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MRI technique detects evidence of cognitive decline before symptoms appear A magnetic resonance imaging technique can detect signs of cognitive decline in the brain even before symptoms appear, according to a new study. The technique has the potential to serve as a biomarker in very early diagnosis of preclinical dementia.
Adolescents with cerebral palsy report similar quality of life to their able-bodied peers Adolescents with cerebral palsy face multiple challenges, but they rate their quality of life (QoL) on a par with their able-bodied peers, according to new research reporting on how adolescents with cerebral palsy from nine European regions feel about life.
Academic Achievement: You Inherit More Than Just Intelligence From Your Parents Why the heritability of educational achievement is about much more than just intelligence.
Best of Our Blogs: October 7, 2014 Wish you had more time in the day to do everything? It may not be your time that needs managing, but your energy. We’re all buzzing around doing and accomplishing. In fact, sharing all the things you have to do is accepted, validated and even envied by others. The desire to...
Therapist Roll Call: Join The Private Practice Pinterest List Do you use Pinterest? I do and I have found some amazing relationship and emotional health resources for my clients and practice building resources. In the past, I’ve featured a roll call for therapists so we could connect on Twitter and Facebook, and it was very well received. I’d like...
25 Affirmations for Confidence We Should Say Each Day!   Have you ever looked in the mirror and played an ugly mental narrative? You know – that negative tape that imparts nasty messages about yourself and says things like: “You look terrible!” OR “You look fat!” OR “God … you look old!” Sound familiar?  Mirror Work If so, I...
IT’S NOT A SIN TO BE SICK It’s not a sin to be sick     Let’s just put it out there right now. I’m a Christian. There. I said it. No, I’m not one of those “holier than thou” and everyone-needs-to-do-as-I-do types. We all know them. Maybe you’ve even been one. Until the day you received...
Are You A Narcissist? Or Are You The Opposite? Are You A Narcissist? Or A Detrimental Caretaker? I recently published several columns about narcissism and relationships. These blog posts received a flurry of reader responses: Some people felt they were dealing with a narcissist, and some deemed themselves narcissists. If you’re just now tuning in, this is a good time for the visual spectrum...
Women in business negotiations face more deceit than men, according to new research Women in business negotiations face more deceit than men, according to new research. In a study to be published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, researchers found that women are usually at a disadvantage during negotiations. “We found that men and women alike were targeting women with more deception than men,” said Jessica Kennedy, [...]The post Women in business negotiations face more deceit than men, according to new research appeared first on PsyPost.
Preschoolers with low empathy at risk for continued problems A toddler who doesn’t feel guilty after misbehaving or who is less affectionate or less responsive to affection from others might not raise a red flag to parents, but these behaviors may result in later behavior problems in 1st grade. The findings come from a new University of Michigan study that identifies different types of [...]The post Preschoolers with low empathy at risk for continued problems appeared first on PsyPost.
Beware the Dangers of FOMO I’ve known my friend David (not his real name) for over twenty years and we’ve always gotten along well. That’s probably, at least in part due to the fact that we share a lot of common interests and values. Lately though, David has developed a habit that has been driving...
Researchers redefine hypothesis on holes in the brain Researchers at University of Copenhagen have studied access conditions at brain cell level. New study explodes existing paradigm that huge channels uncritically perforate cell membranes. Over the years, researchers have described how some of the body’s cells have giant channels – a kind of holes that completely uncritically allow both small and large molecules to [...]The post Researchers redefine hypothesis on holes in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Questioners, What Questions Do You Ask about Your Habits? I posted recently about “Are you a people-pleaser?”  This question is related to the Four Tendencies framework, which I develop in Better Than Before, my book on habit change. A key piece of self-knowledge — which is crucial to habit change — is “What is your ‘Tendency?”  That is: How do you respond to expectations? Outer...
Mother’s behavior has strong effect on cocaine-exposed children It is not only prenatal drug exposure, but also conditions related to drug use that can influence negative behavior in children, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions. In examining the long-term effects of cocaine use during pregnancy in a sample of low-income, cocaine-exposed and non-exposed families, researchers [...]The post Mother’s behavior has strong effect on cocaine-exposed children appeared first on PsyPost.
Teen hormones and cellphones: Sexting leads to increased sexual behavior among teens Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston say that sexting may be the new “normal” part of adolescent sexual development and is not strictly limited to at-risk teens. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, are from the first study on the relationship between teenage sexting, or sending sexually explicit images to [...]The post Teen hormones and cellphones: Sexting leads to increased sexual behavior among teens appeared first on PsyPost.
There’s no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds G-spot, vaginal, or clitoral orgasms are all incorrect terms, experts say. In a recent Clinical Anatomy review, they argue that like ‘male orgasm’, ‘female orgasm’ is the correct term. The authors note that the majority of women worldwide do not have orgasms during intercourse: as a matter of fact, female sexual dysfunctions are popular because [...]The post There’s no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops Hardly a day passes without pundits crying for leadership in the NFL commissioner and team owners, among high-ranking government officials, and in other public figures. If University of Illinois experts didn’t have evidence that this valuable trait can be taught, they might join the collective swoon that’s engulfing much of the country. But a new [...]The post Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops appeared first on PsyPost.
Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar voice only helps children to process and understand words they already know well, not new words that aren’t in their vocabularies. The findings, which [...]The post Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers appeared first on PsyPost.
How rabies ‘hijacks’ neurons to attack the brain Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body’s internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus [...]The post How rabies ‘hijacks’ neurons to attack the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: ​‘Broad consensus’ that violent media increase child aggression Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study. The study found that 66 percent of researchers, 67 percent of parents and 90 percent of pediatricians agree or strongly agree that violent video games can increase aggressive behavior among children. [...]The post Study: ​‘Broad consensus’ that violent media increase child aggression appeared first on PsyPost.