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Sometimes a Little Help from Our Friends Hurts It has been well-documented that perceived support is associated with greater health and well-being, but the effects of actually getting help from others are mixed. Sometimes, it makes us feel good, but other times it doesn't help, and can even make us feel worse. New research shows how help from our loved ones can threaten our self-worth.
Only Connect: How Colleges Could Work Better A new book offers helpful suggestions for improving the curricular and co-curricular experience of college students.
Brain differences: Sometimes, adolescents just can't resist A new study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.
Owls provides clues on how humans focus attention Research with barn owls reveals how the brain decides what it should pay attention to among competing external events.
Neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia discovered Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers have discovered that neurons from patients with schizophrenia secrete higher amounts of three neurotransmitters broadly implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders.
Psychology Lessons from the Ray Rice Fiasco Over the past few days, the sports media has been focused almost exclusively on the story of Ray Rice. Ray Rice was a superstar running back for the Baltimore Ravens who, before the summer, was caught on a security camera dragging his fiancé (now wife) out of an elevator, believed...
Suicide Prevention: The Most Powerful Words You Should Never On the evening of September 10th, I walked for suicide prevention as the sunset at Gilchrist park, Punta Gorda. I was given the above-piece of paper to pin on my shirt and to write “WHO” I was walking for? “I AM WALKING FOR”…many walked for loved ones that had lost...
A Message For All Private Practice Owners Have you ever shopped for a therapist before? It builds a lot of empathy for our clients. Just get on any directory and look for an issues such as anxiety or depression and read through the profiles of the therapists listed. How do you choose? After awhile your eyes might...
7 Picture Books That Can Help Adults & Teens For some adults and adolescents, picture books can offer a non-threatening way to explore their feelings and emotions....
3 Tips for Sparking Your Kids’ Creativity “Creativity is a gift, given in some measure to all of us,” said Tom Sturges, an accomplished music executive, author, teacher and speaker. For over 15 years, Sturges has mentored and taught thousands of students to explore their creativity, “to let their creative instinct ‘emerge’ rather than to force it...
Childhood Emotional Neglect: Real People, Real Stories Today I wish to share some of the most powerful words there are: the words of real people sharing their stories. Some were emailed to me (with permission to share), and some were posted as comments on my website. Here is a sampling of the real words of people who...
Is the pattern of brain folding a 'fingerprint' for schizophrenia? Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human brain is aware that the outside layer, or cortex, of the brain is folded in an intricate pattern of “hills”, called gyri, and “valleys”, called sulci. It turns out that the patterns of cortical folding are largely consistent across healthy humans, broadly speaking. However, disturbances in cortical folding patterns suggest deeper disturbances in brain structure and function..
Happiness: 10 Fascinating New Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know Where we feel happiness in the body, how it affects our genetic code, why it changes with age, unexpected pleasures and much more... Here are 10 of my favourite recent psychology studies about happiness. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:4 Dark Sides To The Pursuit of Happiness The Body Map of Emotions: Happiness Activates the Whole Body How to Set Goals That Lead to Happiness The Key to Happiness: Brainpower or Social Connectedness? The Happiness Equation: It Can Predict How Good You Will Feel Moment-by-Moment
What Joan Rivers Taught Us about Grief I was never a huge fan of Joan Rivers’ comedy routines — a little too coarse for my taste — but I always had a warm spot in my heart for the woman born Joan Alexandra Molinsky. She had the same glass-etching, Brooklyn accent as most of my mother’s family,...
Three Bedtime Reflection Routines that Will Help You Sleep   There’s a lot going on in the critical moments when you lie in your bed with your eyes closed. As you slowly fall asleep, your brain goes through the gradual process of disengaging from the external world, and quieting your normal train of thoughts. At first, the brain exhibits...
MRI shows gray matter myelin loss strongly related to MS disability People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Researchers said the findings could have important applications in clinical trials and treatment monitoring. The study appears online in the [...]The post MRI shows gray matter myelin loss strongly related to MS disability appeared first on PsyPost.
New study shows impact of movies on dog breed popularity The effect of movies featuring dogs on the popularity of dog breeds can last up to ten years and is correlated with the general success of the movies, according to new research from the University of Bristol, the City University of New York, and Western Carolina University. The study, published today in PLOS ONE, also found [...]The post New study shows impact of movies on dog breed popularity appeared first on PsyPost.
Parents’ separation found to boost children’s behavior problems, but only in high-income families Before they reach young adulthood, most children in the United States will experience their parents separating, divorcing, finding another partner, or getting remarried. Research tells us that children have more behavior problems (such as aggression and defiance) when families change structure. Now a new study has found that behavior problems in children increased in families [...]The post Parents’ separation found to boost children’s behavior problems, but only in high-income families appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows that in baboons, as well as humans, social relationships matter Elizabeth Archie, Clare Booth Luce Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Notre Dame and colleagues used an incredibly rich data set on the social relationships of wild baboons which was collected on an almost daily basis, year-round, since 1984 by the Amboseli Baboon Research Project. The project, which Archie helps direct, is a [...]The post Study shows that in baboons, as well as humans, social relationships matter appeared first on PsyPost.
New study examines impact of violent media on the brain With the longstanding debate over whether violent movies cause real world violence as a backstop, a study published today in PLOS One found that each person’s reaction to violent images depends on that individual’s brain circuitry, and on how aggressive they were to begin with. The study, which was led by researchers at the Icahn School of [...]The post New study examines impact of violent media on the brain appeared first on PsyPost.