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Verbal and physical bullying decrease as children age, but cyberbullying increases: study As students’ age they are verbally and physically bullied less but cyberbullied more, non-native English speakers are not bullied more often than native English speakers and bullying increases as students’ transition from elementary to middle school. Those are among the findings of a wide-ranging paper, “Examination of the Change in Latent Statuses in Bullying Behaviors [...]The post Verbal and physical bullying decrease as children age, but cyberbullying increases: study appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds air pollution is harmful to young brains Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calderón-Garcidueñas, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. Calderón-Garcidueñas’ findings are detailed in a paper [...]The post Study finds air pollution is harmful to young brains appeared first on PsyPost.
Can your blood type affect your memory? People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. AB is the least common blood type, found in about 4 [...]The post Can your blood type affect your memory? appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists decode brain maps to discover how we take aim Serena Williams won her third consecutive US Open title a few days ago, thanks to reasons including obvious ones like physical strength and endurance. But how much did her brain and its egocentric and allocentric functions help the American tennis star retain the cup? Quite significantly, according to York University neuroscience researchers whose recent study [...]The post Neuroscientists decode brain maps to discover how we take aim appeared first on PsyPost.
Diverse neighborhoods may help infants’ social learning Experiencing diverse communities by hearing different languages at the park, on a bus or in the grocery store may make babies more open-minded in their social learning, a new study finds. While previous research has shown that direct interactions with parents and caregivers shape early cognitive development, the influence of the broader community beyond those [...]The post Diverse neighborhoods may help infants’ social learning appeared first on PsyPost.
Study provides more evidence that sleep apnea is hurting your brain Employing a measure rarely used in sleep apnea studies, researchers at the UCLA School of Nursing have uncovered evidence of what may be damaging the brain in people with the sleep disorder — weaker brain blood flow. In the study, published Aug. 28 in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE, researchers measured blood flow in the brain [...]The post Study provides more evidence that sleep apnea is hurting your brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Association between sunshine and suicide examined in study Lower rates of suicide are associated with more daily sunshine in the prior 14 to 60 days. Light interacts with brain serotonin systems and possibly influences serotonin-related behaviors. Those behaviors, such as mood and impulsiveness, can play a role in suicide. The authors examined the relationship between suicide and the duration of sunshine after mathematically [...]The post Association between sunshine and suicide examined in study appeared first on PsyPost.
The State of Singles in the U.S., for a In the Netherlands, a publication called Individual and Society is about to publish its 100th issue. They have a theme – the state of single people around the world. They have asked people in different countries to write brief overviews of single people in their country, which they will translate...
The Common Mental Habit that Creates Negative Cascade of Stuff goes wrong, right? There isn’t a fix for that. We live in an imperfect world. The question is, are you doing the one thing that has been scientifically proven to take things from bad to worse? The simple mental habit mentioned below has been shown to create the following...
Creativity Can Be a Fearful Flyer’s Best Friend I’m a recovered fearful flyer who experienced a setback this year, and I have to brush up on my anxiety prevention skills. Of course I knew this could happen. Apparently membership in the Fearful Flyers Club is for life. I try not to despair. But when it comes down to...
Healthy Self-Esteem versus Healthy Narcissism Response to a comment about yesterday's post, which tries to clear the air about where the "sub-clinical" version of narcissism I discussed fits into a conception of healthy self-esteem versus pathological narcissism.
Finding Hope from an Attempt Survivor on World Suicide (Video) An attempt survivor talks about his experience, recovery, and hope....
The Neuroscience of Resistance and How to Overcome It! We all experience resistance everyday when we’re trying to do something that matters. Whether you want to sit and meditate, work on a new project, get out and exercise, whatever it is that is in the direction of growth, resistance comes alive. In my next book Uncovering Happiness (can’t wait...
Impact of violent media on the brain: Depends on each individual's brain circuitry, study finds With the longstanding debate over whether violent movies cause real world violence as a backstop, a study has found that each person's reaction to violent images depends on that individual's brain circuitry, and on how aggressive they were to begin with.
The Mysterious Case of Primate Peacefulness Some primates show us how peace can win out over violence.
What if I had died when I tried to commit suicide? Image courtesy of 9comeback at FreeDigitalPhotos.net   My post is a little late this week because I wanted to write something for today – World Suicide Prevention Day. You see I have made that choice – whether to continue living or to die. I have held my life in the...
How brain can tell magnitude of errors Researchers have made another advance in understanding how the brain detects errors caused by unexpected sensory events. This type of error detection is what allows the brain to learn from its mistakes, which is critical for improving fine motor control.
The Einstellung Effect Proves That a Good Idea Can Be A Very Bad Idea The perfect is the enemy of the good. We know that phrase very well. What the Einstellung Effect proves is the good can be a real enemy of the even better. When we have a solution that's good, we can't begin to think about a better one....
Too: The ADHD Adverb Am I too late? I hope not. I don’t like being late. I especially don’t like being too late. It’s too troubling and causes too much anxiety. I get too late from being too easily distracted. Too often I forget to check the time. Then I try to make up...
World Suicide Prevention Day, 2014 Every day around the world, families and friends grieve the loss of a loved one due to suicide. Not once. Not twice. But over 2,000 times per day someone takes their own life. Can you imagine? If Ebola took 2,000 people’s lives per day, we’d hear a world outcry and...