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New antidepressant: Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effects. Within 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.
Design of micro, nanoparticles to improve treatments for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Techniques are being developed to deliver correctly and effectively certain drugs to treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Both disorders affect the neurones: their structure and function is lost, and this in turn leads to the deterioration in the patient's motor, cognitive, sensory and emotional functions.
Some Answers on Media Violence The media tend to report that psychiatrists and other researchers continue to debate whether media violence promotes aggressive behavior in children. In fact, a variety of studies dating back six decades shows that media violence is bad for the developing brain and contributes to our nation’s elevated levels of assault, gang fighting, sexual violence, robbery and murder.
How Vision Works: Why Most of What You See Looks Sharp When Really It’s Not Solving the most fascinating quirk of vision: what you see isn't really what you see. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Brain “Sees” Objects That You Don’t Perceive How Thinking Works: 10 Brilliant Cognitive Psychology Studies Everyone Should Know How Attention Works: The Brain’s Anti-Distraction System Discovered 13 Milliseconds: The Incredible Speed at Which Your Brain Can Identify an Image How the Mind Works: 10 Fascinating TED Talks
Making the Most of Your Hospital Stay   Taken by Ambulance Let’s be frank: to be 5150’d or to check yourself into a mental health hospital is one of the scariest things to do to save your life. But when done, it will make the difference between living and dying.   Let’s also be honest, I’ve never...
Bullying Starts in Families and Spreads Like Cancer Often these days the subject of bullying comes up in the context of prejudice. For example, during the last Presidential election former Presidential candidate Mitt Romney was accused of bullying a fellow student during his youth, a student who was perceived to be different and possibly homosexual. When bullying is...
This Experiment Shows We're Low On Good Samaritans And High On Irony How likely are you to stop and help a stranger? Do you think that would change if the ethos you subscribe to is all about helping others? Here's an experiment that tested that very idea....
Head injury causes immune system to attack brain, new study finds Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells. A new study showed that in experiments on mice, an immune-based treatment reduced the size of brain lesions. The authors suggest that if the findings apply to humans, this could help prevent brain damage from accidents, and protect players of contact sports like football, rugby and boxing.
Fish intake associated with boost to antidepressant response Up to half of patients who suffer from major depression do not respond to treatment with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Now a group of researchers has carried out a study that shows that increasing fatty fish intake appears to increase the response rate in patients who do not respond to antidepressants.
New test to help brain injury victims recover A new assessment can help patients suffering from traumatic brain injury, aneurism, dementia, stroke and more between ages 18-74, experts say. The test is suitable for measuring concentration, memory retention, motor performance, language skills and spatial awareness in patients.
How to Have a Well-Behaved Child, Part 2 In my last post, I presented general principles of good behavior in young children. Today, I would like to follow up with specific recommendations – 15 rules that parents can use to help children learn to behave well (most of the time).
Candidates as Wedding Dresses: Why Does Only This Ad Single women are not evenhanded when it comes to their political preferences. They vote overwhelmingly for Democrats. Republicans have noticed, and in an attempt to attract more of them to the GOP, they created a series of ads. I wonder if they thought long and hard about what kind of...
The Autumn Of An ADHD Life I have no idea if I’m in the autumn of my life, in ways it really feels like I am, but in other ways it still feels like spring for me. It’s truly difficult to reconcile wondering how I’m going to finance retirement in 10 years with wondering what I...
Resources For People With Borderline Personality Disorder This is a space for people with borderline personality disorder who have specific suggestions about how they recovered or what specifically helped them, including sites, blogs, books, and more. Please focus on recovery.
It Helps to Focus on the Positive Stuff Things are OK as they are. That’s the one fact I’ve been struggling with recently. I have this image in my mind as to how I want things to be. I want to make lots of money, I want a house in the mountains, I want to get married. All...
Happy Two Faced: A Common Crime Of Shortsighted Kindness Happy-Two-Faced: a happy-face attitude that ultimately makes one two-faced. For example, your boss reassures you that things will get better as soon as he implements an improvement that he doesn't end up implementing, or a friend who says he'll be there in a few minutes when he knows he'll make you wait more than that. "But I just wanted to make you happy!" he says.
Happy-Two-Faced: A Common Crime of Shortsighted Kindness Happy-Two-Faced: a happy-face attitude that ultimately makes one two-faced. For example, your boss reassures you that things will get better as soon as he implements an improvement that he doesn't end up implementing, or a friend who says he'll be there in a few minutes when he knows he'll make you wait more than that. "But I just wanted to make you happy!" he says.
Researchers find why depression and ageing are linked to increased disease risk Psychological stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders are associated with increased risk for aging-related diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relation are unknown. Understanding these mechanisms may contribute to the development of targeted preventive strategies and new or improved treatments for these devastating diseases. This work is presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology congress [...]The post Researchers find why depression and ageing are linked to increased disease risk appeared first on PsyPost.
A neurotic personality increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease Women who worry, cope poorly with stress and/or experience mood swings in middle age run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease later in life. This is the conclusion of a study carried out at the Sahlgrenska Academy that followed 800 women for nearly 40 years. The study, which will be published in the scientific [...]The post A neurotic personality increases the risk of Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
New information about neurons could lead to advancements in understanding brain disorders Neurons are electrically charged cells, located in the nervous system, that interpret and transmit information using electrical and chemical signals. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that individual neurons can react differently to electrical signals at the molecular level and in different ways—even among neurons of the same type. This variability may [...]The post New information about neurons could lead to advancements in understanding brain disorders appeared first on PsyPost.