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Hopeful Lessons from Robin Williams and Kurt Cobain I’m old enough to remember Kurt Cobain’s suicide in 1994, and what a major cultural and news event it was. Although there have been other celebrity deaths in the years since, it’s only now with Robin William that a suicide has had as much attention and social magnitude. The differences...
The Perfect Storm in Borderline Personality Disorder According to a new and very exciting theory of borderline personality disorder, three factors collide to produce the perfect storm that is one of psychology's least understood conditions. People with this disorder as well as their loved ones and therapists, can benefit from the five ways to provide safe and effective interventions.
Myth: All You Need is Love The Beatles were on the money with almost all of their songs, but on this one, I’m afraid that they got it wrong. Unfortunately millions of Beatle fans that took their word as the holy truth found themselves deeply disappointed when they found out that love was not, in fact...
Opioid users breathe easier with novel drug to treat respiratory depression People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. A study has found that a new therapeutic drug, GAL-021, may reverse or prevent respiratory depression, or inadequate breathing, in patients taking opioid medication without compromising pain relief or increasing sedation.
The Autism Spectrum and Dr. Wing “‘Between the two poles was a large population of people struggling with undiagnosed forms of the disorder at the core of autism." Dr. Wing describes that disorder as "a lack of ability to understand and use the rules governing social behavior."
The Different Ways We Can Be Kinder to Ourselves In Heart to Heart, my eBook with Anna Guest-Jelley, we focus on cultivating kindness, because we don’t heal ourselves with insults, judgement and body bashing. We heal ourselves — our bruised body image, our sinking self-worth — with compassion. I like Sharon Salzberg’s definition of kindness in her book The...
Introducing the Blog, Play Therapy I’m very pleased to introduce Dr. Kristi Pikiewicz’s blog, Play Therapy. Here’s her wonderful and informative introduction to what she’ll be talking about on here: Play therapy is more than babysitting amid colorful clutter. It is a rich therapy tradition with a long history of research and use, requiring a...
Teaching Ferguson Talking to our students about the August events in Ferguson.
How to Market a Losing Team As the World Cup demonstrated with winning and losing, fans enjoy rooting for winning teams. Beyond mere rooting interests, the preference for winning has strong marketing implications as well. Three sports marketing professors, Dalakas, Madrigal, and Anderson (2004), noted that the easiest way to market a team and increase ticket...
The Surprising Impact of Weight Loss on the Emotions How losing weight affects happiness (it's not what you think!). Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Why Dieting Does Not Usually Work How to Lose Weight: Stop Exercising, Start Having Fun The Facial Expression That Fights Memory Loss Food on the Mind: 20 Surprising Insights From Food Psychology The Surprising Motivational Power of Self-Compassion
An Apriori of Forgiveness: You Can Blame a Human Most of the time we move forward/onward without any philosophy of living, without any ideology, mindlessly! In mindlessness we are all equal – from saint to sinner (not that I believe in these distinctions). But when something aversive (bad) happens to us or those that we relate to (i.e. identify...
Fish study links brain size to parental duties Male stickleback fish that protect their young have bigger brains than counterparts that don't care for offspring, finds a new study. "This suggests that regular sticklebacks have bigger brains to handle the brain power needed to care for and protect their young," says the study's lead author. "This is one of the first studies to link parental care with brain size."
Physically fit kids have beefier brain white matter than their less-fit peers A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. 'White matter' describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity.
5 Tips for More Effective Parenting These are equal opportunity parenting tips.  They apply no matter the age of your kids (be they toddlers, teenagers, somewhere in between, or even adult children.)  Once you’re a parent, you can’t really quit or retire, so might as well keep doing it better. 1)  Aim to listen as much...
Best of Our Blogs: August 19, 2014 For the past few years I’ve been battling an autoimmune disease. On bad days, it wreaks havoc on my physical and emotional health. The hardest part of dealing with the illness, however, is not fighting it, but myself. When things are going well, it’s almost a non-issue. As a result,...
How To Improve Relationship Closeness–”Stop Talking” While almost everyone working with couples and every self-help book underscores communication as central to any good relationship, there are times when the last thing that brings a couple together is “ talking.” If you have ever said or heard someone say “ We Need to Talk,” you know that...
A Mother and Her Son’s Struggle With Schizophrenia Are you the parent of a child, adolescent, or adult child with severe mental illness? How do you feel right now? Tired? Lonely? Discouraged? Or even stronger? Some parents say that they are struggling every single day of their lives with the reality that their child, teen, or adult child...
Dress for success: Research examines male influences on ‘looking’ middle class They might be called a chip off the old block, but when it comes to upward social mobility, they might call Dad a lesson in what not to wear. University of Cincinnati research takes a new approach to examining the socialization of male children into the middle class. The research by Erynn Masi de Casanova, [...]The post Dress for success: Research examines male influences on ‘looking’ middle class appeared first on PsyPost.
Ten-hut: New discoveries on how military organization affects civilians Researchers are reporting new discoveries about how militarization affects the general, civilian population, and the biggest positive impact is adequate sanitation and access to education. The research led by Steve Carlton-Ford, professor and head of the University of Cincinnati Sociology Department, was presented at the 109th meeting of the American Sociological Association in San Francisco. Pooling data [...]The post Ten-hut: New discoveries on how military organization affects civilians appeared first on PsyPost.
A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding a DNA base here or removing a DNA base there could have much of an effect on our health. In fact, such insertions and deletions can dramatically alter biological function, leading to diseases from autism to cancer. Still, it is [...]The post A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape appeared first on PsyPost.