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Teens’ science interest linked with knowledge, but only in wealthier nations It seems logical that a student who is interested in science as an academic subject would also know a lot about science, but new findings show that this link depends on the overall wealth of the country that the teen calls home. The research suggests that individual science achievement may be influenced as much by [...]The post Teens’ science interest linked with knowledge, but only in wealthier nations appeared first on PsyPost.
Study identifies risk factors for sexual assault, including age and alcohol consumption Risk factors for sexual assault, including young age and alcohol consumption, must be addressed when considering preventative strategies, suggests a new study, published today (15 October) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (BJOG). The Danish study used data from all women attending the specialised centre for victims of sexual assault (CVSA) in [...]The post Study identifies risk factors for sexual assault, including age and alcohol consumption appeared first on PsyPost.
Partisan lenses: Beauty lies in your political affiliation Have you ever noticed you find your candidate for political office more attractive than the opponent? New research from Cornell University shows you’re not the only one. “We showed pictures of familiar and unfamiliar political leaders to voters in two different samples and found that familiarity and partisanship each significantly influenced how candidates were perceived,” [...]The post Partisan lenses: Beauty lies in your political affiliation appeared first on PsyPost.
Gene variants implicated in ADHD identify attention and language deficits in the general population Are deficits in attention limited to those with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or is there a spectrum of attention function in the general population? The answer to this question has implications for psychiatric diagnoses and perhaps for society, broadly. A new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry, by researchers at Cardiff University School [...]The post Gene variants implicated in ADHD identify attention and language deficits in the general population appeared first on PsyPost.
Blinded by science: Trivial scientific info increases belief in a product’s efficacy, study finds Do you believe in science? Your faith in science may actually make you more likely to trust information that appears scientific but really doesn’t tell you much. According to a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study, published in Public Understanding of Science, trivial elements such as graphs or formulas can lead consumers to believe [...]The post Blinded by science: Trivial scientific info increases belief in a product’s efficacy, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
Reminding people of their religious beliefs reduces hostility, study finds Few topics can prove more divisive than religion, with some insisting it promotes compassion, selflessness and generosity, and others arguing that it leads to intolerance, isolation and even violence. New research conducted at York University, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, may shed some light on religion’s actual influence on believers – [...]The post Reminding people of their religious beliefs reduces hostility, study finds appeared first on PsyPost.
A memory boost from exercising could pass on to your baby By James Cooke, University of Oxford We all know that exercise is good for our bodies, but current research is revealing that it is also good for our brains. Exercise has been shown to boost executive functions such as planning, working memory and multi-tasking. In a study published in the journal Lancet Neurology, researchers at [...]The post A memory boost from exercising could pass on to your baby appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain scans show who’s likely to trust strangers By Rebecca Slack, University of Sheffield How do you decide if you can trust someone? Is it based on their handshake, the way they look you in the eye, or perhaps their body language? We know that what someone wears has an effect on our trust in them. If you happen to be a doctor, [...]The post Brain scans show who’s likely to trust strangers appeared first on PsyPost.
Why me? Many women living in poverty blame children, love life Having had children -- particularly early in life -- and a dysfunctional romantic relationship are the two most frequently cited reasons when low-income mothers are asked about why they find themselves in poverty, report American researchers.
How to Connect More Deeply With Others “We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men; and among those fibers, as sympathetic threads, our actions run as causes, and they come back to us as effects.” ― Herman Melville The relationships in our life make us who we are. We are social creatures...
Change your walking style, change your mood Our mood can affect how we walk -- slump-shouldered if we're sad, bouncing along if we're happy. Now researchers have shown it works the other way too -- making people imitate a happy or sad way of walking actually affects their mood.
Eating breakfast increases brain chemical involved in regulating food intake, cravings Eating breakfast, particularly meals rich in protein, increases young adults' levels of a brain chemical associated with feelings of reward, which may reduce food cravings and overeating later in the day. Understanding the brain chemical and its role in food cravings could lead to improvements in obesity prevention and treatment.
Choosing the Right Electronic Health Record (EHR) for Your The key to running any company smoothly is to keep meticulous and clear records, and psychotherapy private practices are no exception. Virtually all businesses today operate with an electronic data-keeping system; paper files don’t cut it anymore. More and more private practitioners are moving toward a paperless practice, which includes...
The Traumatized Trauma Therapist, the Mentally Ill Mental Health Though the idea of suffering helping professionals goes back to Greek mythology, the term “Wounded Healer” was first coined by Carl Jung. In fact, he argued that only wounded healers could be effective. There is little research on this phenomenon, but many clinicians, regardless of their training, many not want to tell you...
Where Are You When You’re “Beside Yourself”? The expression “I was beside myself” is one of our language's most intriguing idioms. And the mental state—or better, feeling state—it refers to bears a peculiar resemblance to the splitting of schizophrenia. Still, this familiar phrase is hardly to be taken literally. So just what essential part of you suddenly makes a guest appearance when you're feeling this way?
Apparently Google Glass Addiction Is Now A Thing For the first time ever, psychologists have treated an individual for internet addiction disorder caused by overuse of Google Glass. The patient had been exhibiting withdrawal symptoms when not using the device, and even dreamt he was wearing it. ...
Important: Do Not Overfeed (Yourself or Others) Last weekend, we had a lot of excitement. My nine-year-old daughter got a betta fish, which she named Esther. When we were talking to the clerk about how to care for the fish, she told us, “Be sure not to overfeed your fish. Just two pellets.” When we read the...
This Science Was Invented by a Man Who Believed That Plants Have Minds Plants aren't as flashy as animals, but they're complex beings with elaborate survival strategies who actively engage with the environment around them, and sometimes even helping their fellow plants react to danger. Still, it would be rather a stretch to claim that they have "minds." And yet this is what Gustav Fechner believed. ...
Researcher adds to evidence linking autism to air pollutants Pollution's impact on autism rates in North Carolina is similar to results of previous pollution autism studies in California, a new study reports. This report is has added to a growing body of evidence that links autism to air pollutants such as those generated by cars and trucks.
Professors say new sexual assult policy is one-sided Months after Harvard University announced a new, tougher policy against campus sexual assault, a group of Harvard law professors is blasting the rules as unfair.