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Ebola: Coping with Fear and Uncertainty Something very different happens to us when we face an epidemic as opposed to a natural disaster. When a natural disaster hits, there is anxiety, and traumatic loss but such events have a clear beginning and end. Natural disasters are devastating but there are few unknowns. With the collective loss,...
What a panic attack physically feels like Sufferers share how a panic attack manifests itself physically.
Majority of men want flexible work Research is showing that having a measure of control over when, where and how work gets done is something nearly everybody wants, including men.
Walnuts may prevent or slow onset of Alzheimer’s Study found that mice, fed the equivalent for humans of about ounce of walnuts a day, performed better on memory tests.
Coping With A Mental Health Crisis: Using Effective Skills Crisis. What comes to mind when you hear this term? Do you think of natural disasters such as hurricanes, national health concerns like the Ebola virus, personal struggles such as a divorce or failed relationship, or perhaps something less dramatic but still emotionally draining such as failed expectations or loss...
Who is at Fault: It’s a matter of Perspective From time to time, you may have had thought if you did X then a person would react in a predictable, desirable, anticipated way. This reminds me of a client I was seeing. One day she brought flowers from her garden. This client took enormous pride in her prize winning...
Clot dissolver tpa's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery uPA appears to help brain cells recover from the injuries induced by loss of blood flow. Treating mice with uPA after an experimental stroke can improve their recovery of motor function, researchers have found.
When Conflict Gets Dangerous All couples fight. It’s perfectly healthy and normal. Disagreements are a natural part of relationships, and even if you’re deeply in love, some level of conflict is inevitable. In fact, avoiding conflict does more harm than good. Letting anger and resentment build up is a surefire recipe for trouble. However,...
Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections When it comes to the brain, “more is better” seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) recently found that an immune-system protein called [...]The post Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections appeared first on PsyPost.
Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed. Researchers at the University of Bristol, working together with colleagues from the University of Oxford and University College London, collected data from [...]The post Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life appeared first on PsyPost.
Unsteady on your feet? Little touches could make all the difference When a toddler takes their first steps we observe an uncertain sway in their walking. Being unsteady on our feet is something we can experience throughout life – and a new study has shown how even the lightest fingertip touch can help people to maintain their balance. The research, led by the University of Birmingham, [...]The post Unsteady on your feet? Little touches could make all the difference appeared first on PsyPost.
Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs may have an impact on depression Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression. This is shown by the largest ever meta-analysis that has just been published by a research group from Aarhus University in the American scientific journal JAMA Psychiatry. The meta-analysis is based on [...]The post Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs may have an impact on depression appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking A team of UC San Francisco researchers has found that a tiny segment of genetic material known as a microRNA plays a central role in the transition from moderate drinking to binge drinking and other alcohol use disorders. Previous research in the UCSF laboratory of Dorit Ron, PhD, Endowed Chair of Cell Biology of Addiction [...]The post Researchers identify key factor in transition from moderate to problem drinking appeared first on PsyPost.
Even depressed people believe that life gets better Adults typically believe that life gets better — today is better than yesterday was and tomorrow will be even better than today. A new study shows that even depressed individuals believe in a brighter future, but this optimistic belief may not lead to better outcomes. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal [...]The post Even depressed people believe that life gets better appeared first on PsyPost.
Lunch With No Hot Sauce Well, I started taking a new medication for depression. So far, so good, until bam, lunch with no hot sauce. I was at lunch with a new coworker and was trying to put hot sauce on my sandwich and my hands started shaking. Everyone at work knows I’m bipolar which...
Overwhelmed and Stuck With a Stone-Age Brain Prolonged and repetitive exposure to devices changes our behavior and even the way we think. The result is counterproductive interruptions and flitting from one task to another. Attention is like a spotlight: what lies outside it is in our cognitive blind spot.
The consequences of face-ism: Study shows how facial appearances foster biased decisions Research in recent years has shown that people associate specific facial traits with an individual’s personality. For instance, people consistently rate faces that appear more feminine or that naturally appear happy as looking more trustworthy. In addition to trustworthiness, people also consistently associate competence, dominance, and friendliness with specific facial traits. According to an article [...]The post The consequences of face-ism: Study shows how facial appearances foster biased decisions appeared first on PsyPost.
A rich vocabulary can protect against cognitive impairment Some people suffer incipient dementia as they get older. To make up for this loss, the brain’s cognitive reserve is put to the test. Researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela have studied what factors can help to improve this ability and they conclude that having a higher level of vocabulary is one such [...]The post A rich vocabulary can protect against cognitive impairment appeared first on PsyPost.
Animal therapy reduces anxiety, loneliness symptoms in college students Animal-assisted therapy can reduce symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among college students, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Idaho State University and Savannah College of Art and Design. Their findings are published in the latest issue of the Journal of Creativity in Mental Health. The researchers provided animal-assisted therapy to 55 students in a [...]The post Animal therapy reduces anxiety, loneliness symptoms in college students appeared first on PsyPost.
Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol Numerous studies have shown that individuals with an alcohol use disorder perform worse than those without one on multiple neurocognitive domains of function following detoxification from alcohol, although the level of impairment can vary widely among individuals. A new study of the degree of neurocognitive recovery in treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals (ALC) – with varied [...]The post Smoking interferes with neurocognitive recovery during abstinence from alcohol appeared first on PsyPost.