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When heart cancer hides in the brain The 59-year-old woman had complained of chest pain and shortness of breath. A biopsy revealed that she had an unusual type of 'heart cancer' called cardiac lymphoma. But a week after receiving treatment, the patient developed a headache and her motor skills began to deteriorate.
Mathematical model shows how brain remains stable during learning Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists. Neuronal networks form a learning machine that allows the brain to extract and store new information from its surroundings via the senses. Researchers have long puzzled over how the brain achieves sensitivity and stability to unexpected new experiences during learning -- two seemingly contradictory requirements.
The Day I Realized I’d Stopped Eating (& What So, I’ve lost 10 pounds in the last two weeks. Don’t congratulate me; I wasn’t trying. You see, I’ve been a freelance writer and editor for the past decade and, as such, I juggle several clients and a variety of projects during any given day. Having been at it as...
How a Schedule Can Help You Sleep Better The fancy digital, pedometer-bracelet thingy around my wrist tells me I slept six hours and 25 minutes with four interruptions. As I struggle to awake, my body can tell you, that isn’t nearly enough. An estimated 70 million Americans are sleep-deprived, according to the National Sleep Foundation and the Centers...
The Familiar Food Which May Help Fight Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer's study finds that one ounce (30g) of this per day was enough to decrease anxiety and boost memory and learning. Dr Jeremy Dean is a psychologist and author of PsyBlog. His latest book is "Making Habits, Breaking Habits: How to Make Changes That Stick" Related articles:10 Ways to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease Longevity Gene May Enhance Cognition Copper Pinpointed as Main Environmental Cause of Alzheimer’s Disease The Personality Trait That Doubles Alzheimer’s Risk This Blood Type Linked to Memory Loss Later in Life
Sense of Entitlement Quiz: Are You Setting Up Yourself for Disappointment? A lot of our frustrations are due to unmet expectations and not all our expectations are reasonable. This entitlement mentality test will help you take an objective look at yourself and, hopefully, reduce frustration and sadness in your life.
Genes exhibit different behaviours in different stages of development The effect that genes have on our brain depends on our age, researchers say. It has been known for a number of years that particular genetic variations are of importance for the functioning of neural circuits in the brain. Just how these effects differ in the various stages of life has until recently not been fully understood. This international study has been able to demonstrate that genetic variations at different times in our lives can actually have opposite effects on the brain, which provides an explanation for the differences that clinicians observe in the psychiatric symptoms and response to medications of adolescents and adults.
5 More Ways to Cultivate Your Child’s Creativity Last month I interviewed Tom Sturges, a music executive and mentor, about his tips for cultivating creativity in kids. This month I wanted to share some great tips from Julia Cameron’s book The Artist’s Way for Parents: Raising Creative Children. If you’re unfamiliar with Cameron, she penned a bestselling book...
ADHD On Standby My stereo has three modes, on, off, and standby. When it’s off, it is right off. When it’s on, and when I manage to have the right combination of controls in the right place, it plays music, news, sports, and weather for me. When it’s on standby, it is supposedly...
Top 5 Myths about Mindfulness Meditation Do you know the myths about mindfulness and what is true or false about this swelling revolution? Take a look at what I think are the top five myths about mindfulness. Note: There are plenty more, but I thought these top the charts. Myth #1: Mindfulness if for taking a...
Ebola: Coping with Fear and Uncertainty Something very different happens to us when we face an epidemic as opposed to a natural disaster. When a natural disaster hits, there is anxiety, and traumatic loss but such events have a clear beginning and end. Natural disasters are devastating but there are few unknowns. With the collective loss,...
What a panic attack physically feels like Sufferers share how a panic attack manifests itself physically.
Majority of men want flexible work Research is showing that having a measure of control over when, where and how work gets done is something nearly everybody wants, including men.
Walnuts may prevent or slow onset of Alzheimer’s Study found that mice, fed the equivalent for humans of about ounce of walnuts a day, performed better on memory tests.
Coping With A Mental Health Crisis: Using Effective Skills Crisis. What comes to mind when you hear this term? Do you think of natural disasters such as hurricanes, national health concerns like the Ebola virus, personal struggles such as a divorce or failed relationship, or perhaps something less dramatic but still emotionally draining such as failed expectations or loss...
Who is at Fault: It’s a matter of Perspective From time to time, you may have had thought if you did X then a person would react in a predictable, desirable, anticipated way. This reminds me of a client I was seeing. One day she brought flowers from her garden. This client took enormous pride in her prize winning...
Clot dissolver tpa's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery uPA appears to help brain cells recover from the injuries induced by loss of blood flow. Treating mice with uPA after an experimental stroke can improve their recovery of motor function, researchers have found.
When Conflict Gets Dangerous All couples fight. It’s perfectly healthy and normal. Disagreements are a natural part of relationships, and even if you’re deeply in love, some level of conflict is inevitable. In fact, avoiding conflict does more harm than good. Letting anger and resentment build up is a surefire recipe for trouble. However,...
Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections When it comes to the brain, “more is better” seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) recently found that an immune-system protein called [...]The post Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections appeared first on PsyPost.
Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life Those who self-harm as teenagers are more at risk of developing mental health and substance misuse problems as adults, new research from the biggest study of its kind in the UK has revealed. Researchers at the University of Bristol, working together with colleagues from the University of Oxford and University College London, collected data from [...]The post Teenage self-harm linked to problems in later life appeared first on PsyPost.