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Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching Myths about the brain are common among teachers worldwide and are hampering teaching, according to new research published October 15. Teachers in the UK, Holland, Turkey, Greece and China were presented with seven so-called ‘neuromyths’ and asked whether they believe them to be true. A quarter or more of teachers in the UK and Turkey [...]The post Myth-conceptions: How myths about the brain are hampering teaching appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain’s compass relies on geometric relationships, researchers discover The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass. Their findings provide a neurological basis for [...]The post Brain’s compass relies on geometric relationships, researchers discover appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Extreme altruists’ motivated by gut instinct: study By Penny Orbell, The Conversation If you noticed a person in grave danger would you act first and think later in order to save them? New research suggests people who put their own lives in danger to help others make the decision to do so without a second thought. The motivation behind the behaviour of [...]The post ‘Extreme altruists’ motivated by gut instinct: study appeared first on PsyPost.
How gut bacteria ensure a healthy brain – and could play a role in treating depression By Clio Korn, University of Oxford One of medicine’s greatest innovations in the 20th century was the development of antibiotics. It transformed our ability to combat disease. But medicine in the 21st century is rethinking its relationship with bacteria and concluding that, far from being uniformly bad for us, many of these organisms are actually [...]The post How gut bacteria ensure a healthy brain – and could play a role in treating depression appeared first on PsyPost.
The Solitude Dilemma This week The Atlantic shared a video in its Editor’s Picks series called ‘The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain.’ It followed a young man named Leif Haugen, a Forest Service firefighter in Montana. For three months out of the year, Leif lives alone at the lookout on top...
Myelin vital for learning new practical skills New evidence of myelin's essential role in learning and retaining new practical skills, such as playing a musical instrument, has been uncovered by research. Myelin is a fatty substance produced by the brain and spinal cord into early adulthood as it is needed for many developmental processes, and although earlier studies of human white matter hinted at its involvement in skill learning, this is the first time it has been confirmed experimentally.
Scientists find 'hidden brain signatures' of consciousness in vegetative state patients Scientists in Cambridge have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state, which point to networks that could support consciousness even when a patient appears to be unconscious and unresponsive. The study could help doctors identify patients who are aware despite being unable to communicate.
The Right Way to Think About Your Risk of Contracting Ebola Ebola has riveted our attention because it's a deadly disease with no known cure and because, as is true of most infectious diseases, it's easy to imagine how readily it could become a global pandemic and therefore threaten us directly.
The Right Way to Think About Your Ebola Risk Ebola has riveted our attention: It's a deadly disease with no known cure, and as is true of most infectious diseases, it's easy to imagine how it could become a global pandemic and threaten us directly.
Why Do We Find It So Hard to Write About Ourselves? When it comes to cover letters and personal statements, why do we find it so hard to write about ourselves? Of course, we’re not writing an autobiography here — we’re writing to seek the approval of others.
Dating Rejection: Being Judged and Finding Fault Rejection, it’s what causes so many negative emotions from shyness, to depression, to anger and even despair. Rejection is never easy to accept. In matters of romance, rejection can do even more damage. When you are rejected by someone you deeply want, it can make you feel worthless, unwanted and...
Brain's compass relies on geometric relationships, say researchers The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass. Their findings provide a neurological basis for something that psychologists have long observed about navigational behavior: people use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.
Are You In The Middle Of A Divorce Or Lean Into The Learning Around You Are you going through something really big like a divorce or an important life challenge? I am a big believer in looking for your learning. Inherent in that learning are opportunities for gratefulness. It is a lifeskill that if you don’t already have, divorce...
Helpful things to say to someone with anxiety The key way to make a connection with an anxiety sufferer is by offering support without judgment.
Tactics for Facing a Pit Bull Attorney in Divorce Court Negative-advocate attorneys escalate their cases and take most of their case activity to court. They formally adopt a splitting approach, acting as if their clients do no wrong and you do no right.
How to tame a wandering mind Evidence suggests that mind-wandering and procrastination can lead to stress, illness and relationship problems.
Relationships are the key to retirement happiness Aging adults find that fulfillment is found not in having more, but in connecting more to other people.
Recognizing the Consequences of Sexual Addiction Assessment Questions It’s not exactly a clinical secret that most of the sex addicts who enter therapy do so in response to their addiction’s related symptoms—disintegrating relationships, depression, severe anxiety, inability to focus at work or in school, social isolation, and the like. Rarely do these individuals walk in the...
Empathy Can Sometimes Motivate This Dark, Unjustified Behaviour Empathy has a dark side which is at odds with its image as a cure-all for the world's problems. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:How To Get a Narcissist to Feel Empathy Neuroscience Reveals The Deep Power of Human Empathy The Honking Experiment: Can You Predict Your Driving Behaviour? People’s Suprising Empathy With The Pain of Their Enemies Chronic Stress Early in Life Causes Anxiety and Aggression in Adulthood
Top 10 ADHD Blogs of 2014 Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. It’s also sometimes known as just attention deficit disorder. What happens when people with ADHD enter the blogosphere? Often they navigate their behavior with quirky, fun and informative blogging, and tell the story of ADHD as it really is,...