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Why You Should Treasure Apparently Mundane Moments in Life Study tests which memories can make us happy in the future. People rarely miss a chance to record the highlights of their lives. Phones, albums and social media sites are full to bursting with holiday snaps, wedding videos, baby photos, and all the rest. But even the more mundane... Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:How Aging Changes What Makes You Happy 4 Life-Savouring Strategies: Which Ones Work Best? Mindfulness at School Decreases Chance of Developing Depression What Might Have Been: The Benefits of Counter-Factual Thinking 6 Rules for a Happy Life and Healthier Environment
The Psychology of Personal Space: Seat Reclining Over the past few weeks, we’ve heard more and more accounts of airline flights being diverted because of an argument over reclining seats. Reclining seats are obviously not the problem — they’ve been available on most airlines’ flights for the past five decades. The problem is that as airlines seek...
How to Argue to Live Authentically, 2 of 3 Like it or not, you are the one constant in your relationship. If your couple relationship is in on the rocks and you’re left wondering why you seem to “attract” certain types of partners, here’s a sobering thought that has can also potentially uplift and empower you to chart a new...
How to Argue to Strengthen Your Couple Relationship, 2 Like it or not, you are the one constant in your relationship. If your couple relationship is on the rocks and you’re wondering why you seem to “attract” certain issues or partners, here’s a sobering thought (and potentially uplifting): What you bring to your relationship is a life-shaping power. If you’re not consciously...
More evidence happiness doesn't come from buying new things Research shows that there is something intrinsically unpleasant about anticipating the purchase of a material good, which may put shoppers on edge and help create the conditions for violence.
Why HIV patients develop dementia Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. Researchers have now successfully identified mechanisms how infected cells can activate brain-specific immune cells which subsequently display harmful behaviour and lead to the destruction of neurons.
My sobriety depends on treating both alcoholism and depression Last week I celebrated 16 years of sobriety. Let me say that again because I can’t believe it: Last week I celebrated 16 years of sobriety. What a long, strange trip it’s been. The first 8 years of my sobriety were filled with mayhem: divorce, single-working motherhood, death of my...
How Can You Tell if Play Therapy Works? Go to Google Scholar, type in the term “play therapy” and you will find hundreds of studies with hundreds of results, some positive and some negative. So does play therapy actually work? It depends on what you call play therapy, how you use it, who you use it with, and...
Couples You Meet in Counseling #3: Mr. and Mrs. In my previous two posts, I examined Mr. Perfect and his Crazy Wife, and the Ice Queen and the Martyr. Both of those couples are easier to work with in couples counseling than #3, Mr. and Mrs. Just Not Feeling It.  Emotionally, this couple acts like they are already divorced, and have been...
Comply Or Defy, ADHD Reaction To Routine And Structure I’ve written about routine and structure before. I’ve blatantly stated: “Structure good, routine bad!” And I’ve explained it. Structure allows some freedom within it’s confines, providing more of a guide to life. Routine allows no freedoms, providing instead a regimen that allows no room for creativity or variety. But even...
Now we know why it’s so hard to deceive children By Emma Blakey, University of Sheffield Daily interactions require bargaining, be it for food, money or even making plans. These situations inevitably lead to a conflict of interest as both parties seek to maximise their gains. To deal with them, we need to understand the other person’s intentions, beliefs and desires and then use that [...]The post Now we know why it’s so hard to deceive children appeared first on PsyPost.
Community music programs enhance brain function in at-risk children A new Northwestern University study provides the first direct evidence that a community music program for at-risk youth has a biological effect on children’s developing nervous systems. Two years of music lessons improved the precision with which the children’s brains distinguished similar speech sounds, a neural process that is linked to language and reading skills. [...]The post Community music programs enhance brain function in at-risk children appeared first on PsyPost.
Melatonin does not reduce delirium in elderly patients having acute hip surgery Melatonin supplements do not appear to lessen delirium in elderly people undergoing surgery for hip fractures, indicates a new trial published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) Many older patients in hospital experience delirium, with disturbances in their sleep–wake cycle. Antipsychotic medications used to reduce symptoms have serious adverse effects, leading the US Food and Drug [...]The post Melatonin does not reduce delirium in elderly patients having acute hip surgery appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain circuit differences reflect divisions in social status Life at opposite ends of primate social hierarchies is linked to specific brain networks, a new Oxford University study has shown. The importance of social rank is something we all learn at an early age. In non-human primates, social dominance influences access to food and mates. In humans, social hierarchies influence our performance everywhere from [...]The post Brain circuit differences reflect divisions in social status appeared first on PsyPost.
How Swedish children learn English through gaming By Pia Sundqvist, Karlstads University and Liss Kerstin Sylvén, University of Gothenburg, Sweden An hour of homework or an hour of World of Warcraft? It’s not hard to guess what many ten-year-old boys would rather be doing when they get home from school. But now research shows that in non-English speaking countries, children are picking [...]The post How Swedish children learn English through gaming appeared first on PsyPost.
If You Got a Second Chance A thought experiment that could point you in a direction.
Characteristics Of The Stalker: Know What To Look For When you think of the word stalker what comes to mind? Do you think violence and vengefulness? Do you think fear on the part of the stalker? Do you think about the stalker’s lack of communication skills or even mental health problem(s)? Many people would agree that the first thing that comes...
Recently Dumped? Skips the Lies and Tell Yourself This Some men are only after one thing: a power struggle. Pulling your hair out, perplexed and frustrated as to why the man you love doesn’t seem to reciprocate your unrequited love? After all, you know that no other woman will ever be as caring and loving as you are with...
Understanding Rejection in Personal Relationships Rejection is one person saying to the other — “Keep away, I don’t want you around me now. ” Such a message often hits exactly in the center of our ego and shakes our self worth.  Thus both giving and receiving a message of rejection has to be handled with sensitivity....
Why Are You Single? International Edition By now, you have probably seen far too many of those “why are you single” articles. Way too often, the authors treat singlehood as a disease that needs to be cured, and they tell you what you did wrong that led you to get (or stay) sick. I’ve made fun...