Article Description
Blue in the Face: When the Other Person Just Have you felt frustrated because someone close to you just doesn’t “get it,” even though you’ve explained your point over and over? During those times, do you feel yourself getting enraged or shaking your head in disgust? We’re often under the illusion that if only the other person understood “the...
Headspace: Mental, Physical, and Social Health for Youth (Video) A brief look at Australia's Headspace national youth mental health service....
Miley Cyrus’s Road To Redemption? The MTV Video Music Awards aired recently. Last year Miley Cyrus (MC) made headlines twerking herself to fame. This year she had a homeless man accept her award for Video of the Year in what I hope was an effort to help advocate for homelessness awareness. I can’t help but...
Crying in Public: The Fear of Tears Learn to express anger as anger rather than as sorrow, so that your outrage isn't misread as grief; get the wiring sorted out so that the lines of emotional communication are as clear and direct as possible.
How neuroscience is being used to spread quackery in business and education By Matt Wall, Imperial College London During World War II, residents on the islands in the southern Pacific Ocean saw heavy activity by US planes, bringing in goods and supplies for the soldiers. In many cases, this was the islanders’ first exposure to 20th century goods and technology. After the war, when the cargo shipments [...]The post How neuroscience is being used to spread quackery in business and education appeared first on PsyPost.
Meet the pioneering researcher who is growing eyes and brain cells The train line from mainland Kobe is a marvel of urban transportation. Opened in 1981, Japan’s first driverless, fully automated train pulls out of Sannomiya station, guided smoothly along elevated tracks that stand precariously over the bustling city streets below, across the bay to the Port Island. The island, and much of the city, was [...]The post Meet the pioneering researcher who is growing eyes and brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
President plans more measures to improve health care for veterans Among other actions, new legislation devotes money to hire more providers to shorten waiting times.
When Happiness Isn’t a Choice American poet T. S. Eliot wrote: I said to my soul, be still and wait without hope, for hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love, for love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith, but the faith and the love are all...
No One Can Push Your Buttons Without Permission Many of us are quick to blame others for how we feel: “He makes me so mad!” or “She really hurt my feelings.” It is true that people can be hurtful and it is important to acknowledge when we are feeling that way. Denying our emotions will only make things...
Brain benefits from weight loss following bariatric surgery Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study. Bariatric surgery is used to help people who are dangerously obese lose weight. Bariatric surgery procedures are designed to restrict the amount of food you can eat before you feel full by reducing the stomach's size or limit the absorption of nutrients by removing part of the small intestine from the path food takes through the digestive tract.
This Strange Phenomenon Allows Scientists To Control People's Daydreams Ever heard of the Perky Effect? It sounds cutesy-poo, but it's an effect that has led to a decades-long investigation that reveals a startling truth. Even if you don't consciously control your dreams, you probably think you control your daydreams. But that might not actually be true....
Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer? Do you feel sadder watching a documentary about war or a drama about a young person dying of cancer? According to a new study, consumers mistakenly believe they will have stronger emotional reactions when stories are based on true events rather than fiction.
Can a Fight With Your Partner Re-Energize Your Sex Life? Many couples assume that conflict and fighting are the norm for most relationships, and that they are unrelated to their sex lives. But research and clinical observation shows how they are intertwined in ways that have major consequences for sex, romance, and the relationship for the long-term.
Embracing Our Bodies Despite Our Flaws Many of us are hesitant to accept our bodies because they’re “flawed.” We have stretch marks, cellulite, too-big thighs, too-small breasts, too-round bellies. We assume all these traits are terrible imperfections which preclude us from appreciating and loving our bodies. How can I accept something that is flawed? How can...
When Opposites Attract, Differences Can Be a Problem Mary* loves chick flicks. Her boyfriend Sam* likes action movies—the more violence, the better. She’s a vegetarian. He’s a meat and potatoes guy. “I love him, but we seem totally mismatched,” she says. “We can’t agree on a movie or a meal; how can we make important life choices, like where we’ll live or when we’ll start a family?”
Passive Aggressive Behaviors in School Do you work with a student who consistently performs at a level that is beneath his ability? Is there a child in your classroom who habitually procrastinates, predictably “forgets,” and inevitably dawdles the whole day long? Are you acquainted with a young person who harbors hostile feelings toward you or a classmate, but never expresses this anger in words?
Suicide Is Not the Answer to Your Situation You are at the end of your rope and you can’t take it any much longer. You are in pain and you are suffering and you feel there is no hope. The first thing that you need to do is to seek the services of a professional counselor. As a...
How to Learn and Master Any New Skill “I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul.” - William Ernest Henley When it comes to excelling and gaining mastery of a certain skill, it’s not an easy process. It takes years and years of consistent deliberate practice to shape and mold our mental and physical capabilities. The...
Study Answers Age-Old Question: Do People Prefer The Good News or The Bad News First? If there's good news and bad news, which do you prefer to hear first and which should you give first? Many management handbooks and websites recommend the so-called 'bad news sandwich' strategy. News-givers should hand out some good news first, then the bad, then finish off with the good. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Still Thinking About Your Ex? Why It’s Bad News for Your Current Partner How Just One Night’s Poor Sleep Can Hurt a Relationship What Can Self-Control Do For You? 10 New Studies Provide Surprising Answers New Study Affirms 4 Very Old-Fashioned Guidelines for a Good Marriage People Are More Moral in the Morning
The Most Important Relationship of All “Although many of us think of ourselves as thinking creatures that feel, biologically we are feeling creatures that think”      — Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, Neuroscientist and author of My Stroke of Insight. What is the most important relationship in your life? Your spouse? Your child? Your mother or father?...