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Peak Experience and Happiness Attention happiness seekers. A new study shows you will suffer social exclusion if you bliss out alone first. How good are the data, though?
What Drives a Person to Suicide? Each of us has swings in our mood or has highs and lows in our emotional feelings. If these swings are within a certain normal range, we remain self-governed and functional. But when they become extreme, they can lead us into the poles of mania and depression. In some cases...
Just two hours of extra physical activity each week improves school performance: study Just two hours of extra physical activity each week can improve school performance. This has been shown by a study of approximately 2,000 twelve-year-olds carried out by scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy. The scientists Lina Bunketorp Käll, Michael Nilsson and Thomas Linden, at the Centre for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University [...]The post Just two hours of extra physical activity each week improves school performance: study appeared first on PsyPost.
The neuroscience of holding it: The link in the brain between the pelvic floor and other muscles Wherever you are right now: squeeze your glutes. Feel that? You just also contracted your pelvic floor too, whether you wanted to or not. Scientists studying the source of chronic abdominal and pelvic floor pain found an unexpected connection in the brain between the pelvic floor – the muscle responsible for, among other things, keeping [...]The post The neuroscience of holding it: The link in the brain between the pelvic floor and other muscles appeared first on PsyPost.
Why do some woman want labial reduction surgery? Study examines motivations behind ‘designer vaginas’ More woman are seeking to reshape the folds of skin surrounding their vulva than ever before. New research has found that most women who desire surgery to reduce the size of their labia minora are driven by emotional rather than medical considerations. “The present research findings shed new light on why women consider undergoing labia [...]The post Why do some woman want labial reduction surgery? Study examines motivations behind ‘designer vaginas’ appeared first on PsyPost.
Your brain on MDMA: Video shows how molly works, and why it might help PTSD sufferers The post Your brain on MDMA: Video shows how molly works, and why it might help PTSD sufferers appeared first on PsyPost.
Forced to be bad: When eating that chocolate cake is ‘not our fault’? Imagine you’re dining out with a friend who insists on sharing some chocolate cake for dessert. Since the decision has already been made for you, you gladly join in without feeling any regret. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are happier when someone else decides they can indulge in [...]The post Forced to be bad: When eating that chocolate cake is ‘not our fault’? appeared first on PsyPost.
Attending church does not protect against cognitive decline in older age: study Contrary to earlier findings, new research suggests that attending church does not help prevent cognitive decline in older adults. Several studies have found that more religious people tend to be slightly less intelligent, but studies have also found that attendance at religious ceremonies has a protective effect against age-related cognitive decline. “In the present study, [...]The post Attending church does not protect against cognitive decline in older age: study appeared first on PsyPost.
The color of love? ‘Red effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our “red” reactions. “Previous research shows that the color [...]The post The color of love? ‘Red effect’ sparks interest in female monkeys appeared first on PsyPost.
Blue Collar Roots vs. White Collar Reality My father was a machinist and my mother a nurse. I still recall the smell of the machine shop on my father’s clothing when he came home from work, the name “Gary” embroidered on his blue shirt. When I was a child, my father chopped wood and sold it by the...
Getting Grit This is the second installment of our two part series on “Grit”, defined by Webster as “indomitable spirit; resourceful courage and daring in the face of difficulty.” In case you’re wondering about what in the world would be sufficiently challenging to require such great strength of will and intention, the answer, which...
Defending Lincoln Against Psychoanalysis Why did a New York state senator want to ban psychoanalysis in 1931?
Ease Stress and Improve Mental Health with Group Nature “In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” – John Muir For those of us in the northern hemisphere, autumn is finally here — that time of year when we feel a natural longing to get outside, enjoy the cooler weather and witness nature’s colorful displays....
7 Common Neuromyths That Many Educators Believe Do any of these myths about the brain catch you out? Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:Debunked: ‘Right-Brain’ and ‘Left-Brain’ Personalities Connectivity: The Difference Between Men’s and Women’s Brains 10 Most Awe-Inspiring Neuroscience Studies Top 5 Psychology Articles This Month (Aug ’13) Brain Changes Associated With Casual Marijuana Use
What a Narcissist Needs is More, not Less, Self-Love Narcissists may seem as though they’re completely in love with themselves, but at the root of their inflated egos are deeply-held feelings of inferiority. Arguments and criticism therefore bring out their worst fears. Perhaps instead of self-love we should think of narcissists as experiencing self-hate.
Psychology Around the Net: October 18, 2014 Suffer from insomnia? Ever feel you might be addicted to the Internet? Interested in seeing what a schizophrenia episode actually looks like? We have it all and more in this week’s Psychology Around the Net. Hip-Hop Therapy Is New Route to Mental Wellbeing, Says Psychiatrists: According to researchers in the...
A Common Sense Definition of Common Sense Common sense is (literally) what can be commonly sensed. Not thought or felt but sensed.  If you and I are both sensing (seeing) a sunrise, that’s something that we are commonly sensing (by way of seeing). As for the rest of what we typically consider “common sense” – it’s really...
Pushed to Excel “I push people beyond what’s expected of them. I believe that is an absolute necessity.” How much does forceful mentoring help students achieve excellence, and when does it become abusive? Those issues are part of the movie Whiplash, apparently named after the jazz standard by Hank Levy. The quote above...
You Are an Idiot if You Still Use Whisper Whisper is one of those newer mobile apps that leads you to believe you can share information anonymously online. “With Whisper, you’re free to anonymously share your thoughts with the world, and build lasting, meaningful relationships in a community built around trust and honesty.” Trust and honesty, huh? What if...
How the brain leads us to believe we have sharp vision We assume that we can see the world around us in sharp detail. In fact, our eyes can only process a fraction of our surroundings precisely. In a series of experiments, psychologists at Bielefeld University have been investigating how the brain fools us into believing that we see in sharp detail. The results have been [...]The post How the brain leads us to believe we have sharp vision appeared first on PsyPost.