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Gaming vs. reading: Do they benefit teenagers with cognition or school performance? Children have an increasing attraction towards electronic media in their play.  With video games, phones and the internet in abundance, this article in Educational Psychology examines if such leisure activity is impacting children’s cognition or academic performance or whether it would be more beneficial to read. After a busy day children do need downtime to [...]The post Gaming vs. reading: Do they benefit teenagers with cognition or school performance? appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Smoking cannabis doesn’t make you more creative People often think that smoking cannabis makes them more creative. However, research by Leiden psychologists Lorenza Colzato and Mikael Kowal shows that the opposite is true. They published their findings on 7 October in Psychopharmacology. Strong cannabis doesn’t work The findings show that cannabis with a high concentration of the psychoactive ingredient THC does not [...]The post Study: Smoking cannabis doesn’t make you more creative appeared first on PsyPost.
Research reveals that children as young as five can gauge when adults are overconfident From how to tie a shoelace to learning the words for colours, kids have lots to learn — and for the most part, they depend on others to teach it to them. But whether deliberately or inadvertently, people sometimes misinform. So at what age can kids tell trustworthy teachers from confidence tricksters? A new study [...]The post Research reveals that children as young as five can gauge when adults are overconfident appeared first on PsyPost.
A glimpse into the 3D brain: How memories form People who wish to know how memory works are forced to take a glimpse into the brain. They can now do so without bloodshed: RUB researchers have developed a new method for creating 3D models of memory-relevant brain structures. They published their results in the trade journal “Frontiers in Neuroanatomy”. The way neurons are interconnected [...]The post A glimpse into the 3D brain: How memories form appeared first on PsyPost.
How to Make Sure Your Online Photos are Copyright-Friendly Graphics and pictures are a great way to enhance your social media engagement for your private mental health practice. They add something that words cannot, they show personality, they can break up large blocks of text, and they add visual interest. However, in our Internet age, there is a very...
Prejudices about money Financial planners need to understand that their feelings about wealth are in fact their feelings — not necessarily their clients'.
Motivational Poem Numerous poems have been written through the ages. Some have been recited because they have motivated someone and is the underlying component of someone’s success story.   I found this motivational poem and thought that it is a poem we should live by. It has motivated me in many ways- to...
When Divorcing, Don't Hire a Pit Bill Attorney Many think that when they divorce they need to find a lawyer who is a “fighter,” or “pit bull.” You do want someone who will fight for you, but someone who wields the truth, savvy and true caring, not sharp teeth.
Healthy lifestyle may cut stroke risk in half for women Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study. The study looked at five factors that make up a healthy lifestyle: healthy diet; moderate alcohol consumption; never smoking; physically active; and healthy body mass index (BMI). Compared with women with none of the five healthy factors, women with all five factors had a 54-percent lower risk of stroke.
Mind-controlled prosthetic arms that work in daily life are now a reality For the first time, robotic prostheses controlled via implanted neuromuscular interfaces have become a clinical reality. A novel osseointegrated (bone-anchored) implant system gives patients new opportunities in their daily life and professional activities. In January 2013 a Swedish arm amputee was the first person in the world to receive a prosthesis with a direct connection [...]The post Mind-controlled prosthetic arms that work in daily life are now a reality appeared first on PsyPost.
Cold temperatures make people cold-hearted, study on moral judgments finds Research has found that warm temperatures make people more likely to “warm up” to others and cooperate. Now research has shown the inverse to be true: cold temperatures make people more “cold-hearted” and less empathetic. A team of Japanese researchers has discovered that physical coldness promotes utilitarian moral judgments by reducing empathic concerns and emotional [...]The post Cold temperatures make people cold-hearted, study on moral judgments finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Another med change Being beautifully bipolar comes with its ups and downs. Many people equate living with bipolar disorder to being on a roller coaster – up and down, up and down. Medication changes come with the ride. Today I walked into my psychiatrist’s office and told him we needed to make some...
Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls’ greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression. The findings are published [...]The post Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk appeared first on PsyPost.
Gay and bisexual youth can thrive with positive family relationships Gay and bisexual youth who are supported by their family and feel comfortable talking to them about their lifestyle are less likely to become involved in high-risk sexual behaviors, according to a recent Rutgers study. Published in the Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, the Rutgers School of Social Work study, “Condoms and Connection: Parents, [...]The post Gay and bisexual youth can thrive with positive family relationships appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists use snail research to help explain ‘chemo brain’ It is estimated that as many as half of patients taking cancer drugs experience a decrease in mental sharpness. While there have been many theories, what causes “chemo brain” has eluded scientists. In an effort to solve this mystery, neuroscientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) conducted an experiment in [...]The post Neuroscientists use snail research to help explain ‘chemo brain’ appeared first on PsyPost.
In a battle of brains, bigger isn’t always better It’s one of those ideas that seems to make perfect sense: the bigger the brain, the more intelligent the creature. While it is generally true, exceptions are becoming increasingly common. Yet the belief persists even among scientists. Most biologists, for example, assume that rats, with larger brains, are smarter than mice. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory [...]The post In a battle of brains, bigger isn’t always better appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Warning Signs You’re Being Objectified Where is the line between healthy attraction and objectification? Know the warning signs now! A new study shows that objectification can be linked to sexual coercion in romantic relationships. This is not surprising, for several reasons. More alarmingly, objectification is also statistically linked to sexual violence. This is also not surprising....
Paying Attention to Our Bodies Author Tina Welling had no idea that she had an underactive thyroid. She was experiencing all the symptoms, such as weakness and frequent infections. She was canceling meetings and outings with friends. Her work schedule was getting tougher and tougher to keep up with. But she hadn’t noticed any of...
Researchers find drug used for another disease slows progression of Parkinson’s A new study from UCLA found that a drug being evaluated to treat an entirely different disorder helped slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease in mice. The study, published in the October edition of the journalNeurotherapeutics, found that the drug, AT2101, which has also been studied for Gaucher disease, improved motor function, stopped inflammation in [...]The post Researchers find drug used for another disease slows progression of Parkinson’s appeared first on PsyPost.
Childhood eating difficulties could be a sign of underlying psychological issues Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital are warning parents that difficult eaters could have underlying psychological issues, as they have found that restrictive behaviours can appear before puberty. “Many researchers believe that bulimia only appears at adolescence, but our studies indicate that the problem can arises much earlier. [...]The post Childhood eating difficulties could be a sign of underlying psychological issues appeared first on PsyPost.