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Chemical signals in the brain help guide risky decisions A gambler’s decision to stay or fold in a game of cards could be influenced by a chemical in the brain, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. The rise and fall of dopamine plays a key role in decisions involving risk and reward, from a baseball player trying to steal a base [...]The post Chemical signals in the brain help guide risky decisions appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists show that nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide and is associated with approximately 440,000 deaths in the United States each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population continues to smoke cigarettes. While more than half of U.S. smokers try to quit [...]The post Scientists show that nicotine withdrawal reduces response to rewards across species appeared first on PsyPost.
Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mice that were treated with these compounds 24-36 hours after experiencing TBI from a blast injury were protected from the harmful effects of TBI, including problems with learning, memory, and [...]The post Compound protects brain cells after traumatic brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
You can classify words in your sleep When people practice simple word classification tasks before nodding off—knowing that a “cat” is an animal or that “flipu” isn’t found in the dictionary, for example—their brains will unconsciously continue to make those classifications even in sleep. The findings, reported in the Cell Press journalCurrent Biology on September 11, show that some parts of the brain [...]The post You can classify words in your sleep appeared first on PsyPost.
Joan Rivers’ “Can We Talk?” Therapy Much has been written about standup comic Joan Rivers after her recent tragic death.  However, not many people know about the tragedies she dealt with in life.  For example, after she was fired from her own late night talk show, and the subsequent suicide of her husband, Edgar Rosenberg, she...
4 Ways to Make Your Website Mobile-Friendly More and more people are using their phones to search the internet.  By optimizing your online content for mobile devices, your clients can more efficiently access the information and services your therapy practice provides.   It has been said that 2014 is the year of the mobile.  People are increasingly...
Do You Have a Spirit Animal? Recently, I was inspired to pen an article that explored the topic: What is my spirit animal? The desire to write this piece came to me after speaking with a friend of mine, Ben, who is a member of the Oneida Tribe of Indians. According to Ben, several Native Indian...
9 11: Remember World Trade Center’s Twin Towers: 9 11 Tribute with Twin Towers Memorial. I felt compelled to draw the above tribute today.  I kept seeing images of the World Trade Center in my mind but it was transparent – fading ~ yet it was an ever-present, unabating image.  If you read...
How You Can Find Gratitude When You’re Overwhelmed with It’s pretty easy to feel grateful when good things happen. Win the lottery or fall in love? Easy. But what if you lose your spouse, or child, or even your job, how do we find gratitude then? Scientifically, we know gratitude is strongly linked to well being. People just feel...
Stem cells help researchers understand how schizophrenic brains function Using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), researchers have gained new insight into what may cause schizophrenia by revealing the altered patterns of neuronal signaling associated with this disease. They did so by exposing neurons derived from the hiPSCs of healthy individuals and of patients with schizophrenia to potassium chloride, which triggered these stem cells [...]The post Stem cells help researchers understand how schizophrenic brains function appeared first on PsyPost.
Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp. A new study from the Center [...]The post Yogic breathing shows promise in reducing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder appeared first on PsyPost.
Bully victims more likely to suffer night terrors and nightmares Children who are bullied at ages 8-10 are more likely to suffer from sleep walking, night terrors or nightmares by the time they are 12 years old. In a study published this week in Pediatrics, journal of the American Pediatric Association, Professor Dieter Wolke and Dr Suzet Tanya Lereya from the University of Warwick, found being bullied increases [...]The post Bully victims more likely to suffer night terrors and nightmares appeared first on PsyPost.
Is the pattern of brain folding a ‘fingerprint’ for schizophrenia? Anyone who has seen pictures or models of the human brain is aware that the outside layer, or cortex, of the brain is folded in an intricate pattern of “hills”, called gyri, and “valleys”, called sulci. It turns out that the patterns of cortical folding are largely consistent across healthy humans, broadly speaking. However, disturbances [...]The post Is the pattern of brain folding a ‘fingerprint’ for schizophrenia? appeared first on PsyPost.
Chivalry’s Not Dead It has often been said that chivalry is dead, but new research by The University of Virginia suggests that couples who stick to old-fashioned values often have healthier and longer lasting relationships. It is common for couples to live in de facto relationships, and this can be perceived as a natural and healthy progression in […]
Tipping the balance of behavior: Neurons found that control social behavior may have implications for autism Antagonistic neuron populations in the mouse amygdala that control whether the animal engages in social behaviors or asocial repetitive self-grooming have been recently discovered by researchers. Dubbed a 'seesaw circuit,' this discovery may have implications for understanding neural circuit dysfunctions that underlie autism in humans.
Some male scientists willing to forsake careers for family One third of men in academic science are willing to scale back their careers to focus on family life, according to researchers. While traditional fatherhood roles may be shifting, men in the male-dominated field of academic science, such as physics and biology, face significant challenges in trying to balance work and family life, said Sarah [...]The post Some male scientists willing to forsake careers for family appeared first on PsyPost.
Stop the Violence: Teach Anger Management We are the home of the brave and the land of the free. We are also the land of the violent. Other countries do not understand why Americans are so violent, and neither do we. They say there are 99 guns for every 100 people. But the issue is not...
Study: Meditation may mitigate migraine misery Meditation might be a path to migraine relief, according to a new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. “Stress is a well-known trigger for headaches and research supports the general benefits of mind/body interventions for migraines, but there hasn’t been much research to evaluate specific standardized meditation interventions,” said Rebecca Erwin Wells, [...]The post Study: Meditation may mitigate migraine misery appeared first on PsyPost.
Facebook posts reveal personality traits, but changes complicate interpretation A study from the University of Kansas finds that people can accurately detect the personality traits of strangers through Facebook activity; however, changes to the social media site in the past three years could be making it harder to do so. Researchers sampled 100 Facebook users, paralleling the demographics of the social networking site, and [...]The post Facebook posts reveal personality traits, but changes complicate interpretation appeared first on PsyPost.
Not enough vitamin B1 can cause brain damage A deficiency of a single vitamin, B1 (thiamine), can cause a potentially fatal brain disorder called Wernicke encephalopathy. Symptoms can include confusion, hallucinations, coma, loss of muscle coordination and vision problems such as double vision and involuntary eye movements. Untreated, the condition can lead to irreversible brain damage and death, according to neurologists at Loyola [...]The post Not enough vitamin B1 can cause brain damage appeared first on PsyPost.