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The dangers of workaholism for you and your employer By Mark Griffiths, Nottingham Trent University The term “workaholism” has been around since the 1971 publication of Wayne Oates’ book Confessions of a Workaholic. But, despite increasing research into the idea, there is still no single concept of this phenomenon. This is problematic for tackling the issue which, if classified as an addiction, should be [...]The post The dangers of workaholism for you and your employer appeared first on PsyPost.
What is good comedy? The answer probably depends on your social background By Sam Friedman, City University London Among the 1,000 or so comedians who have been jostling for attention at this year’s Edinburgh festival fringe, two grabbed a disproportionate amount of headlines. Both occupy prime slots in big venues and both are receiving regular standing ovations. At one end of Edinburgh’s salubrious Old Town, in the [...]The post What is good comedy? The answer probably depends on your social background appeared first on PsyPost.
4 Poisonous Communication Patterns and the Antidotes Communication isn't always good for a couple. Sometimes it can poison love...but there are antidotes.
Pets and PTSD “My dogs save my life every day. They keep me sane, grounded. When I see how much they love me, I feel worth something. Plus, they rely on me to take care of them, so they give me a reason to get healthy.” –trauma survivor Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) is...
The Truth about Gay Conversion Therapy Therapists are Trained, Governors are Not A few weeks ago Texas Governor Rick Perry, speaking in San Francisco, defended his state’s Republican Party Platform endorsing gay conversion therapy (also called reparative therapy), essentially stating that homosexuality is a choice. So once again this topic is in the news and in...
Robin Williams: Intensity Is Not Pathology – Part 2 Continued from Part 1 As Dr. Webb explains “Existential depression is a depression that arises when an individual confronts certain basic issues of existence… (or ‘ultimate concerns’) – death, freedom, isolation and meaninglessness.” Gifted, Sensitive, In Need Of Meaning: Existential Depression. His related book: Searching for Meaning:...
What Do Animals Really Dream About? If animals dream like us, where do they go in their slumber? Some scientists have discovered that we can peer into the minds of sleeping cats, birds and other creatures to find out....
Raised By A Narcissist Few phrases sum up the idea of narcissism better than: It’s all about me.  But the most defining feature of a person with narcissism is actually not his self-involvement. It’s his deeply concealed fear of being exposed as inadequate. Underneath the bluster and arrogance of the narcissist lies a hurt...
Fed up with waiting? Timely activation of serotonin enhances patience Lining up in a long queue or waiting for the arrival of someone requires a great deal of patience. Our lives are full of decisions involving patience, yet it needs to be exercised at the appropriate times. In order to examine the brain mechanism for controlling patience to obtain a reward, researchers used a new technique called optogenetics, where they use light to simulate specific neurons with precise timing. Their most recent research shows that activating serotonin neurons specifically during waiting promotes patience for delayed rewards.
Teens who skimp on sleep may face later obesity risk Sleep deprivation has been shown in past research to affect the health of teens in a number of ways.
Attention is drawn to the prevalence of suicide among vets Combat-related guilt is the most significant predictor of suicide attempts and of preoccupation with suicide after discharge from the military.
Your Inner Critic: Friend or Foe? Whether we realize it or not, we each have an inner critic that speaks to us. An invisible auditor who resides in our mind and is constantly inspecting and judging our actions. A “necessary evil” that as annoying as it is, makes sure we stay on track. But that if...
Mouse model for epilepsy, Alzheimer's gives window into working brain A genetically engineered line of mice has been developed that is expected to open the door to new research on epilepsy, Alzheimer's and other diseases. The mice carry a protein marker, which changes in degree of fluorescence in response to different calcium levels. This will allow many cell types, including cells called astrocytes and microglia, to be studied in a new way.
Children with autism have extra synapses in brain: May be possible to prune synapses with drug after diagnosis Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain “pruning” process during development, according to a new study. Because synapses are the points where neurons connect and communicate with each other, the excessive synapses may have profound effects on how the brain functions.
Influenced by self-interest, humans less concerned about inequity to others, researchers find Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers have found. This could imply that humans are less concerned than previously believed about the inequity of others, researchers said. These findings suggest humans’ sense of unfairness is affected by their self-interest, indicating the interest humans show in others’ outcomes is a recently evolved propensity.
Does Living in the Moment Mean Forgetting the Past? Let it go. Move on. Live in the moment. These are valid sentiments — words of wisdom that are featured in self-help books and spoken by personal development gurus. And I honestly adhere to those notions; moving forward from certain chapters and releasing old ghosts is freeing. And healthy. Staying...
Learning to play the piano? Sleep on it! According to new research the regions of the brain below the cortex play an important role as we train our bodies’ movements and, critically, they interact more effectively after a night of sleep. While researchers knew that sleep helped us the learn sequences of movements (motor learning), it was not known why.
What One Little Stomach and One Big Lion Have The other night I had a dream that a big lion bit me in the stomach and I died. It was a sad dream. My family was there, and many friends, but no one could do a thing to save me. Please understand – this kind of dream is nothing...
Novel pathway for prevention of heart attack, stroke A recent study could pave the way for preventing brain and cardiac ischemia induced by atherosclerosis. Finnish researchers have found that the low-expression variant of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), which is particularly common among Finns, reduces the risk of heart attack and stroke. The finding revealed a promising new way to customize a potentially preventive drug for atherosclerosis.
ADHD children make poor decisions due to less differentiated learning processes Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders among school children. Pupils with ADHD often make poorer decisions than their unaffected classmates. Researchers have now discovered that different learning and decision-making mechanisms are responsible for these behaviors, and localized the underlying impairments in the brain.