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Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists who monitor – and control – increasing pressure within the eye. Now, a tiny eye implant developed at Stanford could enable patients to take more frequent readings from the comfort of home. Daily [...]The post Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments appeared first on PsyPost.
Wii Balance Board induces changes in the brains of MS patients A balance board accessory for a popular video game console can help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) reduce their risk of accidental falls, according to new research published online in the journal Radiology. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed that use of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board system appears to induce favorable changes in brain connections [...]The post Wii Balance Board induces changes in the brains of MS patients appeared first on PsyPost.
Patients with eating disorders have an increased risk of autoimmune diseases The risk of eating disorders has been shown to be increased in some somatic illnesses. Many of these illnesses, such as type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel diseases, present autoimmune etiology. In addition, a prior autoimmune disease has recently been shown to increase the risk of mood disorders and schizophrenia. Researchers at the University of [...]The post Patients with eating disorders have an increased risk of autoimmune diseases appeared first on PsyPost.
Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk Previous studies that have suggested an increased risk of autism among children of women who took antidepressants during pregnancy may actually reflect the known increased risk associated with severe maternal depression. In a study receiving advance online publication in Molecular Psychiatry, investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report that – while a diagnosis of autism spectrum [...]The post Study calls into question link between prenatal antidepressant exposure and autism risk appeared first on PsyPost.
Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products? A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, “greener” product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended [...]The post Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products? appeared first on PsyPost.
How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity? As their moral perspectives change, disillusioned churchgoers find it increasingly difficult to remain associated with their church, yet many also find it difficult to leave. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, former churchgoers experience deep identity crises as their most important relationships and beliefs are put at risk. “Our research examines [...]The post How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity? appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke marijuana New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence. The study, conducted by researchers in the University at Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions and Research Institute on Addictions (RIA), appeared in the online edition [...]The post Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke marijuana appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds young driver’s gender linked to crash type, injury severity Gender is often related to what type of severe or fatal crash a young male or young female driver will be involved in, according to a Kansas State University study. The university’s Sunanda Dissanayake, professor of civil engineering, and Niranga Amarasingha, doctoral student in civil engineering, looked at the gender differences and similarities of young [...]The post Study finds young driver’s gender linked to crash type, injury severity appeared first on PsyPost.
Focus on naturally occurring protein to tackle dementia Scientists at the University of Warwick have provided the first evidence that the lack of a naturally occurring protein is linked to early signs of dementia. Published in Nature Communications, the research found that the absence of the protein MK2/3 promotes structural and physiological changes to cells in the nervous system. These changes were shown to [...]The post Focus on naturally occurring protein to tackle dementia appeared first on PsyPost.
Blue in the Face: When the Other Person Just Have you felt frustrated because someone close to you just doesn’t “get it,” even though you’ve explained your point over and over? During those times, do you feel yourself getting enraged or shaking your head in disgust? We’re often under the illusion that if only the other person understood “the...
Headspace: Mental, Physical, and Social Health for Youth (Video) A brief look at Australia's Headspace national youth mental health service....
Miley Cyrus’s Road To Redemption? The MTV Video Music Awards aired recently. Last year Miley Cyrus (MC) made headlines twerking herself to fame. This year she had a homeless man accept her award for Video of the Year in what I hope was an effort to help advocate for homelessness awareness. I can’t help but...
Crying in Public: The Fear of Tears Learn to express anger as anger rather than as sorrow, so that your outrage isn't misread as grief; get the wiring sorted out so that the lines of emotional communication are as clear and direct as possible.
How neuroscience is being used to spread quackery in business and education By Matt Wall, Imperial College London During World War II, residents on the islands in the southern Pacific Ocean saw heavy activity by US planes, bringing in goods and supplies for the soldiers. In many cases, this was the islanders’ first exposure to 20th century goods and technology. After the war, when the cargo shipments [...]The post How neuroscience is being used to spread quackery in business and education appeared first on PsyPost.
Meet the pioneering researcher who is growing eyes and brain cells The train line from mainland Kobe is a marvel of urban transportation. Opened in 1981, Japan’s first driverless, fully automated train pulls out of Sannomiya station, guided smoothly along elevated tracks that stand precariously over the bustling city streets below, across the bay to the Port Island. The island, and much of the city, was [...]The post Meet the pioneering researcher who is growing eyes and brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
President plans more measures to improve health care for veterans Among other actions, new legislation devotes money to hire more providers to shorten waiting times.
When Happiness Isn’t a Choice American poet T. S. Eliot wrote: I said to my soul, be still and wait without hope, for hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love, for love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith, but the faith and the love are all...
No One Can Push Your Buttons Without Permission Many of us are quick to blame others for how we feel: “He makes me so mad!” or “She really hurt my feelings.” It is true that people can be hurtful and it is important to acknowledge when we are feeling that way. Denying our emotions will only make things...
Brain benefits from weight loss following bariatric surgery Weight loss surgery can curb alterations in brain activity associated with obesity and improve cognitive function involved in planning, strategizing and organizing, according to a new study. Bariatric surgery is used to help people who are dangerously obese lose weight. Bariatric surgery procedures are designed to restrict the amount of food you can eat before you feel full by reducing the stomach's size or limit the absorption of nutrients by removing part of the small intestine from the path food takes through the digestive tract.
This Strange Phenomenon Allows Scientists To Control People's Daydreams Ever heard of the Perky Effect? It sounds cutesy-poo, but it's an effect that has led to a decades-long investigation that reveals a startling truth. Even if you don't consciously control your dreams, you probably think you control your daydreams. But that might not actually be true....