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Divide And Conquer ADHD Overwhelmishness What is being overwhelmed for someone with ADHD? For us, being overwhelmed can be a sensation that spans the spectrum from annoyance to paralysis. It is the feeling that the task or situation in front of us is beyond our ability to cope with. And it is the thing that...
The Science of Smiling Can there really be a science of smiling. Using the research of cross-cultural, evolutionary and social psychology researchers have built up a surprising amount of interesting information about the smile
9 Ways to Stop Procrastinating on Your Screenplay Now According to writer-therapist Dennis Palumbo, a friend, Facebook friend and personal mentor,  procrastination is ultimately about a fear of being judged. He tells his clients (writers, tv writers, and novelists)that instead of obsessing about it, they should write about it, as a dialogue with themselves, or as if they were writing...
Jian Ghomeshi -His Antics -And Me Canadians have been rocked by a sex scandal this week. Beloved radio and tv host/journalist Jian Ghomeshi was fired by the CBC because of his sexual antics. Faced with being outed by an ex-girlfriend regarding his sexual preferences (BDSM) he decided to take a leave of absence from his show...
Link seen in brain between seizures, migraines Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena.
Link seen between seizures and migraines in the brain Seizures and migraines have always been considered separate physiological events in the brain, but now a team of engineers and neuroscientists looking at the brain from a physics viewpoint discovered a link between these and related phenomena. Scientists believed these two brain events were separate phenomena because they outwardly affect people very differently. Seizures are [...]The post Link seen between seizures and migraines in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Together we are strong – or insufferable How do we as individuals prompt our fellow humans to behave socially? This is one of the central questions relating to social dilemmas in game theory. Previous studies assumed that it is almost impossible to control cooperation in large groups. Nonetheless, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology have now demonstrated that each [...]The post Together we are strong – or insufferable appeared first on PsyPost.
Sadness lasts longer than other emotions Why is it that you can feel sad up to 240 times longer than you do feeling ashamed, surprised, irritated or even bored? It’s because sadness often goes hand in hand with events of greater impact such as death or accidents. You need more time to mull over and cope with what happened to fully [...]The post Sadness lasts longer than other emotions appeared first on PsyPost.
Can parents make their kids smarter? Probably not, study suggests Reading bedtime stories, engaging in conversation and eating nightly dinners together are all positive ways in which parents interact with their children, but according to new research, none of these actions have any detectable influence on children’s intelligence later in life. Florida State University criminology professor Kevin Beaver examined a nationally representative sample of youth [...]The post Can parents make their kids smarter? Probably not, study suggests appeared first on PsyPost.
Strong bonds with pets may help foster resiliency in military-connected children Developing resiliency has important benefits for children, especially those from military families faced with significant challenges such as parental deployment and frequent moves. New research published online in Applied Developmental Science supports the idea that, along with other key resources, strong attachments to animals may help military-connected children develop resiliency and other positive developmental traits. [...]The post Strong bonds with pets may help foster resiliency in military-connected children appeared first on PsyPost.
Social psychology has lost its balance The New Yorker has an interesting article about a lack of political diversity in social psychology and how that may be leading to a climate of bias against conservative researchers, ideas and the evidence that might support them. Some of the evidence for a bias against conservative thinking in social psychology goes back some years, […]
5 Tips for Changing Negative Self Beliefs “Wisdom is nothing more than healed pain.” - Robert Gary Lee A year ago, I began to accept that I was depressed, and had been for a long time. It was scary. I broke up with my live-in boyfriend of almost three years, quit my job, and though I didn’t...
Halloween: Sexy Costumes & Who’s Behind The Mask Halloween is just around the corner and women can get a lot of grief for selecting costumes that are considered sexy, however, a costume can tell you a lot about a person. Those of us that are attending Halloween parties this year have the opportunity to mingle and meet new...
Understanding Anxiety We all feel anxious at different times in our lives. Whether we are stressed about bills, relationships or work, it is a physical and mental sensation we all must work through. For many of us, anxiety can be far more than a momentary feeling, and we live with an anxiety disorder which causes unnecessary and […]
When You Think You’re Not Enough Ever feel like your worth is determined by your output?  That you gotta earn your way to respect with blood, sweat and tears?  This is a message that we get a lot.  Conversation circles at parties can feel like a competition called “Who’s the most overcommitted person here?” I usually feel...
Toddlers copy their peers to fit in, but apes don’t From the playground to the board room, people often follow, or conform, to the behavior of those around them as a way of fitting in. New research shows that this behavioral conformity appears early in human children, but isn’t evidenced by apes like chimpanzees and orangutans. “Conformity is a very basic feature of human sociality. [...]The post Toddlers copy their peers to fit in, but apes don’t appeared first on PsyPost.
Aging brains aren’t necessarily declining brains For years, conventional wisdom held that growing older tends to be bad news for brains. Past behavioral data largely pointed to loss in cognitive – that is, thinking – abilities with age, including poorer memory and greater distractibility. Physical measures of brain structure also showed atrophy, or loss of volume, in many regions with age. [...]The post Aging brains aren’t necessarily declining brains appeared first on PsyPost.
Novel tinnitus therapy helps patients cope with phantom noise Patients with tinnitus hear phantom noise and are sometimes so bothered by the perceived ringing in their ears, they have difficulty concentrating. A new therapy does not lessen perception of the noise but appears to help patients cope better with it in their daily lives, according to new research.
For stroke patients, hospital bed position is delicate balancing act During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail -- such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. Most strokes are caused by blood clots that block blood flow to the brain. Sitting upright can harm the patient because it decreases blood flow and oxygen to the brain just when the brain needs more blood.
5 Ways to Stop Yourself from Eating When You’re The fridge door is open and you’re peering inside, feeling bored, lonely or sad. But you’re not actually hungry. You know that eating what’s in front of you isn’t the answer. You know you’re just going to feel awful, if you do. But what are some things you can think,...