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Finding the Source of Your Fears Knowing what is causing your fear and anxiety can go a long way toward finding the solution. Below are some suggestions. 1. Self-evaluation. A person can find the source of his or her own fears by doing some self-evaluation and also by talking to a professional. Asking yourself questions such as:...
Five Ways to Become More Curious Curiosity can help us create meaning, discover our passions, help us learn and even boost performance.
Politics can interact with evolution to shape human destiny Politics can have unintentional evolutionary consequences that may cause hastily issued policies to cascade into global, multigenerational problems, according to political scientists. “Most western democracies look at policies as if they are bandages, we fix what we can and then move on,” said Pete Hatemi, associate professor of political science, Penn State. “But we need [...]The post Politics can interact with evolution to shape human destiny appeared first on PsyPost.
Do financial experts make better investments? Study has surprising results Financial experts do not make higher returns on their own investments than untrained investors, according to research by a Michigan State University business scholar. The first-of-its-kind study analyzed the private portfolios of mutual fund managers and found the managers were surprisingly unsuccessful at outperforming nonprofessional investors. The findings suggest average investors might be better served [...]The post Do financial experts make better investments? Study has surprising results appeared first on PsyPost.
Why early diagnosis of autism in children is a good thing Many children with autism are put on waiting lists and miss out on early behavioural interventions and other benefits because health professionals are reluctant to diagnose autism early out of fear of labelling young children. Until recently “autism is a lifelong developmental disability” was repeated in nearly all descriptions and definitions of autism, even to [...]The post Why early diagnosis of autism in children is a good thing appeared first on PsyPost.
Antidepressants may be no better than a placebo, so why take them? Seventeenth-century Oxford scholar Robert Burton’s lifework, The Anatomy of Melancholy, weighs in at a door-stopping 1,400 pages. But his cure for the “Black Choler” of depression came down to just six words: “Be not solitary, be not idle.” Writing today, he might add: “And maybe take a placebo.” Placebos are sham treatments that work even [...]The post Antidepressants may be no better than a placebo, so why take them? appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Warning Signs You May Be Taking On Too Much “No one can get inner peace by pouncing on it.” – Harry Emerson Fosdick Do you ever feel like you have too much to do and too little time to do it? This is a common way of life for many people, but it can lead to some serious problems...
Playing violent video games in 3D increases feelings of anger Science fiction author William Gibson said: “virtual reality is like mainlining television.” Virtual reality is no longer limited to the wealthy few who can afford it. It is also becoming more common in many forms of media, including video games. Although virtual reality video games have provided stereoscopic 3D game experiences for years, the recent [...]The post Playing violent video games in 3D increases feelings of anger appeared first on PsyPost.
Sorry, but eating chocolate will not improve your memory This morning I woke to the most disappointing headline ever. “A Bite to Remember? Chocolate Is Shown to Aid Memory” was prominent in my twitter feed, highlighting a recent paper in Nature Neuroscience. Excited, I quickly read the article only to have my hopes dashed, the headline was flat out wrong. Other news sites were [...]The post Sorry, but eating chocolate will not improve your memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Is Facebook Messing With Your Mojo? We all do it. We post, like, share and visit Facebook. And so, we are all exposed. That is, according to a recent study that measured the impact of the posts we read on our mood. The Facebook experiment took place for one week in January, 2012, and manipulated the...
Pair bonding reinforced in the brain: Zebra finches use their specialized song system for simple communication In addition to their song, songbirds also have an extensive repertoire of calls. While the species-specific song must be learned as a young bird, most calls are, as in the case of all other birds, innate. Researchers have now discovered that in zebra finches the song control system in the brain is also active during simple communication calls. This relationship between unlearned calls and an area of the brain responsible for learned vocalizations is important for understanding the evolution of song learning in songbirds.
Why You Think You Know Things That You Really Don't At first blush, it would seem that not knowing something would make us correspondingly uncertain. Instead, however, it sometimes has the opposite effect, with people not only professing to know something, but even making up an explanation and holding fast. Here's why — and how — that works....
There's A Lot More To Violent Behavior Than Just Two Mutated Genes A new genetic study linking two genes to extreme violent behavior is raising serious questions as to what makes a criminal and whether or not these genes could be used to screen — or even let off — potential offenders....
Stay Here Where Life Can't Kill You Revisiting a place beloved in childhood then nearly forgotten, I start to believe that I left some unseen part of myself there that has been awaiting my return.
The 7 Ways People End Relationships and Which Works Best Everyone can relate to relationship break-up strategies that failed miserably. The key to minimizing the pain is to adjust the strategy to your personality and that of your partner. It may even be possible for you to improve your relationship breakup strategy with a simple mental adjustment.
ADHD and Women: When Your Senses Are Extra Sensitive Psychotherapist Terry Matlen thought she was losing her hearing. Every time she’d talk on the phone, she couldn’t hear what the other person was saying if other sounds were present. Even a quiet TV and a loved one talking hampered her hearing. But when she went to get tested, she...
How To Get Public Opinion On Your Side A study in the 1970s shows that people in groups tend to make riskier decisions and take more extreme views than they would alone. Here's how to defuse that group dynamic when it's not on your side....
The Secret World of Schizophrenia The treatment for schizophrenia and manic-depression have shockingly deteriorated throughout my professional lifetime, dating back to 1971. During the hopeful period of deinstitutionalization, it seemed like we were turning the corner. Finally, an enlightened age, finally. It didn’t happen.
Self-reported sleep disturbances linked to higher risk for Alzheimer's disease in men Elderly men with self-reported sleep disturbances run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men without self-reported sleep disturbances, studies show. The researchers followed more than 1,000 men, who were initially 50 year old, between the years 1970 and 2010. The results of the study show that self-reported sleep disturbances were linked to an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease during the 40-year follow-up period, particularly if they occurred late in life.
Does having children make us any happier? The birth of a first and a second child briefly increases the level of their parents’ happiness, but a third does not, according to new research. Those who have children at an older age or who are more educated have a particularly positive response to a first birth. Older parents, between the ages of 35 -- 49, have the strongest happiness gains around the time of birth and stay at a higher level of happiness after becoming parents, the research indicates.