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What Are Your Key Skills and Abilities? A self-assessment to help you find career success.
Spike activity 15-08-2014 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: An important editorial in Nature describes the pressing problem of how research is not being turned into practice for treating children with mental health problems caused by armed conflict. Not Exactly Rocket Science covers a swarm of self-organising autonomous robots that have the potential […]
Mindfulness for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) has got to be one of the most miserable disorders a person can have. I should know because I have it. If you have IBS, you know exactly what I am talking about. The constant tummy churning, the non-stop gas and unsightly bloating is enough to...
Top 10 Underpublicized Reasons to Seek Couples Counseling Do you notice everyone around you is in couples counseling? I do, because I’m a couples therapist. But even among people I meet casually, it seems everyone is going. The stigma of seeing a couples therapist will probably reverse soon. So, why be left out of this trend? All around...
Depression often untreated in Parkinson's disease Depression is known to be a common symptom of Parkinson's disease, but remains untreated for many patients, according to a new study. In fact, depression is the most prevalent non-motor symptom of Parkinson's, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder typically associated with movement dysfunction. Among those with high levels of depressive symptoms, only one-third had been prescribed antidepressants before the study began, and even fewer saw social workers or mental health professionals for counseling.
New non-invasive technique controls the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier A new technique developed by Elisa Konofagou, professor of biomedical engineering and radiology atColumbia Engineering, has demonstrated for the first time that the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be controlled using acoustic pressure—the pressure of an ultrasound beam—to let specific molecules through. The study was published in the July issue of the Journal of Cerebral [...]The post New non-invasive technique controls the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier appeared first on PsyPost.
Understanding parallels of human and animal parenting can benefit generations to come Strong evidence now shows that human and animal parenting share many nervous system mechanisms. This is the conclusion of Yerkes National Primate Research Center researchers Larry Young, PhD, and James Rilling, PhD, in their review article about the biology of mammalian parenting, published in this week’s issue of Science. Better understanding this biology could lead to [...]The post Understanding parallels of human and animal parenting can benefit generations to come appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Brain imaging shows brain differences in risk-taking teens According to the CDC, unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for adolescents. Compared to the two leading causes of death for all Americans, heart disease and cancer, a pattern of questionable decision-making in dire situations comes to light in teen mortality. New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas [...]The post Study: Brain imaging shows brain differences in risk-taking teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Dopamine replacement associated with impulse control increase in early Parkinson’s New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. The study also found that initiation of dopamine replacement therapy, the most common treatment for PD, was associated with increasing frequency of impulse control disorders and [...]The post Dopamine replacement associated with impulse control increase in early Parkinson’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Bigger government makes for more satisfied people, international study finds People living in countries with governments that spend more on social services report being more contented, according to a Baylor University study. “The effect of state intervention into the economy equals or exceeds marriage or employment status — two traditional predictors of happiness — when it comes to satisfaction,” said Patrick Flavin, Ph.D., assistant professor [...]The post Bigger government makes for more satisfied people, international study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too Amid a neuroscience debate about how people and animals focus on distinct objects within cluttered scenes, some of the newest and best evidence comes from the way bats “see” with their ears, according to a new paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology. In fact, the perception process in question could improve sonar and radar technology. [...]The post Bats bolster brain hypothesis, maybe technology, too appeared first on PsyPost.
Visual exposure predicts infants’ ability to follow another’s gaze Following another person’s gaze can reveal a wealth of information critical to social interactions and also to safety. Gaze following typically emerges in infancy, and new research looking at preterm infants suggests that it’s visual experience, not maturational age, that underlies this critical ability. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “To the [...]The post Visual exposure predicts infants’ ability to follow another’s gaze appeared first on PsyPost.
Study links depression to Parkinson’s disease Depression is known to be a common symptom of Parkinson’s disease, but remains untreated for many patients, according to a new study by Northwestern Medicine investigators in collaboration with the National Parkinson’s Foundation (NPF). In fact, depression is the most prevalent non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder typically associated with movement dysfunction. “We [...]The post Study links depression to Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Cleaning up Internet bullying The death of actor Robin Williams brought the subject of Internet bullying to the forefront.
Maternal singing calms preemies and lowers anxiety Study shows the combination of a mother's voice softly singing while holding a preemie calms both the baby and the mother.
An unintended consequence of border crisis School districts are bracing for the thousands of unaccompanied minors who are expected to join classrooms this upcoming fall.
An unproductive story of reproductive success and PMS By Cordelia Fine, University of Melbourne It’s been a mixed week for women and their hormones. When Maryam Mirzakhani became the first woman to win the prestigious Fields Medal for mathematics, a Cambridge mathematician suggested it would “put to bed many myths about women and mathematics”, one of which is the idea that females are [...]The post An unproductive story of reproductive success and PMS appeared first on PsyPost.
Speed it up or slow it down? The boundaries of reading apps for children By Natalia Kucirkova, The Open University A series of binary discussions has been plaguing early reading instruction for quite some time now: phonics versus whole language, reading for pleasure versus reading for learning, digital versus paper books. And it seems that there is a new tug-of-war on the educational horizon: spritzing versus slow reading. Spritz [...]The post Speed it up or slow it down? The boundaries of reading apps for children appeared first on PsyPost.
Nature and Nurture and BPD Genes and environment affect each other, and these changes affect how we react to our world.
To know suicide The most important risk factor for suicide may be mental illness, especially depression or bipolar disorder.