Article Description
Risky situations increase women’s anxiety, hurt their performance compared to men Risky situations increase anxiety for women but not for men, leading women to perform worse under these circumstances, finds a study to be presented at the 109th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association. “On the surface, risky situations may not appear to be particularly disadvantageous to women, but these findings suggest otherwise,” said study [...]The post Risky situations increase women’s anxiety, hurt their performance compared to men appeared first on PsyPost.
Stuck in neutral: Brain defect traps schizophrenics in twilight zone People with schizophrenia struggle to turn goals into actions because brain structures governing desire and emotion are less active and fail to pass goal-directed messages to cortical regions affecting human decision-making, new research reveals. Published in Biological Psychiatry, the finding by a University of Sydney research team is the first to illustrate the inability to initiate [...]The post Stuck in neutral: Brain defect traps schizophrenics in twilight zone appeared first on PsyPost.
Stem cells reveal how illness-linked genetic variation affects neurons A genetic variation linked to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression wreaks havoc on connections among neurons in the developing brain, a team of researchers reports. The study, led by Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D., and Hongjun Song, Ph.D., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and described online Aug. 17 in the journal Nature, used [...]The post Stem cells reveal how illness-linked genetic variation affects neurons appeared first on PsyPost.
New Stanford research sheds light on how children’s brains memorize facts As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. Now, new brain-imaging research gives the first evidence drawn from a longitudinal study to explain how the brain [...]The post New Stanford research sheds light on how children’s brains memorize facts appeared first on PsyPost.
Synapse dysfunction and psychiatric disorders: Suspect gene corrupts neural connections Researchers have long suspected that major mental disorders are genetically-rooted diseases of synapses – the connections between neurons. Now, investigators supported in part by the National Institutes of Health have demonstrated in patients’ cells how a rare mutation in a suspect gene disrupts the turning on and off of dozens of other genes underlying these [...]The post Synapse dysfunction and psychiatric disorders: Suspect gene corrupts neural connections appeared first on PsyPost.
Ferguson and the Flight Response The flight response can actually show up in a number of interesting ways. The first one is the most obvious, which is the classic flight of “fight/flight/freeze.” It’s the desire to escape from a dangerous situation. A recent example is Dorian Johnson’s description of running away with his friend Michael...
On Shooting the Marginalized and Marginalizing the Shot Let’s bring a less idealized vision of America and the police to the discussion of race. A fearful American is a failure of policing.
Transformative Change: Five Steps to Empower Your Mind to                So what is transformative change about? One way to think of transforming change is as an inner capacity you have to create the more happiness and meaning in life that you’re naturally included to do. More specifically, it is a way of consciously...
Surveys Can Make People Go Extreme There are all kinds of reasons why people don't tell the truth when asked questions. Sometimes they suddenly turn into fanatics. They hate, or love, anything. Here's how you catch people when they go extreme, or when they try to just get along....
Why Some People Only Need Five Hours’ Sleep a Night Study of twins explains how some people can function normally on 5 hours sleep. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Poor Sleep: 8 Hours With Interruptions As Bad As Only 4 Hours Sleep Deprivation: The 10 Most Profound Psychological Effects Poor Sleep Can Lead to False Memories Bad Night’s Sleep? Blame the Full Moon When You Sleep and Wake Up is Controlled by a Single Gene
Awakening to Ourselves As We Are: The Essence of The renowned psychologist Carl Rogers famously said, “The curious paradox is that when I can accept myself just as I am, then I can change.” This statement is as simple as it is profound — and yet not easy to implement. Yet it embodies a principle that is a key...
Overcoming Shame to Connect with Your True Self Each of us experiences shame. “ I t is part of our human condition,” writes author and therapist Darlene Lancer, LMFT, in Conquering Shame and Codependency: 8 Steps to Freeing the True You. Without good coping skills, we may feel like failures when we don’t meet our own or others’...
Brain scanning the deceased I’ve got an article in The Observer about how, a little surprisingly, the dead are becoming an increasing focus for brain scanning studies. I first discussed this curious corner of neuroscience back in 2007 but a recent Neuroskeptic post reminded me of the area and I decided to check in on how it’s progressing. It […]
Daniel Tammet: An Autistic (and Synesthetic) Savant The mind of Daniel Tammet, while exceptional in many ways, also reflects the experience of many types of highly sensitive people.
A Great Way to Reduce Your Job Satisfaction! This summer, I discovered a wonderful way to reduce the enjoyment you take from your job: Try to do as little as possible. And there’s research and theory to help us understand why!
Formula of Change A break-through begins with a pattern break. That’s it: pattern interruption restores operational freedom. Break out of the prison of pattern, Luddite of Consciousness. - related: Choice Awareness Training: Mindfulness and Logotherapy in Treatment of Addiction (Somov, P)    ...
Ways to Combat Insomnia If you find yourself tossing and turning for hours, unable to go to sleep or stay asleep, you could be suffering from insomnia. Nearly 40 percent of Americans report some symptoms of insomnia in a given year. It can take a toll on one’s emotional, psychological, and physical well-being. Chronic...
Paul Walker: Foretelling Photo Emerges Before Birthday I’m a huge fan of Paul Walker and was pretty upset when news broke last November that he died. I had followed his career almost from the very beginning and have read or reviewed every interview he has ever given. In advance of what would have been his 41st birthday this September 12,...
Et tu, Gene Simmons? Oy vey! Admission: I kind of like KISS music. I kind of like Gene Simmons. Some aspects of him, anyway. I never joined the KISS Army like my husband did in the 70′s – wait, I wasn’t alive in the 70′s – but after 15 years of being married to a man...
The Back-to-School Fresh Start Dear Friends, Back-to-school time is the perfect time to start fresh routines and establish healthy habits. These are the ones parents and I have been talking about the most: First of All, Plan for Adequate Sleep: Most kids don’t get enough sleep. Students learn better, feel better and behave better...