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Become More of Who You Are (And Other Lead Positive Tips) Find out from brand expert Sally Hogshead how “becoming more of who you are” can spur your career to new heights.
#119 Who is Mother? Who is Mother? Is mother a  woman who is working in the rice fields,  wearing her baby in a sling and wondering how she will feed herself, let alone her child? Is she a single woman with four kids, working two jobs while the 11-year-old babysits? Is she the CEO...
3 Ways to Tell If Your Significant Other is Myths and misunderstandings that block lasting love. “Cheers to the perfect couple!” Heart-felt words like these can actually doom a relationship. Did you know that your well-meaning congratulations to a new couple could solidify dangerous myths about love? Beliefs about relationships were the focus of a recent study conducted by...
Worry, jealousy, moodiness linked to higher risk of Alzheimer's in women Women who are anxious, jealous, or moody and distressed in middle age may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life, according to a nearly 40-year-long study.
Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find Relational aggression, or “mean girl” bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. As media coverage has illustrated, relational aggression can lead to tragic and sometimes fatal outcomes. Despite these alarming concerns, little has been done [...]The post Intervention helps decrease ‘mean girl’ behaviors, researchers find appeared first on PsyPost.
Worry, jealousy, moodiness linked to higher risk of Alzheimer’s in women Women who are anxious, jealous, or moody and distressed in middle age may be at a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life, according to a nearly 40-year-long study published in the October 1, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “Most Alzheimer’s research has been [...]The post Worry, jealousy, moodiness linked to higher risk of Alzheimer’s in women appeared first on PsyPost.
Treatment of substance abuse can lessen risk of future violence in mentally ill If a person is dually diagnosed with a severe mental illness and a substance abuse problem, are improvements in their mental health or in their substance abuse most likely to reduce the risk of future violence? Although some may believe that improving symptoms of mental illness is more likely to lessen the risk for future [...]The post Treatment of substance abuse can lessen risk of future violence in mentally ill appeared first on PsyPost.
Keeping your eyes on the prize can help with exercise, NYU study finds New research suggests the adage that encourages people to keep their “eyes on the prize” may be on target when it comes to exercise. When walking, staying focused on a specific target ahead can make the distance to it appear shorter and help people walk there faster, psychology researchers have found. Their study, which compares [...]The post Keeping your eyes on the prize can help with exercise, NYU study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Power can corrupt even the honest, study finds When appointing a new leader, selectors base their choice on several factors and typically look for leaders with desirable characteristics such as honesty and trustworthiness. However once leaders are in power, can we trust them to exercise it in a prosocial manner? New research published in The Leadership Quarterly looked to discover whether power corrupts [...]The post Power can corrupt even the honest, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Researchers show EEG’s potential to reveal depolarizations following traumatic brain injury The potential for doctors to measure damaging “brain tsunamis” in injured patients without opening the skull has moved a step closer to reality, thanks to pioneering research at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Neuroscience Institute. The research team, led by Jed Hartings, PhD, research associate professor in the department of neurosurgery at the UC College [...]The post Researchers show EEG’s potential to reveal depolarizations following traumatic brain injury appeared first on PsyPost.
Laying siege to beta-amyloid, the key protein in Alzheimer’s disease The peptide —a small protein— beta-amyloid is strongly associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, researchers are still looking for unequivocal proof that this peptide is the causal agent of the onset and development of the disease. The main obstacle impeding such confirmation is that beta-amyloid is not harmful when found in isolation but only when it [...]The post Laying siege to beta-amyloid, the key protein in Alzheimer’s disease appeared first on PsyPost.
Predicting the future course of psychotic illness Psychiatry researchers from the University of Adelaide have developed a model that could help to predict a patient’s likelihood of a good outcome from treatment – from their very first psychotic episode. The model is based on a range of factors, including clinical symptoms, cognitive abilities, MRI scans of the brain’s structure, and biomarkers in [...]The post Predicting the future course of psychotic illness appeared first on PsyPost.
Public feels more negative toward drug addicts than mentally ill People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those suffering from drug addiction than those with mental illness, and don’t support insurance, housing, and employment policies that benefit those dependent on drugs, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. A report on the findings, which appears in the October issue [...]The post Public feels more negative toward drug addicts than mentally ill appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: Lift weights, improve your memory Here’s another reason why it’s a good idea to hit the gym: it can improve memory. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study shows that an intense workout of as little as 20 minutes can enhance episodic memory, also known as long-term memory for previous events, by about 10 percent in healthy young adults. The [...]The post Study: Lift weights, improve your memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Know Thyself: How the past can help, or hinder, the present How might unresolved issues in our past affect our present -- and our future?
Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death: Olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of mortality The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.
Emotional Intelligence Is Overrated There's another ability that has a bigger influence on our success at work.
A Grief Hygiene “The cup is already broken,” they say in Zen lore. Yes, we know: we get dogs knowing that we will most likely outlive them. We’ve learned to look at our fragile tech gizmos with that acquired acceptance of “it’s built-in obsolescence.” Impermanence is all around us: Heraclitus knew it, Buddha...
7 Ways to Deal with Family and Friends Who If “I believe you” are the three most powerful words you can say to someone with an invisible illness. Four of the hardest or most painful words to absorb — whether they are said directly or communicated indirectly through insensitive behavior — are “I don’t believe you.” And yet, people...
Eight Step Method to Manage Intense Emotion Recently I received this request from a reader: What I have found lacking is books or articles on the process of revealing my feelings, the associated pain and some kind of plan to work through the feelings that would help DURING the healing process. Knowing the common steps of healing...