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Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers. “Learning and practicing something, for instance a second language, strengthens the brain,” said Ping Li, professor of psychology, linguistics and information sciences and technology. “Like physical exercise, the more you use specific areas of your brain, the more [...]The post Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old appeared first on PsyPost.
Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone’s best friend Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis, is that it’s not necessarily [...]The post Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone’s best friend appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress The brain’s ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person’s brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. The Mount Sinai study [...]The post Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress appeared first on PsyPost.
The backwards brain? Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world Driving to work becomes routine–but could you drive the entire way in reverse gear? Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. In a new study, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveal that moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive [...]The post The backwards brain? Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world appeared first on PsyPost.
“My Intentions Are Good. Don’t They Count For Everything?” Declaring good intentions as though wanting to do the right thing means you couldn't possibly have done the wrong thing is a great way to get people to give up on you, to keep their feedback to themselves, and keep you in the dark about what they really think. Use this rhetorical deflection technique at your own peril. It probably won't get you what you really want.
Why Are Civilian Revolutionaries Prepared To Die For One Another? It's often said that blood is thicker than water – that family ties trump all others. But research with groups of men fighting in Libya has suggested that the bonds they formed in times of great adversity were as strong as those they had with their own kin....
A Mathematical Model Explains Why All Hipsters Look The Same When enough contrarians actively resist mainstream trends, their nonconformity may actually align. Ergo beardsplosion....
Depression, overwhelming guilt in preschool years linked to brain changes A key brain region involved in emotion is smaller in older children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers, and predicts risk of later recurrence, according to researchers. Pathological guilt can be a symptom of clinical depression, as well as other psychiatric disorders including anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder. One expert said it's relatively easy to spot the problem in children because they excessively blame themselves for things they've done -- and haven't done.
The backwards brain? How brain maps develop to help us perceive the world Scientists reveal that physically moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive the world normally. The findings also show that, the order in which we see things could help the brain calibrate how we perceive time, as well as the objects around us.
Soylent Bad: America's Toxic Relationship With Food The Soylent trend represents the worst in American food culture: the tendency to disregard the simple joys of natural culinary delights and sensual living for a bottom-line, work and efficiency-driven lifestyle. Eating should be about pleasure, mindfulness and relationships, not about concerns over wasting time.
Ethical Parenting: Integrity in Parenting “The strength of a nation derives from the integrity of the home.” ~ Confucius. This is the third blog on an Ethical Code of Conduct for Parents in a series on Ethical Parenting. In this blog we will look at Principle C: Integrity. When we look at integrity in the practice...
Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone's best friend Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research, is that their friends don't necessarily see it that way.
How to Refrain from Getting Too Excited about Potentialities A lot has been happening in my life. I’ve had a lot of really exciting opportunities, for which I’m incredibly thankful, but I’ve also had many potential opportunities that fell through. Sometimes they fell through based on my inability to do the work, sometimes it just wasn’t the right fit...
Important brain reward pathway confirmed by researchers Details of the role of glutamate, the brain's excitatory chemical, in a drug reward pathway have been identified for the first time. This discovery in rodents shows that stimulation of glutamate neurons in a specific brain region leads to activation of dopamine-containing neurons in the brain's reward circuit.
‘Smart’ drugs won’t make smart people smarter, research concludes It is claimed one in five students have taken the ‘smart’ drug Modafinil to boost their ability to study and improve their chances of exam success. But new research into the effects of Modafinil has shown that healthy students could find their performance impaired by the drug. 
Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress; suggests new model of depression Discovery of new molecular and behavioral connections may provide a foundation for the development of new treatments to combat some forms of depression. The findings challenge the current thinking about depression and the drugs currently used to treat the disorder.
The Difference Between “Curing Mental Illness” and “Improving Mental Position One: Curing Mental Illness If I have an “illness” I can seek a “cure.” If I seek a cure I am likely to—since pills cure so many things—look for the magic bullet of a pill.  If I am “sick” you can’t blame me or expect me to be responsible...
Thich Nhat Hanh is Dying, But He Will Never Leave Us Today I received a message that one of the greatest mindfulness and compassion teachers to grace this planet is passing away. It may very well be that Thich Nhat Hanh has already passed as you read this. If you’ve been a reader of this blog or any of my work...
Thich Nhat Hanh is in the Hospital, But He YesterdayI received a message that one of the greatest mindfulness and compassion teachers to grace this planet was in the hospital after experiencing a “severe brain hemorrage.” Signs show that he may pull through, but what a scare this has been for those who have been blessed by the teachings of...
Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young, old Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to researchers. "Like physical exercise, the more you use specific areas of your brain, the more it grows and gets stronger," said the lead investigator.