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Beware the Dangers of FOMO I’ve known my friend David (not his real name) for over twenty years and we’ve always gotten along well. That’s probably, at least in part due to the fact that we share a lot of common interests and values. Lately though, David has developed a habit that has been driving...
Researchers redefine hypothesis on holes in the brain Researchers at University of Copenhagen have studied access conditions at brain cell level. New study explodes existing paradigm that huge channels uncritically perforate cell membranes. Over the years, researchers have described how some of the body’s cells have giant channels – a kind of holes that completely uncritically allow both small and large molecules to [...]The post Researchers redefine hypothesis on holes in the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Questioners, What Questions Do You Ask about Your Habits? I posted recently about “Are you a people-pleaser?”  This question is related to the Four Tendencies framework, which I develop in Better Than Before, my book on habit change. A key piece of self-knowledge — which is crucial to habit change — is “What is your ‘Tendency?”  That is: How do you respond to expectations? Outer...
Mother’s behavior has strong effect on cocaine-exposed children It is not only prenatal drug exposure, but also conditions related to drug use that can influence negative behavior in children, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions. In examining the long-term effects of cocaine use during pregnancy in a sample of low-income, cocaine-exposed and non-exposed families, researchers [...]The post Mother’s behavior has strong effect on cocaine-exposed children appeared first on PsyPost.
Teen hormones and cellphones: Sexting leads to increased sexual behavior among teens Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston say that sexting may be the new “normal” part of adolescent sexual development and is not strictly limited to at-risk teens. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, are from the first study on the relationship between teenage sexting, or sending sexually explicit images to [...]The post Teen hormones and cellphones: Sexting leads to increased sexual behavior among teens appeared first on PsyPost.
There’s no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds G-spot, vaginal, or clitoral orgasms are all incorrect terms, experts say. In a recent Clinical Anatomy review, they argue that like ‘male orgasm’, ‘female orgasm’ is the correct term. The authors note that the majority of women worldwide do not have orgasms during intercourse: as a matter of fact, female sexual dysfunctions are popular because [...]The post There’s no such thing as a vaginal orgasm, review finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops Hardly a day passes without pundits crying for leadership in the NFL commissioner and team owners, among high-ranking government officials, and in other public figures. If University of Illinois experts didn’t have evidence that this valuable trait can be taught, they might join the collective swoon that’s engulfing much of the country. But a new [...]The post Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops appeared first on PsyPost.
Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar voice only helps children to process and understand words they already know well, not new words that aren’t in their vocabularies. The findings, which [...]The post Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers appeared first on PsyPost.
How rabies ‘hijacks’ neurons to attack the brain Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body’s internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. For the first time, Tel Aviv University scientists have discovered the exact mechanism this killer virus [...]The post How rabies ‘hijacks’ neurons to attack the brain appeared first on PsyPost.
Study: ​‘Broad consensus’ that violent media increase child aggression Majorities of media researchers, parents and pediatricians agree that exposure to violent media can increase aggression in children, according to a new national study. The study found that 66 percent of researchers, 67 percent of parents and 90 percent of pediatricians agree or strongly agree that violent video games can increase aggressive behavior among children. [...]The post Study: ​‘Broad consensus’ that violent media increase child aggression appeared first on PsyPost.
Caving to cravings? Indulging in junk food linked to lapses in brain function Overindulging in high-calorie snacks is partly caused by lapses in a very specific part of the brain, according to a new University of Waterloo study. The study, published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, is the first to conclusively link reduced operation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with self-restraint in the dietary context. “It [...]The post Caving to cravings? Indulging in junk food linked to lapses in brain function appeared first on PsyPost.
Human sense of fairness evolved to favor long-term cooperation The human response to unfairness evolved in order to support long-term cooperation, according to a research team from Georgia State University and Emory University. Fairness is a social ideal that cannot be measured, so to understand the evolution of fairness in humans, Dr. Sarah Brosnan of Georgia State’s departments of Psychology and Philosophy, the Neuroscience [...]The post Human sense of fairness evolved to favor long-term cooperation appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows overweight and obese mothers and children fail to recognize abnormal weight Size is relative, especially to people who tend to be on the heavy side. Researchers at the Columbia University Medical Center in the US found that seven in every ten obese adults underestimate how much someone weighs. People of normal weight make this mistake much less often. Mothers of overweight or obese children also tend [...]The post Study shows overweight and obese mothers and children fail to recognize abnormal weight appeared first on PsyPost.
Nobel Prize in medicine: Decades of work on ‘the brain’s GPS’ recognized By Luc Henry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded with one half to John O’Keefe and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser “for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain”. The maps humans created, first [...]The post Nobel Prize in medicine: Decades of work on ‘the brain’s GPS’ recognized appeared first on PsyPost.
Zapping the brain with tiny magnetic pulses improves memory By Elizabeth Maratos, University of Leicester The practice of physically stimulating the brain in order to alleviate symptoms of illness and injury has been around since the early 20th century. For example, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is still used to alleviate symptoms of depression. However, perhaps in part due to negative connotations associated with ECT, in [...]The post Zapping the brain with tiny magnetic pulses improves memory appeared first on PsyPost.
Combat trauma is nothing like in classical antiquity – so why are we still treating it as such? By Jason Crowley, Manchester Metropolitan University The current understanding of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is like an academic echo of the famous song Universal Soldier. The song imagines the warrior as timeless, unchanging, universal. According to leading historians and theorists, all soldiers experience war in a similar way. They are universal. So the logical conclusion [...]The post Combat trauma is nothing like in classical antiquity – so why are we still treating it as such? appeared first on PsyPost.
Teens taught that personality traits change cope with depression better Learning that personalities and social situations aren't permanent helps teens deal with high school more positively.
How exercise may protect the brain against stress-induced depression Study shows exercise helps rid the body of a stress-induced amino acid associated with mental illness.
Extraordinary experiences could hurt your relationships Because social interaction is grounded in similaries, gushing about an adventurous trip could leave you feeling alone.
About Morality, Are You Old-School or New-School? Brenda has unconventional beliefs but an old-school approach to morality: Find the moral formula and police yourself and others to conform to it. Heather has traditional beliefs but a new-school approach to morality: Embrace broad universal moral standards, and negotiate the rest as a matter of personal preference. Are you more like Brenda or Heather?