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EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Understanding how threat is processed in a normal brain versus one altered by PTSD is essential [...]The post EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
How the media covers suicide: Day 1 Covering Suicide and Mental Illness is a three-day seminar for journalists sponsored by The Poynter Institute, The McCormick Specialized Reporting Institute and the Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Here are my thoughts on issues covered during today’s session. #suicidereporting What the DSM is to mental health, the AP Stylebook is...
Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties Researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges.
#116 Abundant Living Nominees I asked friends and family to nominate people they know or have known who live abundantly. I invited them to use my definition which I posted in blog #115 or they could use their own definition. As the nominations are coming in I am discovering that most people are choosing...
Know What Makes You Happy? 3 Tips to Help You already know what to do to increase your happiness. Now get unstuck and do it! You know a zillion things you could do to feel better, to increase your happiness and to get more of what you want, and yet you don’t do them. You want to lose weight...
Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech. Researchers from MIT and several European universities have shown that the human version of a gene called Foxp2 makes it easier to transform new experiences into routine [...]The post Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene appeared first on PsyPost.
Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of connections A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, [...]The post Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of connections appeared first on PsyPost.
Network measures predict neuropsychological outcome after brain injury Cognitive neuroscience research has shown that certain brain regions are associated with specific cognitive abilities, such as language, naming, and decision-making. How and where these specific abilities are integrated in the brain to support complex cognition is still under investigation. However, researchers at the University of Iowa and Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, believe [...]The post Network measures predict neuropsychological outcome after brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is reported online Sept. 15 [...]The post Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders appeared first on PsyPost.
Breaking down experiences into millions of parts may help explain consciousness By W. Alex Escobar, Emory University Take the screen on which you are reading this article. When you look at it, you see one complete scene, but you know that this scene is composed of millions of pixels that only come in three colours: red, blue and green. When you look out at the world, [...]The post Breaking down experiences into millions of parts may help explain consciousness appeared first on PsyPost.
Yoga helps war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder By Flora Lisica, The Conversation It’s no secret that yoga can aid mental well-being. What is more, it can help soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, according to new research. Some of the most damaging consequences of seeing combat can happen in the mind. Of the 2.3m American veterans who returned from wars in Iraq [...]The post Yoga helps war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Scars or tattoos? Today it seems like everyone has at least one tattoo. Over half my brother’s body is inked. My sister hides one on her rib cage. They can be anywhere, backs, calves, arms, bikini lines. No place is off limits. I have two tattoos. The first is the word “Love” on...
The One Best Reason to Fall in Love Partnership is the best way to learn a lesson we all need: how to avoid over-reacting to a perceived threat. It's a lesson in threat management, and negotiating a mutual sense of safety and freedom.
Free Webinar: ADHD Coaching – Everything You’ve Always Wanted Adults with ADHD often feel misunderstood; a feeling based on legitimate experiences throughout their lives. As an adult with ADHD wouldn’t it be great to find someone who can listen to you with genuine understanding? Someone who acknowledges the reality of your personal experiences? Someone who truly gets you? Look...
Combining Epilepsy Drug, Morphine Can Result in Less Pain, Lower Opioid Doses Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control, fewer side effects and reduced morphine dosage, according to research. The result could bring significant relief to many patients with neuropathic pain, a difficult-to-treat condition often felt in the arms and legs and associated with nerve tissue damage.
Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD brain study finds slower development of key connections A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.
How Sensitivity Can Enhance Creativity “For me, fashion is incredibly emotional. I go to shows in Paris and try not to cry.” Actor Jessica Chastain Qualities such as emotionality and empathy can help highly sensitive people be especially creative. The self-test Are You Highly Sensitive? by Elaine N. Aron, PhD includes the items: “I have a rich,...
The Ultimate Compatibility Test Based on 4 Classical Personality Types Once you answer all questions (you: left column, your partner: right column) a table with results will appear. It will tell you how much you scored for every personality type. Your main personality type is where you scored the highest. Similarly, your partner’s personality type is where he or she scored the highest. Once you […]
Schizophrenia Is Actually Eight Distinct Genetic Disorders New research published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that schizophrenia is not a single disease, but rather a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each of them with its own set of symptoms. The finding could result in improved diagnosis and treatment, while also shedding light on how genes work together to cause complex disorders....
Radical Embitterment: The Psychology of Terrorists Given recent events, I was reminded of my previous postings here several years ago, in which I discussed the psychology of terrorists and their motivations, both conscious and unconscious. It seems timely to revisit these posts (Parts 1 and 2) today, with an eye toward how they might apply to the phenomenon of ISIS, an even more virulent and violent strain of Al-Qaeda.