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Spike activity 07-11-2014 Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The odd beauty of 60-Year-old preserved brains from the Texas State Mental Hospital. Photo series from the Washington Post. The Concourse has an interesting piece by an ex-con who discusses violence as a social currency in the US prison system. Interesting contrast between forensic […]
Beautiful online neuroscience learning The Fundamentals of Neuroscience is a free online course from Harvard and it looks wonderful – thanks to them employing animators, digital artists and scientists to lift the course above the usual read and repeat learning. The course is already underway but you can register and start learning until mid-December and you can watch any […]
On Body Image: Be Stubborn I can’t tell you how much I love this post from Jennifer Louden (whose work is incredible, and you guys know I link to her pieces regularly). In it she talks about the importance of being stubborn. Jen has penned six non-fiction books, plenty of essays and a magazine column...
How to Detach from Both Criticism and Praise Criticism stings. Many of us may be so focused on protecting ourselves from the potential pain of criticism that we start to tailor our work — and our lives — to avoid it. We may let criticism dictate everything from the ideas we bring up in a board meeting to...
Brain's response to threat silenced when we are reminded of being loved and cared for Being shown pictures of others being loved and cared for reduces the brain's response to threat, new research has found. The study discovered that when individuals are briefly presented pictures of others receiving emotional support and affection, the brain's threat monitor, the amygdala, subsequently does not respond to images showing threatening facial expressions or words. This occurred even if the person was not paying attention to the content of the first pictures.
The Age At Which People Are Least Happy With Their Lives Survey of 160 countries finds the age at which people are the least satisfied with life. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Here’s Why Materialistic People Are Less Happy and Less Satisfied 10 Jobs That Make People Most Happy People Are Happier When They Do The Right Thing A Sense of Purpose Helps You Live Longer How Aging Changes What Makes You Happy
On The Front Lines Haunting nightmares of war and trauma can keep veterans from a healthy night's sleep. The fear of wearing something on their face has driven some of my patients to not wear their CPAP masks, leaving their sleep apnea untreated. Scars from past experience can persist for decades.
Hearing That “Stress Kills” Makes Stress Worse Imagine that your boss walks into your office. She’s in a pinch—the main presenter for today’s company-wide stress relief seminar can’t make it. You’re a great speaker, and your boss needs you to fill in. Although you have no problem presenting, you know little about stress management. What do you...
Patients with ALS have difficulty with verbs: Why? According to many scientists the fact that ALS patients experience (in addition to severe motor deficits) greater linguistic difficulty with verbs denoting action compared to nouns denoting objects depends on their motor deficit. The idea is that the motor system plays a role in the semantic encoding of these words. A new study has tested this hypothesis and suggests a major role for the “executive function”.
How Could We Possibly Do Better With ADHD? I hear from people all the time who tell me about their ADHD. I hear directly from people who comment here, and from people who email me privately (do some snooping here on the blog and you’ll find an email address for me if you are so inclined). I also...
Best of Our Blogs: November 7, 2014 Ever wonder how to really break up with someone in the digital age? What about chronic manipulation, i.e. how you can stop the manipulation cycle? Oh, and do you understand emotional integrity and how to establish it? Our bloggers answer these questions and more in today’s Best of Our Blogs....
PTSD raises the risk of premature birth Researchers hope that treating PTSD could reduce the risks of premature birth.
Accept Yourself Where You Are It’s okay Lisa. Just go with it.   These are the words of a good friend of mine who lost 5 family members during the last year, including her mother and her son. Today, we spoke quietly about anxiety and despair and sadness. She shared the pain of the loss...
Carving memories at their joints How the brain decides when to modify old memories and when to carve new memories is revealed in a study published this week in PLOS Computational Biology. MIT researcher Dr Samuel Gershman and his collaborators at Princeton propose a theoretical framework for understanding how the brain (to quote Plato) “carves nature at its joints”. This [...]The post Carving memories at their joints appeared first on PsyPost.
Sense of meaning and purpose in life linked to longer lifespan A UCL-led study of 9,050 English people with an average age of 65 found that the people with the greatest wellbeing were 30% less likely to die during the average eight and a half year follow-up period than those with the least wellbeing. The study, published in The Lancet as part of a special series [...]The post Sense of meaning and purpose in life linked to longer lifespan appeared first on PsyPost.
Neuroscientists awaken ‘ghosts’ hidden inside the cortex Ghosts exist only in the mind, and scientists know just where to find them, an EPFL study suggests. Patients suffering from neurological or psychiatric conditions have often reported feeling a strange “presence”. Now, EPFL researchers in Switzerland have succeeded in recreating this so-called ghost illusion in the laboratory. On June 29, 1970, mountaineer Reinhold Messner [...]The post Neuroscientists awaken ‘ghosts’ hidden inside the cortex appeared first on PsyPost.
New knowledge about the human brain’s plasticity The brain’s plasticity and its adaptability to new situations do not function the way researchers previously thought, according to a new study published in the journal Cell. Earlier theories are based on laboratory animals, but now researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied the human brain. The results show that a type of support [...]The post New knowledge about the human brain’s plasticity appeared first on PsyPost.
Study shows black, Hispanic children underrepresented in autism identification The number of children diagnosed with autism has increased in recent years, but a new study co-authored by a University of Kansas professor shows that while the number of students with autism increased in every state from 2000 to 2007, black and Hispanic children were significantly underrepresented. Jason Travers, assistant professor of special education, co-authored [...]The post Study shows black, Hispanic children underrepresented in autism identification appeared first on PsyPost.
Defense Mechanisms: Test Your Unconscious Coping Techniques Pretending to hate someone you love, overeating, yelling and being overly optimistic are all manifestations of your unconscious defense mechanisms. This test will help you find out what psychological defenses you tend to use the most (80 questions).
3 Lessons on Body Image, Self-Doubt & Self-Care This month marks five years since I started writing Weightless. (This was my first post published on November 2nd 2009.) Five years! Wow. It’s cliche, but true: Time flies. Like I do every year, I’d like to share a few lessons I’ve learned along the way from writing this blog...