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Strategizing to Break Old Habits and Pick Up Better I’m writing my next book, Better Than Before, about how we make and break habits – an issue very relevant to happiness. Each week, I post a before-and-after story submitted by a reader, about how he or she successfully changed a habit. This way we can all learn from each other. If you’d...
This Blood Type Linked to Memory Loss Later in Life Study of over 30,000 people finds link between this blood type and pre-dementia symptoms. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:High Blood Sugar Levels Linked to Brain Decay Blood Test for Alzheimer’s Breakthrough The Facial Expression That Fights Memory Loss 10 Ways to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease The Effects of Vitamin E on Alzheimer’s and Age-Related Memory Problems
What Online Quizzes Tell Us About Ourselves The other day a Facebook friend posted a link to a free online quiz. The title read, “What is your brain gender?” Of course I had to take it (I mean, who knew my brain had a gender?!) The quiz asked me a series of seemingly easy questions. I felt...
ADHD; It’s All About The Shortcuts So you want to know how to keep from being distracted, eh? Well, there’s only one sure way. Avoid distractions. Sorry, that sounds pretty simplistic, doesn’t it? And yet, it’s the truth. I’m a non-practising alcoholic. I’ve been sober for over 30 years now. And the simple truth of my...
Why Couldn’t I Have Fun by Myself? I have a confession to make: I might have seriously flaked out last weekend. Actually, I DID seriously flake out last weekend. You see, last summer I participated in The Color Run (pictured above). It was A BLAST. I got together a big group of friends and formed a team...
Nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species While more than half of US smokers try to quit every year, less than 10 percent are able to remain smoke-free, and relapse commonly occurs within 48 hours of smoking cessation. In a first of its kind study on nicotine addiction, scientists measured a behavior that can be similarly quantified across species like humans and rats, the responses to rewards during nicotine withdrawal. Learning about withdrawal and difficulty of quitting can lead to more effective treatments to help smokers quit.
Should Governments Target Happiness? Happiness is a wonderful thing and is what most of us strive for in our personal lives. But is it the proper basis for government policy? There are many reasons to be skeptical...
When You First Meet Someone, Do You Reveal Yourself Last week’s cartoon is about finding or believing in that one thing that will turn your life around. All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2014.  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to get notified of new cartoons...
Best of Our Blogs: September 12, 2014 You might have felt it-a slight stir in the weather, the change in decor at stores, the waft of pumpkin, cinnamon and nutmeg at the coffee shop. We’re on the verge of a season change. But before you get swallowed up by all of the holidays that come with it,...
High levels of physical activity linked to better academic performance in boys A recent Finnish study shows that higher levels of physical activity are related to better academic achievement during the first three school years particularly in boys. The study published in PLOS ONE was conducted in collaboration with the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland and the First Steps [...]The post High levels of physical activity linked to better academic performance in boys appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists discover neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California, San Diego have discovered that neurons from patients with schizophrenia secrete higher amounts of three neurotransmitters broadly implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders. The findings, reported online Sept. 11 in Stem Cell Reports, represent an [...]The post Scientists discover neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia appeared first on PsyPost.
Chemical signals in the brain help guide risky decisions A gambler’s decision to stay or fold in a game of cards could be influenced by a chemical in the brain, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. The rise and fall of dopamine plays a key role in decisions involving risk and reward, from a baseball player trying to steal a base [...]The post Chemical signals in the brain help guide risky decisions appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists show that nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide and is associated with approximately 440,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population continues to smoke cigarettes. While more than half of U.S. smokers try to quit [...]The post Scientists show that nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species appeared first on PsyPost.
Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mice that were treated with these compounds 24-36 hours after experiencing TBI from a blast injury were protected from the harmful effects of TBI, including problems with learning, memory, and [...]The post Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
You can classify words in your sleep When people practice simple word classification tasks before nodding off—knowing that a “cat” is an animal or that “flipu” isn’t found in the dictionary, for example—their brains will unconsciously continue to make those classifications even in sleep. The findings, reported in the Cell Press journalCurrent Biology on September 11, show that some parts of the brain [...]The post You can classify words in your sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Joan Rivers’ “Can We Talk?” Therapy Much has been written about standup comic Joan Rivers after her recent tragic death.  However, not many people know about the tragedies she dealt with in life.  For example, after she was fired from her own late night talk show, and the subsequent suicide of her husband, Edgar Rosenberg, she...
4 Ways to Make Your Website Mobile-Friendly More and more people are using their phones to search the internet.  By optimizing your online content for mobile devices, your clients can more efficiently access the information and services your therapy practice provides.   It has been said that 2014 is the year of the mobile.  People are increasingly...
Do You Have a Spirit Animal? Recently, I was inspired to pen an article that explored the topic: What is my spirit animal? The desire to write this piece came to me after speaking with a friend of mine, Ben, who is a member of the Oneida Tribe of Indians. According to Ben, several Native Indian...
9 11: Remember World Trade Center’s Twin Towers: 9 11 Tribute with Twin Towers Memorial. I felt compelled to draw the above tribute today.  I kept seeing images of the World Trade Center in my mind but it was transparent – fading ~ yet it was an ever-present, unabating image.  If you read...
How You Can Find Gratitude When You’re Overwhelmed with It’s pretty easy to feel grateful when good things happen. Win the lottery or fall in love? Easy. But what if you lose your spouse, or child, or even your job, how do we find gratitude then? Scientifically, we know gratitude is strongly linked to well being. People just feel...