important for any therapist and really for everyone else to consider, as well. To live a healthy,...
Mental health debates without the stress If you work in mental health, you could do much worse than reading the editorial in today’s Lancet Psychiatry about unpleasant debates and how to avoid them. Unfortunately, debates in mental health tend to get nasty quite quickly – but I’ve seen no part of the debate spectrum which has a monopoly on bigotry or […]
Study: Sports broadcasting gender roles echoed on Twitter Twitter provides an avenue for female sports broadcasters to break down gender barriers, yet it currently serves to express their subordinate sports media roles. This is the key finding of a new study by Clemson University researchers and published in the most recent issue of Journal of Sports Media. “Social media has been embraced by the [...]The post Study: Sports broadcasting gender roles echoed on Twitter appeared first on PsyPost.