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Doctor Who and the Neuroscience of Morality Malfunctions Has the Doctor misplaced one of his hearts? The latest version of the lead character on "Doctor Who" seems short on empathy and worries if regeneration has skewed his morality. Both brain injury and neural manipulations alter real people's empathic and moral abilities in terms of cognition, emotion, and compassion. To build concern for others, we first need it from others.
Celebrities are Humans Too I have been spending the afternoon glancing at celebrity gossip sites, and reading the many comments those kinds of sites bring. And I have to ask, have we forgotten that celebrities are human too? As members of the human race, we are allowed to make mistakes. Even entitled to make...
Once an Addict, Always an Addict? This is a saying I’ve always grappled with. One part of me is against any type of labeling, let alone a heavy label to be carried for the rest of your life. We are all so interchangeably dynamic, that to categorize someone into a box forever doesn’t sit well.  Another part...
To Thine Own Self Be Who? Part II You may have heard the expression, “To thine own self be true.” But what happens when you don’t know your true self? This is part II in a series of free self-tests aimed at helping you discover the real you.
Getting Creative in 17 Syllables Sometimes you play only to be amazed by the grace of the results. We came up with this: "Turn your laptop off/ And watch the sun cross the sky/ Time has no cursor."
6 Strategies to Take Control of Your Attitude and “Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.” - Zig Ziglar You may have heard the saying that “attitude is everything.” Whether you want to go that far or not, attitude is pretty damn important. I really doubt you’ll find a happy and successful person out there with a poor attitude....
What the behaviors of rats can teach us about our own eating habits By Aaron Blaisdell, University of California, Los Angeles Rats are very useful for studying human eating behaviour. Both rats and humans are omnivores, and both use flavour conditioning – learning through taste and experience which foods are good to eat and which to avoid. So if a particular flavour is associated with a desirable outcome [...]The post What the behaviors of rats can teach us about our own eating habits appeared first on PsyPost.
Collaborative care improves depression in teens How best to care for the many adolescents who have depression? In a collaborative care intervention, a care manager continually reached out to teens—delivering and following up on treatment in a primary-care setting (the office of a pediatrician or family doctor, not a psychiatrist or psychologist) at Group Health Cooperative. Depression outcomes after a year [...]The post Collaborative care improves depression in teens appeared first on PsyPost.
Sweet dreams? Client and therapist dreams of each other during psychodynamic psychotherapy During this study in Psychotherapy Research, the authors set out to interpret the content and consequences of client’s dreams about their therapists and vice versa. The analysis reveals some fascinating insights into client and therapist personalities, therapeutic relationships, and the psychotherapy process. The study took 63 adults from a psychology department clinic at a large public US university. [...]The post Sweet dreams? Client and therapist dreams of each other during psychodynamic psychotherapy appeared first on PsyPost.
Does food advertising make us eat more? On a daily basis we are surrounded with images of appetizing and often unhealthy food on TV adverts, billboards, in magazines and everywhere we go. With obesity on the rise, this article in Psychology & Healthraises questions about constant exposure to food cues and its effect on eating habits. Does it encourage over-indulgence? Are overweight people more vulnerable? The [...]The post Does food advertising make us eat more? appeared first on PsyPost.
6 Questions to Ask Yourself When Fear Starts Peeking Most of us have a “fight or flight” response to fear. We either get reactive about a perceived potential threat, or we want to retreat as far away from the potential danger as we can. The challenge is that fear is usually over a situation that isn’t actually happening at...
Study provides a neural explanation for why some skills are easier to learn than others Learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns, a study of monkeys has found. The scientists explored the brain’s capacity to learn through recordings of electrical activity of brain cell networks. The study was partly funded by the [...]The post Study provides a neural explanation for why some skills are easier to learn than others appeared first on PsyPost.
Eating healthy vs tanning: Carotenoid coloration more attractive than melanin coloration Forget sun beds, sunbathing and fake tanning lotions. The secret to a sexy, healthy glow lies in eating your five-a-day, reveals new breakthrough research from Taylor & Francis. A new and innovative study recently published in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology sheds new light on the importance of skin colour as a determiner of [...]The post Eating healthy vs tanning: Carotenoid coloration more attractive than melanin coloration appeared first on PsyPost.
Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain Chimpanzees are regarded as more intelligent than marmosets. Yet, like humans, it is marmosets that will often come to the aid of their fellow group members, even unprompted. This willingness to help is derived from cooperative breeding – and it explains the unique abilities of the human brain, as suggested by a study funded by [...]The post Cooperation shapes abilities of the human brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Conflicts with teachers are risk factor for school shootings As part of the TARGET project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, researchers at Freie Universität Berlin conducted a systematic literature search of all the available studies dealing with school shootings. The aim of the analysis was to clarify which social dynamics in the social network of perpetrators can be observed [...]The post Conflicts with teachers are risk factor for school shootings appeared first on PsyPost.
Bedsharing may impair sleep quality in infants Nocturnal awakenings are frequent among 6-month-old children, but sharing bed might make things worse. Bedsharing reduce infants sleep duration and leads to a higher number of awakenings, a new study suggests. Even though the researchers find an overall reduction in both sleep duration and nocturnal awakenings from 6 to 18 months of age, the chronicity [...]The post Bedsharing may impair sleep quality in infants appeared first on PsyPost.
Learning to read: tricking the brain While reading, children and adults alike must avoid confusing mirror-image letters (like b/d or p/q). Why is it difficult to differentiate these letters? When learning to read, our brain must be able to inhibit the mirror-generalization process, a mechanism that facilitates the recognition of identical objects regardless of their orientation, but also prevents the brain [...]The post Learning to read: tricking the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
No ADHD Excuses … Well, Maybe Just One To those of you who noticed that I missed publishing my blog on Friday, I have a good excuse. I have ADHD. No, I’m not going to tell you that I forgot, I’ve got a better imagination than that. I’m going to tell you a wee bit of a story....
Dealing with Insults: Don’t Take Anything Personally My friend is waiting for a table at a local restaurant. She is one of those table stalkers, who intuitively knows who is getting up when. She’s been hovering over a certain table for a good half hour. She is most certain the table is hers until some guy comes...
How to Stop Your Mind Wandering “The faculty of voluntarily bringing back a wandering attention, over and over again, is the very root of judgment, character, and will." -- William James Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Mindfulness at School Decreases Chance of Developing Depression Meditation: The Minimum Amount That Works Mindfulness: 6 Steps to Better Memory, Verbal Reasoning and Improved Concentration Meditation Benefits: 10 Ways It Helps Your Mind Meditation Can Reduce Loneliness in the Elderly