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Sometimes, adolescents just can’t resist Don’t get mad the next time you catch your teenager texting when he promised to be studying. He simply may not be able to resist. A University of Iowa study found teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. The findings may help explain, for example, why [...]The post Sometimes, adolescents just can’t resist appeared first on PsyPost.
Elderly who have had serious falls may show symptoms of post-traumatic stress Older adults who experience a serious fall may develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the days following the event, finds a study. Women, people who were unemployed or who had less education were more likely to report post-traumatic stress symptoms, as were those with injuries to the back or chest.
Say ‘ahh’ to let your smartphone check for Parkinson’s disease By Pete Shadbolt, Imperial College London Smartphones are designed to be curious. Having already learned about your friendships, your family and the pattern of your daily routine, designers are now interested in your health and fitness. A new crop of apps and wearable devices continuously measure and analyse vital signs such as movement and heart [...]The post Say ‘ahh’ to let your smartphone check for Parkinson’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Reading Harry Potter Could Make You A Better Person Three studies suggest that J.K. Rowling's storytelling style can sow the seeds of empathy in the minds of her readers....
Another Study Links Compulsive Sexual Behavior to Other Forms Status Quo (For Now) In mid-July I published a blog discussing a recently released fMRI (brain imaging) study showing that the brain activity of sex addicts, when they are shown pornography, mirrors the brain activity of drug addicts when they are exposed to drug-related imagery. That research strongly suggested that...
Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of PTSD New research offers hope for those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Researchers there have shown that a breathing-based meditation practice called Sudarshan Kriya Yoga can be an effective treatment for PTSD.
How Music Heightens Our Experiences There’s a whimsical, charming scene in Begin Again, starring Keira Knightly, Mark Ruffalo and Adam Levine, that showcases two of the characters strolling through the streets of New York City, bonding through music. The gold and silver lights of Times Square shimmer in the dark, and earbuds are plugged in...
The Creation of a Bully, The Creation of Anxiety An active temperament predisposes to creating a bully in the context of parental abuse. A passive temperament predisposes to anxiety and masochism in the context of parental abuse.
Sometimes a Little Help from Our Friends Hurts It has been well-documented that perceived support is associated with greater health and well-being, but the effects of actually getting help from others are mixed. Sometimes, it makes us feel good, but other times it doesn't help, and can even make us feel worse. New research shows how help from our loved ones can threaten our self-worth.
Only Connect: How Colleges Could Work Better A new book offers helpful suggestions for improving the curricular and co-curricular experience of college students.
Brain differences: Sometimes, adolescents just can't resist A new study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.
Owls provides clues on how humans focus attention Research with barn owls reveals how the brain decides what it should pay attention to among competing external events.
Neurochemical imbalance in schizophrenia discovered Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers have discovered that neurons from patients with schizophrenia secrete higher amounts of three neurotransmitters broadly implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders.
Psychology Lessons from the Ray Rice Fiasco Over the past few days, the sports media has been focused almost exclusively on the story of Ray Rice. Ray Rice was a superstar running back for the Baltimore Ravens who, before the summer, was caught on a security camera dragging his fiancé (now wife) out of an elevator, believed...
Suicide Prevention: The Most Powerful Words You Should Never On the evening of September 10th, I walked for suicide prevention as the sunset at Gilchrist park, Punta Gorda. I was given the above-piece of paper to pin on my shirt and to write “WHO” I was walking for? “I AM WALKING FOR”…many walked for loved ones that had lost...
A Message For All Private Practice Owners Have you ever shopped for a therapist before? It builds a lot of empathy for our clients. Just get on any directory and look for an issues such as anxiety or depression and read through the profiles of the therapists listed. How do you choose? After awhile your eyes might...
7 Picture Books That Can Help Adults & Teens For some adults and adolescents, picture books can offer a non-threatening way to explore their feelings and emotions....
3 Tips for Sparking Your Kids’ Creativity “Creativity is a gift, given in some measure to all of us,” said Tom Sturges, an accomplished music executive, author, teacher and speaker. For over 15 years, Sturges has mentored and taught thousands of students to explore their creativity, “to let their creative instinct ‘emerge’ rather than to force it...
Childhood Emotional Neglect: Real People, Real Stories Today I wish to share some of the most powerful words there are: the words of real people sharing their stories. Some were emailed to me (with permission to share), and some were posted as comments on my website. Here is a sampling of the real words of people who...
Is the pattern of brain folding a 'fingerprint' for schizophrenia? Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human brain is aware that the outside layer, or cortex, of the brain is folded in an intricate pattern of “hills”, called gyri, and “valleys”, called sulci. It turns out that the patterns of cortical folding are largely consistent across healthy humans, broadly speaking. However, disturbances in cortical folding patterns suggest deeper disturbances in brain structure and function..