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Want to join a networking group? Relationships are a foundation to successful business. One of the common ways to build relationships when you are starting out is through networking, often done in groups. While I say you should first tap into the people you already know and see how you can be of service to them,...
Shhh! Don’t Tell! How and When to Disclose   I’ve disclosed having bipolar disorder in many, many ways: at work, church, on local TV, in articles and here at Bipolar Life hacks. I’ve also studied mental illness and the stigma of disclosure in my doctoral dissertation. What I discovered is eye opening.  ...
Three studies shed new light on the effectiveness of cannabis in epilepsy In advance of the American Epilepsy Society’s (AES) Annual Meeting in December, the organization has offered highlights of groundbreaking research being studied at a number of institutions regarding the effectiveness of cannibidiol (CBD) and its derivatives as a viable treatment for people with epilepsy. The first of three studies (Abstract#1.326) to be presented in full [...]The post Three studies shed new light on the effectiveness of cannabis in epilepsy appeared first on PsyPost.
Recognising emotion in text :-S the business benefits :-) Researchers have advanced the field of affective computing (AC) – the creation of computer systems that recognize, express and process human emotions – by proposing a new way to recognize emotion in text. Their development has significant potential for business applications. In a world full of blog posts, tweets and emails, the implications for businesses [...]The post Recognising emotion in text :-S the business benefits :-) appeared first on PsyPost.
The Power of Kindness The last few months have been hard for me. I’ve had some issues with depression and paranoia. Living with schizophrenia is a rollercoaster and even little blips can turn into crises. This depression, though, has had me feeling a deep sense of loneliness. The paranoia makes me feel ostracized from...
Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new research presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin. Panic disorder is where a person has recurring and regular panic attacks. In the UK, it affects about two in 100 people, and it’s about twice as common in women as it is in men1. Previous [...]The post Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight appeared first on PsyPost.
Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention Indiana is at the forefront of providing mental health screening and services to juvenile offenders, but more efforts are needed to improve the services provided to detained youths, according toIndiana University School of Medicine research findings published in the October issue of the American Journal of Public Health. “A Statewide Collaboration to Initiate Mental Health [...]The post Indiana Project screenings show need for more mental health services in youth detention appeared first on PsyPost.
Exposure therapy appears helpful in treating patients with prolonged grief Cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure therapy (CBT/exposure), where patients relive the experience of a death of a loved one, resulted in greater reductions in measures of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) than CBT alone. PGD involves persistent yearning for the deceased and the associated emotional pain, difficulty in accepting the death, a sense of meaninglessness, bitterness [...]The post Exposure therapy appears helpful in treating patients with prolonged grief appeared first on PsyPost.
Are You Guilty of Low Self-Esteem Workarounds? Those of us who struggle with low self-esteem might not like ourselves very much. But, because we’re alive, we like other people and other stuff. As scathingly as we might view our reflections in mirrors or our performance at work, a few things out there in the world still bring...
Is Your Pleasure Principle All Jacked Up? The pleasure principle suggests that people seek pleasure and avoid pain. It’s the theoretical motivation behind human behavior. 

It makes perfect sense. Or does it? Why do people make choices, then, that lead to pain? For example, a woman has been dating a guy who has shown all the red...
Questions to Ask Ourselves for Practicing Self-Care This morning I was reading Mara’s newsletter (I highly recommend subscribing, which you can do here). In it, she mentions the simple question we can ask ourselves when practicing self-care: What do I need? It’s a question we ask every day, several times a day. I love this because sometimes...
Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Columbia University in New York. The work, reported on October 22 in the journal Neuron, culminates [...]The post Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning appeared first on PsyPost.
Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington’s disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, [...]The post Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells appeared first on PsyPost.
WATCH: Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain For the first time, a team of interdisciplinary researchers have made recordings of neurons associated with visual perception inside the poppy seed-sized brain of a jumping spider (Phidippus audax). Though neurobiologists have tried for half a century to better understand the brains of jumping spiders, no one has succeeded. The liquid in spiders’ bodies is [...]The post WATCH: Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Study finds link between air toxics and childhood autism Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers’ pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children [...]The post Study finds link between air toxics and childhood autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness. Scientists used a new super-resolution imaging method — the same method recognized with the 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry — to peer deep into brain tissue [...]The post Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level appeared first on PsyPost.
Susceptibility for relapsing major depressive disorder can be calculated Selver Demic and his colleagues from the Mercator Research Group have set out to find out more about the causes of depression. “Approx. 20 per cent of the population will suffer a de-pressive episode in the course of their lives,” says Demic. “This cohort of 20 per cent includes people who will never again experience [...]The post Susceptibility for relapsing major depressive disorder can be calculated appeared first on PsyPost.
Genes exhibit different behaviours in different stages of brain development The effect that genes have on our brain depends on our age. These are the findings of a group of researchers from the MedUni Vienna. It has been known for a number of years that particular genetic variations are of importance for the functioning of neural circuits in the brain. Just how these effects differ [...]The post Genes exhibit different behaviours in different stages of brain development appeared first on PsyPost.
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development. “These findings are important because [...]The post Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy appeared first on PsyPost.
If you’re over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory — the ability to recall memories of events. Moderate alcohol consumption was also linked [...]The post If you’re over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory appeared first on PsyPost.