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The State of Singles in the U.S., for a In the Netherlands, a publication called Individual and Society is about to publish its 100th issue. They have a theme – the state of single people around the world. They have asked people in different countries to write brief overviews of single people in their country, which they will translate...
The Common Mental Habit that Creates Negative Cascade of Stuff goes wrong, right? There isn’t a fix for that. We live in an imperfect world. The question is, are you doing the one thing that has been scientifically proven to take things from bad to worse? The simple mental habit mentioned below has been shown to create the following...
Creativity Can Be a Fearful Flyer’s Best Friend I’m a recovered fearful flyer who experienced a setback this year, and I have to brush up on my anxiety prevention skills. Of course I knew this could happen. Apparently membership in the Fearful Flyers Club is for life. I try not to despair. But when it comes down to...
Healthy Self-Esteem versus Healthy Narcissism Response to a comment about yesterday's post, which tries to clear the air about where the "sub-clinical" version of narcissism I discussed fits into a conception of healthy self-esteem versus pathological narcissism.
Finding Hope from an Attempt Survivor on World Suicide (Video) An attempt survivor talks about his experience, recovery, and hope....
The Neuroscience of Resistance and How to Overcome It! We all experience resistance everyday when we’re trying to do something that matters. Whether you want to sit and meditate, work on a new project, get out and exercise, whatever it is that is in the direction of growth, resistance comes alive. In my next book Uncovering Happiness (can’t wait...
Impact of violent media on the brain: Depends on each individual's brain circuitry, study finds With the longstanding debate over whether violent movies cause real world violence as a backstop, a study has found that each person's reaction to violent images depends on that individual's brain circuitry, and on how aggressive they were to begin with.
The Mysterious Case of Primate Peacefulness Some primates show us how peace can win out over violence.
What if I had died when I tried to commit suicide? Image courtesy of 9comeback at FreeDigitalPhotos.net   My post is a little late this week because I wanted to write something for today – World Suicide Prevention Day. You see I have made that choice – whether to continue living or to die. I have held my life in the...
How brain can tell magnitude of errors Researchers have made another advance in understanding how the brain detects errors caused by unexpected sensory events. This type of error detection is what allows the brain to learn from its mistakes, which is critical for improving fine motor control.
The Einstellung Effect Proves That a Good Idea Can Be A Very Bad Idea The perfect is the enemy of the good. We know that phrase very well. What the Einstellung Effect proves is the good can be a real enemy of the even better. When we have a solution that's good, we can't begin to think about a better one....
Too: The ADHD Adverb Am I too late? I hope not. I don’t like being late. I especially don’t like being too late. It’s too troubling and causes too much anxiety. I get too late from being too easily distracted. Too often I forget to check the time. Then I try to make up...
World Suicide Prevention Day, 2014 Every day around the world, families and friends grieve the loss of a loved one due to suicide. Not once. Not twice. But over 2,000 times per day someone takes their own life. Can you imagine? If Ebola took 2,000 people’s lives per day, we’d hear a world outcry and...
Air pollution harmful to young brains, study finds Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings from a recent study reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease.
Gray matter myelin loss strongly related to multiple sclerosis disability, MRI shows People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging study. Researchers said the findings could have important applications in clinical trials and treatment monitoring.
Autism: New Therapy Found To Eliminate Symptoms and Developmental Delays Simple techniques taught to parents are the key to an effective new therapy for autism. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Autism Begins During Pregnancy Probiotic Therapy Shows Promise for Treating Autism Children With Autism Exposed to More Steroid Hormones in The Womb Autism Related to Lipid Levels During Pregnancy Brain Wiring Differences in Sensory Processing Disorders and Autism
The Ice Bucket Challenge: Remembering Loved Ones Affected by I am impressed with the viral nature of the “Ice Bucket Challenge,” but I’m wondering if people really understand its purpose above and beyond the fun of calling out their friends (and enemies). This challenge is intended to raise money for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease —...
Shared pain brings people together: study What doesn’t kill us may make us stronger as a group, according to findings from new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research suggests that, despite its unpleasantness, pain may actually have positive social consequences, acting as a sort of “social glue” that fosters cohesion and solidarity within groups: “Our findings show that [...]The post Shared pain brings people together: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Religious youths are less likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol Young people who regularly attend religious services and describe themselves as religious are less likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol, according to a new study. The study of 195 juvenile offenders was done by researchers at Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion, the University of Akron and Case Western Reserve University School of [...]The post Religious youths are less likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol appeared first on PsyPost.
How age alters our immune response to bereavement Young people have a more robust immune response to the loss of a loved one, according to new research from the University of Birmingham, providing insight into how different generations cope with loss. The study, published in the journal Immunity and Ageing, shows how the balance of our stress hormones during grief changes as we age [...]The post How age alters our immune response to bereavement appeared first on PsyPost.