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How suicide prevention app alerts you to signs of distress on Twitter For more or less any topic we can think of, social media has great potential for both good and harm. One example is suicidal distress. It is increasingly common for people to express despairing and suicidal thoughts on social media sites. On the one hand this is to be welcomed, as more public expression of [...]The post How suicide prevention app alerts you to signs of distress on Twitter appeared first on PsyPost.
Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics Bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract fulfill many vital functions and are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria can induce strong inflammatory responses by the immune system if they penetrate the gut and enter the bloodstream. Although acute inflammation is a natural response to protect the body, chronic or systemic inflammation is linked to numerous [...]The post Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics appeared first on PsyPost.
Scientists examine the evolution of competitiveness Virtually all organisms in the living world compete with members of their own species. However, individuals differ strongly in how much they invest into their competitive ability. Some individuals are highly competitive and eager to get access to high-quality resources, while others seem to avoid competition, instead making prudent use of the lower-quality resources that [...]The post Scientists examine the evolution of competitiveness appeared first on PsyPost.
The psychology of accents The surprising effects behind our accents.The post The psychology of accents appeared first on PsyPost.
5 Things You Should Never Say At Work!   Finding a good job is difficult. Keeping that job can be even harder. Let’s be honest – today’s workplace is a money focused, deadline driven, productivity magnified ball of stress. Throw in constant change and a dash of uncertainty and it’s enough to grind down even the hardiest of...
Four Characteristics of Soul-Fulfilling Relationships                     There are many ways of connecting with people. An emotionally safe, equal, and emotionally intimate relationship is likely the scariest and most challenging relationship to build, yet is also the  most likely to decrease your sense of loneliness and help...
The National Alliance on Mental Illness 2014 Conference The 2014 National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Convention in Washington, D.C. in September was, by any measure, a huge success. Mingling with consumers, family members, mental health advocates, and a wide range of mental health providers, I couldn’t help but be swept up in the atmosphere of expectation that...
This Year’s Top 5 After Trauma Posts This week is the one year anniversary of After Trauma. When I started writing, I knew that I knew some stuff about trauma and I knew that I didn’t know a lot of things about trauma but I had no idea how much there was to learn! Sometimes it feels like I’ve...
The Boldest New Idea about Sex Just when you thought that there could never be another big new idea about sex, there is one, and it is way different from just about everything else out there. For years, it has been possible to find all sorts of advice and information about how to have more sex...
Lou Gehrig’s disease study: Renewing brain’s aging support cells may help neurons survive Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, attacks muscle-controlling nerve cells – motor neurons – in the brain, brainstem and spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and eventual paralysis of muscles throughout the body. Patients typically survive only three to five years after diagnosis. Now, with publication of a study by [...]The post Lou Gehrig’s disease study: Renewing brain’s aging support cells may help neurons survive appeared first on PsyPost.
The psychology behind the leap of faith: Reminders of God increase risk taking, even among atheists New research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science has found that being exposed to the word God can increase risk-taking behaviors in some situations, even among those who don’t believe in the divine creator. “Religion has great impact on humanity,” Kai Qin Chan, Eddie Mun Wai Tong, and Yan Lin Tan wrote [...]The post The psychology behind the leap of faith: Reminders of God increase risk taking, even among atheists appeared first on PsyPost.
Women and Wine: Should They Worry? In a recent article by Eric Asimov, wine reviewer for the New York Times, he discusses how wine is used as a character prop on TV shows and may reflect a changing cultural perception of wine. In this article, Asimov points out that “ On TV Powerful Women Gulp Red”...
New study casts sharpest light yet on genetic mysteries of autism Our picture of how genetic errors contribute to autism has just gotten sharper. The latest series of clarifications in what, in its totality, is a very complex puzzle, emerges from new research published in Nature today by a team co-led by investigators at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL), Yale University, the University of California, San [...]The post New study casts sharpest light yet on genetic mysteries of autism appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain responses to disgusting images help reveal political leanings Maggot infestations, rotting carcasses, unidentifiable gunk in the kitchen sink – how much your brain responds to disgusting images could predict whether you are liberal or conservative. In a study to be published in an upcoming issue of Current Biology, an international team of scientists led by Virginia Tech reports that the strength of a [...]The post Brain responses to disgusting images help reveal political leanings appeared first on PsyPost.
Tweeting much to gain popularity is an inefficient strategy, study finds The imbalanced structure of Twitter, where some users have many followers and the large majority barely has several dozen followers, means that messages from the more influential have much more impact. Less popular users can compensate for this by increasing their activity and their tweets, but the outcome is costly and inefficient. This was confirmed [...]The post Tweeting much to gain popularity is an inefficient strategy, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Anti-social behaviour a consequence, rather than a cause of homelessness Anti-social behaviours such as drug and alcohol abuse are often the consequence, rather than the cause of homelessness, according to a series of studies from Northumbria University presented at the Economic and Social Research Council’s 2014 Festival of Social Science. The studies suggest that contrary to common belief, unexpected life events could lead to anyone [...]The post Anti-social behaviour a consequence, rather than a cause of homelessness appeared first on PsyPost.
How do we punish norm violators? An international team of researchers including Loukas Balafoutas (University of Innsbruck), Nikos Nikiforakis (NYU Abu Dhabi) and Bettina Rockenbach (University of Cologne) has conducted pioneering research on the question of how people punish strangers for norm violating behavior. In their article on direct and indirect punishment, which appeared in the journal Proceedings of the National [...]The post How do we punish norm violators? appeared first on PsyPost.
Who dumped me? A profile emerges of Facebook ‘unfrienders’ during Israel-Gaza conflict New research conducted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem paints a picture of the Jewish Israelis who cut ties with their Facebook friends during the recent Israel-Gaza conflict. Dubbed “Operation Protective Edge” in Israel, the fighting began in early July 2014 and lasted about seven weeks. With the Internet serving as an important forum for [...]The post Who dumped me? A profile emerges of Facebook ‘unfrienders’ during Israel-Gaza conflict appeared first on PsyPost.
What’s the Meaning of Your Life? In his classic bestseller, “Man’s Search for Meaning,” psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl explains that among the first things that he had to do once he arrived at Auschwitz was to surrender his clothes. This is humbling in itself, of course. But this was extraordinarily painful for Frankl, because...
The Type of Exercise That Most Benefits Memory, Reasoning and Mental Flexibility Study compared the mental effects of aerobic exercise, weight training and balance and co-ordination. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:The Quick Exercise That Immediately Improves Long-Term Memory Power Up: The Performance Benefits of a Simple Mental Exercise Get Motivated to Exercise: Here’s a Simple Mental Trick You Can Do Right Now Mindfulness: 6 Steps to Better Memory, Verbal Reasoning and Improved Concentration Painless Brain Stimulation Improves Mental Arithmetic in Five Days