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A Highly Valued Personality Trait That Sadly Increases The Risk of Suicide This hidden cause of suicide might surprise you. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Blood Test for Suicide: Changes In One Gene Predict Suicide Risk How Cynical Personality Traits Affect Dementia Risk Higher Risk of Mental Illness for Those With Older Fathers The Vitamin Which May Reduce Risk of Alzheimer’s and Dementia OCD: The Surprising Truth
Will That New Electronic Device Shrink Your Brain? Last week’s cartoon is about how an obsession, or even a concern, can color your experience, and affect what you see and hear. All rights reserved, and content including cartoons is ©Donna Barstow 2014.  My main cartoon site is Donna Barstow Cartoons. And  you can Like me  on Facebook to...
Best of Our Blogs: September 26, 2014 When we are confused, we want answers. When we are lost, we so want to be found. When we are lonely, we want to fill our moments with the chatter of anything, the television, the internet, with others. When we feel empty, we want to fill the holes in our...
Happy Blog Anniversary Last Sunday was the three year anniversary of this blog, ADHD Man of DistrAction. So this is my anniversary week, so to speak. How did I celebrate? Glad you asked. This is a blog about ADHD, so I did the same thing I do every week. I performed perfect examples...
Autism : What You Thought You Knew May be Wrong A Michigan mother put two grills with smoldering charcoal in the back of her van and told her 15-year old daughter the two of them were boing camping. The daughter, Issy, had just been released days before from a residential program for autistic kids. Kelli, the mother, claimed she couldn’t...
iMoan The release of the new iPhone 6 reminds me of the five virtues of complaining I have so rashly left behind.
Curry spice 'helps brain self-heal' An early study in rats suggests the spice turmeric may help boost the brain's ability to repair and regenerate itself.
Fostering Health & Wellness in the Introverted Child: Part Introversion is a topic that is becoming more and more researched, discussed, and understood. Children who tend to be introverts may present with many different qualities such as the following: are often quiet especially around new people can be emotionally sensitive need space (physical and mental space) are likely to...
Turmeric compound boosts regeneration of brain stem cells A bioactive compound found in turmeric promotes stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain, reveals new research. The findings suggest aromatic turmerone could be a future drug candidate for treating neurological disorders, such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease.
Talk therapy – not medication – best for social anxiety disorder, large study finds While antidepressants are the most commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder, new research suggests that cognitive behavioral therapy is more effective and, unlike medication, can have lasting effects long after treatment has stopped.
8 Practical Suggestions for Parents of Kids with ADHD The school year is back upon us, and parents of kids with ADHD probably could use some support and tips. So here are some suggestions: 1. Manage your expectations. Children with ADHD have a legitimate neurological condition that impairs planning, organization, impulse control, focus, and attention. ADHD cannot be cured,...
How Does Our Childhood Affect our Ability to Say No? We all have trouble saying “no” every now and again – do you think there’s a reason why we find it so hard? ‘NO’ This has just got to be one of the first words we all learn as infants! Mum: “Susie, sit up at the table!” Susie: “No!” ‘No’ seems to be so easy […]
Are You “Too Sensitive”? When Karen’s boyfriend Kurt pushes her buttons, she blows up. He knows that she can’t stand comparison with other women, so he tells her about Mary down at the office and what a great conversationalist she is. Karen is angry at herself, as if this praise of Mary implied that...
On Surviving a Car Crash After surviving a car crash, I feel incredibly fortunate to be healthy and alive. There seems to be an enhanced freshness and ‘is-ness’ to everything I see. Why does appreciation have such a powerful positive effect? Why is it the most important factor in overall well-being?
The dangers of teens using marijuana Whether states should legalize marijuana for recreational and medical use is a hot topic across the country. As the debates continue a potentially dangerous environment is being created where more preteens, teens and young adults are beginning to use the substance with the feeling that it is safe.
Out of Control Sexual Behavior: Addiction or Offending? When It Comes to Sex, Confusion Reigns After more than two decades spent treating both sexual addicts and the occasional offender, I’ve watched the field of sexual disorders assessment and treatment come very far in its understanding of both sexual addiction and sexual offending. Nevertheless, the general public is often...
How to Know if You’re Truly Resilient If there’s a word people in the top ranks of human capital are buzzing about these days, it’s resilience. I get asked all the time what it means — followed by questions about how to get more of it. I’ve done lots (and lots) of reading and thinking and speaking...
The Best Alternative To Bickering Five steps for translating your frustrations into efficient, effective romantic solutions.
Genes causing pediatric glaucoma contribute to future stroke Knowledge of stroke's genetic underpinnings has become clearer through a study that demonstrates that, in some cases, it originates in infancy. The research identifies two genes (FOXC1 and PITX2) that cause cerebral small vessel disease, a "pre-stroke" condition that increases the risk of future stroke up to ten times. It was found the mutations result in cerebral small vessel disease in patients as young as one year of age.
Yoga, meditation may help train brain to help people control computers with their mind People who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience, new research by biomedical engineers shows. The research could have major implications for treatments of people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases.