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Smoking, schizophrenia linked by alterations in brain nicotine signals Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. A new study sheds light on this hypothesis. The authors found that the level of nicotine receptors in the brain was lower in schizophrenia patients than in a matched healthy group.
Solve Your Relationship Problems Once and for All Does it seem like you have the same fights, over and over?
Best of Our Blogs: September 16, 2014 My greatest heartbreak came after the end of a 11 year relationship. She came into my life at the cusp of my youth just as I was beginning to shed my sheltered teen years and discover my true self. There were moments of spoiled, rotted, rebelliousness during that decade, and...
To curb violent tendencies, start young Aggressive children are less likely to become violent criminals or psychiatrically troubled adults if they receive early intervention, says a new study based on more than two decades of research. These findings from researchers at Duke, Pennsylvania State and Vanderbilt universities and the University of Washington are based on the Fast Track Project, a multi-faceted [...]The post To curb violent tendencies, start young appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: 1 in 5 men reports violence toward intimate partners One in five men in the U.S. reports violence towards their spouse or significant other, says a new nationally-representative study by the University of Michigan. The analysis also found that male aggression toward a partner is associated with warning signs that could come up during routine health care visits, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and [...]The post Study: 1 in 5 men reports violence toward intimate partners appeared first on PsyPost.
Caregivers of family members newly diagnosed with mental illness at risk for anxiety Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing, who studied the emotional distress of caring for a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, found anxiety is high for the primary caregiver at the initial diagnosis or early in the course of the illness and decreases over time. “This finding is significant,” said Jaclene [...]The post Caregivers of family members newly diagnosed with mental illness at risk for anxiety appeared first on PsyPost.
This is your brain on snacks — brain stimulation affects craving and consumption Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in “executive function” affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. After stimulation of [...]The post This is your brain on snacks — brain stimulation affects craving and consumption appeared first on PsyPost.
Delay in age of walking can herald muscular dystrophy in boys with cognitive delays The timing of a toddler’s first steps is an important developmental milestone, but a slight delay in walking is typically not a cause of concern by itself. Now a duo of Johns Hopkins researchers has found that when walking and cognitive delays occur in concert, the combination could comprise the earliest of signals heralding a [...]The post Delay in age of walking can herald muscular dystrophy in boys with cognitive delays appeared first on PsyPost.
Marijuana users who feel low get high Adolescents and young adults who smoke marijuana frequently may attempt to manage negative moods by using the drug, according to a study in September’s Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. “Young people who use marijuana frequently experience an increase in negative affect in the 24 hours leading up to a use event, which lends strong [...]The post Marijuana users who feel low get high appeared first on PsyPost.
Study first to use brain scans to forecast early reading difficulties UC San Francisco researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges. In the United States, children usually learn to read for the first time in kindergarten and become proficient readers by [...]The post Study first to use brain scans to forecast early reading difficulties appeared first on PsyPost.
The most important ingredient for a happy retirement Study reveals the overwhelming key to a satisfying retirement is having your health.
Can looking at food photos make you feel full? Research indicates that looking at images of food might have the effect of making people feel more satisfied.
Study questions Alzheimer's treatments Research shows that more than half of patients with advanced dementia who are in the end stages of Alzheimer’s disease continue to receive drugs that have questionable benefits.
Walking, biking to work seems to have mental health benefits Daily commuters who stopping driving to work and started walking or riding a bike were under less stress and were able to concentrate better.
Researchers urge psychologists to see institutional betrayal Clinical psychologists are being urged by two University of Oregon researchers to recognize the experiences of institutional betrayal so they can better treat their patients and respond in ways that help avoid or repair damaged trust when it occurs in their own institutions. The call to action for clinicians as well as researchers appears in [...]The post Researchers urge psychologists to see institutional betrayal appeared first on PsyPost.
Mindfulness protects adults’ health from the impacts of childhood adversity Adults who were abused or neglected as children are known to have poorer health, but adults who tend to focus on, and accept their reactions to, the present moment—or are mindful—report  having better health, regardless of their childhood adversity. These findings, to be published in the October issue of Preventive Medicine, are based on the first [...]The post Mindfulness protects adults’ health from the impacts of childhood adversity appeared first on PsyPost.
When rulers can’t understand the ruled Johns Hopkins University political scientists wanted to know if America’s unelected officials have enough in common with the people they govern to understand them. The answer: Not really. Surveying 850 people who either work in government or directly with it, researchers found that the inside-the-Beltway crowd has very little in common with America at large. [...]The post When rulers can’t understand the ruled appeared first on PsyPost.
EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain. Understanding how threat is processed in a normal brain versus one altered by PTSD is essential [...]The post EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
How the media covers suicide: Day 1 Covering Suicide and Mental Illness is a three-day seminar for journalists sponsored by The Poynter Institute, The McCormick Specialized Reporting Institute and the Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Here are my thoughts on issues covered during today’s session. #suicidereporting What the DSM is to mental health, the AP Stylebook is...
Brain scans used to forecast early reading difficulties Researchers have used brain scans to predict how young children learn to read, giving clinicians a possible tool to spot children with dyslexia and other reading difficulties before they experience reading challenges.