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Picture emerges of how kids get head injuries A study in which more than 43,000 children were evaluated for head trauma offers an unprecedented picture of how children most frequently suffer head injuries, report physicians. The findings also indicate how often such incidents result in significant brain injuries, computerized tomography (CT) scans to assess head injuries, and neurosurgery to treat them.
10 Questions to Avoid Passive-Aggressive Co-Parenting Your child is hears (and feels) all of those subtle pot-shots you take at your ex. Everyone knows the basics of co-parenting: stay kid-focused, don’t use your kids as messengers, never use your kids as scapegoats, show up on time, and don’t talk negatively about your ex in front of...
Driving Me Mad If you follow this blog you may be aware of the fact that I have OCD issues revolving around driving. Well, today I took a 4 and a half hour trip with just my dog in the backseat. It is the first time in a few months that I have...
How does the brain develop in individuals with autism? Geneticists at Heidelberg University Hospital’s Department of Molecular Human Genetics have used a new mouse model to demonstrate the way a certain genetic mutation is linked to a type of autism in humans and affects brain development and behavior. In the brain of genetically altered mice, the protein FOXP1 is not synthesized, which is also [...]The post How does the brain develop in individuals with autism? appeared first on PsyPost.
‘Smart’ drugs won’t make smart people smarter It is claimed one in five students have taken the ‘smart’ drug Modafinil to boost their ability to study and improve their chances of exam success. But new research into the effects of Modafinil has shown that healthy students could find their performance impaired by the drug. The study carried out by Dr Ahmed Dahir [...]The post ‘Smart’ drugs won’t make smart people smarter appeared first on PsyPost.
Artificial retina could someday help restore vision The loss of eyesight, often caused by retinal degeneration, is a life-altering health issue for many people, especially as they age. But a new development toward a prosthetic retina could help counter conditions that result from problems with this crucial part of the eye. Scientists published their research on a new device, which they tested [...]The post Artificial retina could someday help restore vision appeared first on PsyPost.
Research team identifies genetic variant linked to better memory performance People with a newly identified genetic variant perform better on certain types of memory tests, a discovery that may point the way to new treatments for the memory impairments caused by Alzheimer’s disease or other age-associated conditions. In what the international research team is calling the largest study to date of human memory, an analysis [...]The post Research team identifies genetic variant linked to better memory performance appeared first on PsyPost.
Self-inflation harms kids’ relationships at school “I am the smartest kid in class.” We all want our kids to be self-confident, but unrealistic perceptions of their academic abilities can be harmful. These unrealistic views, a new study of eighth-graders finds, damage the a child’s relationship with others in the classroom: The more one student feels unrealistically superior to another, the less [...]The post Self-inflation harms kids’ relationships at school appeared first on PsyPost.
Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers. “Learning and practicing something, for instance a second language, strengthens the brain,” said Ping Li, professor of psychology, linguistics and information sciences and technology. “Like physical exercise, the more you use specific areas of your brain, the more [...]The post Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old appeared first on PsyPost.
Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone’s best friend Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis, is that it’s not necessarily [...]The post Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone’s best friend appeared first on PsyPost.
Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress The brain’s ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person’s brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. The Mount Sinai study [...]The post Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress appeared first on PsyPost.
The backwards brain? Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world Driving to work becomes routine–but could you drive the entire way in reverse gear? Humans, like many animals, are accustomed to seeing objects pass behind us as we go forward. Moving backwards feels unnatural. In a new study, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveal that moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive [...]The post The backwards brain? Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world appeared first on PsyPost.
“My Intentions Are Good. Don’t They Count For Everything?” Declaring good intentions as though wanting to do the right thing means you couldn't possibly have done the wrong thing is a great way to get people to give up on you, to keep their feedback to themselves, and keep you in the dark about what they really think. Use this rhetorical deflection technique at your own peril. It probably won't get you what you really want.
Why Are Civilian Revolutionaries Prepared To Die For One Another? It's often said that blood is thicker than water – that family ties trump all others. But research with groups of men fighting in Libya has suggested that the bonds they formed in times of great adversity were as strong as those they had with their own kin....
A Mathematical Model Explains Why All Hipsters Look The Same When enough contrarians actively resist mainstream trends, their nonconformity may actually align. Ergo beardsplosion....
Depression, overwhelming guilt in preschool years linked to brain changes A key brain region involved in emotion is smaller in older children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers, and predicts risk of later recurrence, according to researchers. Pathological guilt can be a symptom of clinical depression, as well as other psychiatric disorders including anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder. One expert said it's relatively easy to spot the problem in children because they excessively blame themselves for things they've done -- and haven't done.
The backwards brain? How brain maps develop to help us perceive the world Scientists reveal that physically moving forward actually trains the brain to perceive the world normally. The findings also show that, the order in which we see things could help the brain calibrate how we perceive time, as well as the objects around us.
Soylent Bad: America's Toxic Relationship With Food The Soylent trend represents the worst in American food culture: the tendency to disregard the simple joys of natural culinary delights and sensual living for a bottom-line, work and efficiency-driven lifestyle. Eating should be about pleasure, mindfulness and relationships, not about concerns over wasting time.
Ethical Parenting: Integrity in Parenting “The strength of a nation derives from the integrity of the home.” ~ Confucius. This is the third blog on an Ethical Code of Conduct for Parents in a series on Ethical Parenting. In this blog we will look at Principle C: Integrity. When we look at integrity in the practice...
Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone's best friend Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research, is that their friends don't necessarily see it that way.