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Narcissist, Machiavellian, or Just Self-Centered? Let’s face it. Many people are out for themselves – trying to get ahead, to take advantage, and to get as much as they can. When does looking out for Number One go too far?
Three Reasons Why We Shouldn't Confuse Selfies with Vanity Everywhere you turn, someone is worrying about or debating the perceived epidemic levels of vanity and narcissism thought to motivate selfies and other forms of self-oriented social media behavior. However, framing the issue as one of superficial self-aggrandizement may be neither accurate nor useful. Here are at least three reasons why...
Handling Fears: Three Ways Fear Is Your Friend, 1 of 2 When we get triggered by an event, it’s tempting to follow the accompanying thoughts down a rabbit hole to the useless world of doubts and negative forecasts, and other “oh no’s and “what if’s.” Doing so is usually counterproductive however and likely to intensify fear instead to the point of activating defense...
Best of Our Blogs: September 30, 2014 Every difficult person, the rude cashier, the ungrateful relative, and the draining friend could be excuses for your bad day, maybe even an unhappy life. But they could also be like the sound of your fan blowing in the background-simply white noise. What you choose to zoom in on and...
Can children be made more psychologically resilient to traumas like 9/11? “It was one of those perfect days. I think that’s what everyone remembers. And now whenever the day’s too perfect and the sky’s too blue, I think: what might happen?” September 11, 2001. Lisa Siegman was in her first year as principal of Public School 3 (PS 3) in downtown Manhattan. Up on the fourth [...]The post Can children be made more psychologically resilient to traumas like 9/11? appeared first on PsyPost.
Do You Have Caffeine Use Disorder? When your love for coffee and Coke is a little too much? This cute cartoon will give you the answer.
Introverts' Quick-Start Guide, Part 1 The Introvert Manifesto by Peter Vogt is the latest addition to the increasingly popular literature for and about introverts. My favorite thing about his book is how deeply he shares from his own experience—what rocks as well as jolts his world as an introvert, and what he’s learned to do about it. Central to that is his useful tool, The 4 Pillars of Introvert Well-Being.
Brain structures differ among media multitaskers Study shows that the brains of multitaskers look significantly different from those who commit to only one task.
How disappointment works in the brain Researchers believe that competing neurotransmitters in the brain might be an avenue that leads to the discovery of a new generation of antidepressants.
The Proof Is In The Pudding – Er Baked Goods         Thanks to a short but fantastic blurb by Lindsay Lowe on the Parade website, I discovered a remarkable pop-up bakery called Depressed Cake Shop. A place where you can buy dozens of grey and gloomy sweet treats. This bakery, through their deliciousness, raise awareness (and monies)...
ADHD & Low Self-Esteem: Helping Kids with ADHD Improve According to Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S., Associate Editor at Psych Central, children with ADHD can experience low self-esteem. Some of the staple characteristics of ADHD include not being able to focus, not being able to complete tasks especially not in a timely manner, being distracted easily, and being impulsive. All of...
Porn Addiction: Not the Whole Story The issue of whether porn addiction is real has produced a storm of controversy. Yet all this noise may be distracting us from a graver risk to healthy sexuality: sexual conditioning of adolescents. I monitor a number of popular online recovery forums. I have read self-reports of thousands of otherwise...
Study finds twitches during sleep activate the brain in a unique way A University of Iowa study has found twitches made during sleep activate the brains of mammals differently than movements made while awake. Researchers say the findings show twitches during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep comprise a different class of movement and provide further evidence that sleep twitches activate circuits throughout the developing brain. In this [...]The post Study finds twitches during sleep activate the brain in a unique way appeared first on PsyPost.
Brief depression questionnaires could lead to unnecessary antidepressant prescriptions Known as “brief depression symptom measures,” the self-administered questionnaires are used in primary care settings to determine the frequency and severity of depression symptoms among patients. Several questionnaires have been developed to help reduce untreated depression, a serious mental illness that can jeopardize relationships, employment and quality of life and increase the risks of heart disease, drug [...]The post Brief depression questionnaires could lead to unnecessary antidepressant prescriptions appeared first on PsyPost.
A ‘frenemy’ in Parkinson’s disease takes to crowdsourcing The protein alpha-synuclein is a well-known player in Parkinson’s disease and other related neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. Its normal functions, however, have long remained unknown. An enticing mystery, say researchers, who contend that understanding the normal is critical in resolving the abnormal. Alpha-synuclein typically resides at presynaptic terminals – the communication [...]The post A ‘frenemy’ in Parkinson’s disease takes to crowdsourcing appeared first on PsyPost.
#118 When is a Mom Not a Mom?? The dilemma for women who are mothers is about how much time and energy they will give to their children and how much they will keep for themselves. Though more women are working outside than they were way back in the 70’s, the questions still remain. How much do we...
Scientists identify the signature of aging in the brain How the brain ages is still largely an open question – in part because this organ is mostly insulated from direct contact with other systems in the body, including the blood and immune systems. In research that was recently published in Science, Weizmann Institute researchers Prof. Michal Schwartz of the Neurobiology Department and Dr. Ido [...]The post Scientists identify the signature of aging in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Who are the men and boys suffering from anorexia? A new study by researchers from the University of Montreal reveals the current state of knowledge about anorexia in men and boys. “Most of the knowledge about anorexia pertains to females. However, about 10% of persons affected are males, and we believe this figure is underestimated,” says Laurence Corbeil-Serre, lead author of the study. “Our [...]The post Who are the men and boys suffering from anorexia? appeared first on PsyPost.
Single-neuron ‘hub’ orchestrates activity of an entire brain circuit The idea of mapping the brain is not new. Researchers have known for years that the key to treating, curing, and even preventing brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury, is to understand how the brain records, processes, stores, and retrieves information. New Tel Aviv University research published in PLOS Computational [...]The post Single-neuron ‘hub’ orchestrates activity of an entire brain circuit appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers identify brain changes involved in alcohol-related sleep disturbances A review article published online in Behavioral Brain Research provides novel insight into changes that happen in the brain as a result of chronic alcohol exposure that can lead to disruptions in the sleep cycle. Clinical assessments and research indicate that individuals with alcohol use disorders frequently suffer from severely disrupted sleep. This can occur [...]The post Researchers identify brain changes involved in alcohol-related sleep disturbances appeared first on PsyPost.